lambda phage control dna Search Results


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  • 99
    New England Biolabs control lambda phage dna
    Digestion of phage <t>λ</t> DNA by wild-type and mutant M. bovis cells. Sampling time points were 15 min (a), 30 min (b), and 60 min (c). Lane M, molecular mass markers (Bioline Hyperladder I); lanes 1, nuclease-free water (negative control); lanes 2,
    Control Lambda Phage Dna, supplied by New England Biolabs, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 99/100, based on 24 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/control lambda phage dna/product/New England Biolabs
    Average 99 stars, based on 24 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
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    99
    Thermo Fisher lambda phage dna
    Low Ionic Strength Destabilizes Chromatin. (a–c) AFM images of chromatin assembled from <t>lambda</t> phage <t>DNA</t> in 2-fold diluted egg extract in XB2 buffer and digested with restriction enzyme Alu I. The final buffer is (a) XB2 buffer, (b) 10 mM HEPES
    Lambda Phage Dna, supplied by Thermo Fisher, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 99/100, based on 43 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/lambda phage dna/product/Thermo Fisher
    Average 99 stars, based on 43 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    lambda phage dna - by Bioz Stars, 2020-08
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    96
    Promega lambda phage dna
    Low Ionic Strength Destabilizes Chromatin. (a–c) AFM images of chromatin assembled from <t>lambda</t> phage <t>DNA</t> in 2-fold diluted egg extract in XB2 buffer and digested with restriction enzyme Alu I. The final buffer is (a) XB2 buffer, (b) 10 mM HEPES
    Lambda Phage Dna, supplied by Promega, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 96/100, based on 95 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/lambda phage dna/product/Promega
    Average 96 stars, based on 95 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    lambda phage dna - by Bioz Stars, 2020-08
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    93
    Thermo Fisher unmethylated lambda phage dna
    Low Ionic Strength Destabilizes Chromatin. (a–c) AFM images of chromatin assembled from <t>lambda</t> phage <t>DNA</t> in 2-fold diluted egg extract in XB2 buffer and digested with restriction enzyme Alu I. The final buffer is (a) XB2 buffer, (b) 10 mM HEPES
    Unmethylated Lambda Phage Dna, supplied by Thermo Fisher, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 93/100, based on 4 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/unmethylated lambda phage dna/product/Thermo Fisher
    Average 93 stars, based on 4 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    unmethylated lambda phage dna - by Bioz Stars, 2020-08
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    90
    New England Biolabs lambda phage dna
    Low Ionic Strength Destabilizes Chromatin. (a–c) AFM images of chromatin assembled from <t>lambda</t> phage <t>DNA</t> in 2-fold diluted egg extract in XB2 buffer and digested with restriction enzyme Alu I. The final buffer is (a) XB2 buffer, (b) 10 mM HEPES
    Lambda Phage Dna, supplied by New England Biolabs, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 90/100, based on 174 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/lambda phage dna/product/New England Biolabs
    Average 90 stars, based on 174 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    lambda phage dna - by Bioz Stars, 2020-08
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    Image Search Results


    Digestion of phage λ DNA by wild-type and mutant M. bovis cells. Sampling time points were 15 min (a), 30 min (b), and 60 min (c). Lane M, molecular mass markers (Bioline Hyperladder I); lanes 1, nuclease-free water (negative control); lanes 2,

    Journal: Journal of Bacteriology

    Article Title: Disruption of the Membrane Nuclease Gene (MBOVPG45_0215) of Mycoplasma bovis Greatly Reduces Cellular Nuclease Activity

    doi: 10.1128/JB.00034-15

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Digestion of phage λ DNA by wild-type and mutant M. bovis cells. Sampling time points were 15 min (a), 30 min (b), and 60 min (c). Lane M, molecular mass markers (Bioline Hyperladder I); lanes 1, nuclease-free water (negative control); lanes 2,

    Article Snippet: The exonuclease and endonuclease activities of the cells were determined by incubating proteins from cells from late-log-phase cultures suspended in 50 μl of nuclease reaction buffer (25 mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.8, 10 mM CaCl2 , 10 mM MgCl2 ) at 37°C with 500 ng of double-stranded phage λ DNA (New England BioLabs) or 2.0 μg of closed circular plasmid DNA (plasmid pRecAGKIRRPG2, which was generated to disrupt a specific gene target by homologous recombination in M. bovis ) as the substrates.

    Techniques: Mutagenesis, Sampling, Negative Control

    Low Ionic Strength Destabilizes Chromatin. (a–c) AFM images of chromatin assembled from lambda phage DNA in 2-fold diluted egg extract in XB2 buffer and digested with restriction enzyme Alu I. The final buffer is (a) XB2 buffer, (b) 10 mM HEPES

    Journal: Chromosoma

    Article Title: Atomic Force Microscope Imaging of Chromatin Assembled in Xenopus laevis Egg Extract

    doi: 10.1007/s00412-010-0307-4

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Low Ionic Strength Destabilizes Chromatin. (a–c) AFM images of chromatin assembled from lambda phage DNA in 2-fold diluted egg extract in XB2 buffer and digested with restriction enzyme Alu I. The final buffer is (a) XB2 buffer, (b) 10 mM HEPES

    Article Snippet: In order to estimate the tip-induced-width-increase in width measurement, we imaged lambda-phage DNA (Fermentas) on 0.1% glutaraldehyde mica surface using three different AFM probes.

    Techniques:

    Direct Imaging Method for AFM of Higher-Order Structures. AFM images of chromatin assembled from lambda phage DNA in Xenopus laevis egg extract on streptavidin-coated surface and imaged directly on the same surface. (a) The control surface without DNA

    Journal: Chromosoma

    Article Title: Atomic Force Microscope Imaging of Chromatin Assembled in Xenopus laevis Egg Extract

    doi: 10.1007/s00412-010-0307-4

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Direct Imaging Method for AFM of Higher-Order Structures. AFM images of chromatin assembled from lambda phage DNA in Xenopus laevis egg extract on streptavidin-coated surface and imaged directly on the same surface. (a) The control surface without DNA

    Article Snippet: In order to estimate the tip-induced-width-increase in width measurement, we imaged lambda-phage DNA (Fermentas) on 0.1% glutaraldehyde mica surface using three different AFM probes.

    Techniques: Imaging

    Diluted Extracts Produce Mixed Chromatin and DNA Structures. AFM images of chromatin assembled from lambda phage DNA in (a) 2-fold, (b) 20-fold and (c) 100-fold diluted egg extract digested with restriction enzyme Alu I in XB2 buffer. The final solution

    Journal: Chromosoma

    Article Title: Atomic Force Microscope Imaging of Chromatin Assembled in Xenopus laevis Egg Extract

    doi: 10.1007/s00412-010-0307-4

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Diluted Extracts Produce Mixed Chromatin and DNA Structures. AFM images of chromatin assembled from lambda phage DNA in (a) 2-fold, (b) 20-fold and (c) 100-fold diluted egg extract digested with restriction enzyme Alu I in XB2 buffer. The final solution

    Article Snippet: In order to estimate the tip-induced-width-increase in width measurement, we imaged lambda-phage DNA (Fermentas) on 0.1% glutaraldehyde mica surface using three different AFM probes.

    Techniques:

    Types of data output provided by the custom analysis software of the real-time digital nucleic acid amplification instrument after a multivolume PCR reaction using lambda DNA on a multivolume SlipChip device with a 15 s exposure time. Each graph (B–D) was exported as line art and scaled. (A) An image depicting the mask created to define the locations of each compartmentalized reaction on a multivolume microfluidic device. (B) Baseline-corrected amplification traces from each of the reaction wells on the microfluidic device. Two intensity groups result because in this multivolume microfluidic device there are two well depths (the two larger volumes are 100 μm deep and the two smaller volumes are 50 μm deep) [ 20 ]. The arrow shows the correlation of a single compartmentalized reaction (A) to its real-time trace (B). (C) A graph depicting the number of positive reactions as a function of amplification cycle from the data generated in (B). (D) A graph depicting the negative derivative of the collected melt curve traces from each of the positive reactions. (E) A screenshot of the analysis software analyzing the real-time data shown in panel (B).

    Journal: PLoS ONE

    Article Title: Instrument for Real-Time Digital Nucleic Acid Amplification on Custom Microfluidic Devices

    doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0163060

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Types of data output provided by the custom analysis software of the real-time digital nucleic acid amplification instrument after a multivolume PCR reaction using lambda DNA on a multivolume SlipChip device with a 15 s exposure time. Each graph (B–D) was exported as line art and scaled. (A) An image depicting the mask created to define the locations of each compartmentalized reaction on a multivolume microfluidic device. (B) Baseline-corrected amplification traces from each of the reaction wells on the microfluidic device. Two intensity groups result because in this multivolume microfluidic device there are two well depths (the two larger volumes are 100 μm deep and the two smaller volumes are 50 μm deep) [ 20 ]. The arrow shows the correlation of a single compartmentalized reaction (A) to its real-time trace (B). (C) A graph depicting the number of positive reactions as a function of amplification cycle from the data generated in (B). (D) A graph depicting the negative derivative of the collected melt curve traces from each of the positive reactions. (E) A screenshot of the analysis software analyzing the real-time data shown in panel (B).

    Article Snippet: Bio-Rad (Hercules, CA, USA) SsoFast Evagreen Supermix, Phage lambda DNA (500 μg), SUPERase In RNase Inhibitor (20 U/μL), mineral oil (DNase, RNase, and Protease free), and tetradecane were purchased from Thermo Fisher Scientific (Hanover Park, IL, USA).

    Techniques: Software, Amplification, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Lambda DNA Preparation, Generated

    Measuring CL–DNA NP Size with Dynamic Light Scattering ( A, B, C, D ) Dynamic light scattering results for CL–DNA NPs formed at a lipid molar ratio of 80/20-x/x DOTAP/DOPC/PEG2K-lipid (x = PEG2K-lipid mol fraction) with pGL3(A), S-DNA (B), 11 bp duplex DNA (C), or λ-DNA (D) in either water (blue curves) or DMEM (red curves) as a function of ρ chg . The data in (A), (B) and (C) exhibit a maximum in size near the isoelectric point (ρ chg = 1), while that in (D) shows the diameter continuously increasing as ρ chg decreases below the isoelectric point. The size of NPs not formed with λ-DNA (A, B and C) tends to be smaller when formed in DMEM. ( E, F ) Hydrodynamic diameter of NPs as a function of ionic buffer strength for λ-DNA (E), pGL3 (E), S-DNA (F) and 11 bp DNA (F). As ionic buffer strength increases, NPs form at smaller sizes. This effect is most pronounced for λ-DNA at ρ chg = 1/3 (hollow blue squares in (E)). ( G ) Hydrodynamic diameter of cationic liposomes without DNA in water and DMEM.

    Journal: Langmuir : the ACS journal of surfaces and colloids

    Article Title: Patterned Thread-like Micelles and DNA-Tethered Nanoparticles: A Structural Study of PEGylated Cationic Liposome–DNA Assemblies

    doi: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b00993

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Measuring CL–DNA NP Size with Dynamic Light Scattering ( A, B, C, D ) Dynamic light scattering results for CL–DNA NPs formed at a lipid molar ratio of 80/20-x/x DOTAP/DOPC/PEG2K-lipid (x = PEG2K-lipid mol fraction) with pGL3(A), S-DNA (B), 11 bp duplex DNA (C), or λ-DNA (D) in either water (blue curves) or DMEM (red curves) as a function of ρ chg . The data in (A), (B) and (C) exhibit a maximum in size near the isoelectric point (ρ chg = 1), while that in (D) shows the diameter continuously increasing as ρ chg decreases below the isoelectric point. The size of NPs not formed with λ-DNA (A, B and C) tends to be smaller when formed in DMEM. ( E, F ) Hydrodynamic diameter of NPs as a function of ionic buffer strength for λ-DNA (E), pGL3 (E), S-DNA (F) and 11 bp DNA (F). As ionic buffer strength increases, NPs form at smaller sizes. This effect is most pronounced for λ-DNA at ρ chg = 1/3 (hollow blue squares in (E)). ( G ) Hydrodynamic diameter of cationic liposomes without DNA in water and DMEM.

    Article Snippet: Four distinct types of DNA were used to form nanoparticles; UltraPure Salmon Sperm DNA Solution (S-DNA) (Invitrogen (Carlsbad, CA)), Lambda Phage DNA (λ-DNA) (Thermo Scientific (Waltham, MA)), pGL3 Luciferase Reporter plasmid DNA (pGL3) (Promega (Fitchburg, Wisconsin)), which was propagated via Qiagen Plasmid Plus Mega Kit (Venlo, Limburg) and 11 bp DNA (purchased as single strands from Sigma-Genosys (Sigma-Aldrich (St. Louis, MI) and delivered as a lyophilized film).

    Techniques:

    CL–DNA NPs formed with DNA of different length and topology. ( A ) NPs formed with S-DNA (linear, polydiserse, L mean ≈ 2 kbps) at a lipid molar ratio of 80/15/5 DOTAP/DOPC/PEG2K-Lipid at ρ chg = 3 show a lamellar texture. ( B ) NPs formed with λ-DNA (linear, monodisperse, L mean ≈ 48 kbps) at lipid ratio of 80/15/5 DOTAP/DOPC/PEG5K–lipid at ρ chg = 3 show the lamellar texture as well as terminated bilayer edges (solid arrows). ( C ) NPs formed with pGL3 (circular, monodisperse, L mean ≈ 4.5 kbps) at a lipid molar ratio of 80/10/10 DOTAP/DOPC/PEG2K-lipid at ρ chg = 2 show terminated bilayer edges (solid arrows) similar to (B). In contrast to polydisperse S-DNA, NPs formed with λ-DNA or pGL3 can exhibit hollow cores (dotted arrow) or the lamellar morphology from core to surface (red arrow). All scale bars are 50 nm.

    Journal: Langmuir : the ACS journal of surfaces and colloids

    Article Title: Patterned Thread-like Micelles and DNA-Tethered Nanoparticles: A Structural Study of PEGylated Cationic Liposome–DNA Assemblies

    doi: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b00993

    Figure Lengend Snippet: CL–DNA NPs formed with DNA of different length and topology. ( A ) NPs formed with S-DNA (linear, polydiserse, L mean ≈ 2 kbps) at a lipid molar ratio of 80/15/5 DOTAP/DOPC/PEG2K-Lipid at ρ chg = 3 show a lamellar texture. ( B ) NPs formed with λ-DNA (linear, monodisperse, L mean ≈ 48 kbps) at lipid ratio of 80/15/5 DOTAP/DOPC/PEG5K–lipid at ρ chg = 3 show the lamellar texture as well as terminated bilayer edges (solid arrows). ( C ) NPs formed with pGL3 (circular, monodisperse, L mean ≈ 4.5 kbps) at a lipid molar ratio of 80/10/10 DOTAP/DOPC/PEG2K-lipid at ρ chg = 2 show terminated bilayer edges (solid arrows) similar to (B). In contrast to polydisperse S-DNA, NPs formed with λ-DNA or pGL3 can exhibit hollow cores (dotted arrow) or the lamellar morphology from core to surface (red arrow). All scale bars are 50 nm.

    Article Snippet: Four distinct types of DNA were used to form nanoparticles; UltraPure Salmon Sperm DNA Solution (S-DNA) (Invitrogen (Carlsbad, CA)), Lambda Phage DNA (λ-DNA) (Thermo Scientific (Waltham, MA)), pGL3 Luciferase Reporter plasmid DNA (pGL3) (Promega (Fitchburg, Wisconsin)), which was propagated via Qiagen Plasmid Plus Mega Kit (Venlo, Limburg) and 11 bp DNA (purchased as single strands from Sigma-Genosys (Sigma-Aldrich (St. Louis, MI) and delivered as a lyophilized film).

    Techniques:

    The construction of mismatched DNA used in single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (smTIRF) microscopy a , A schematic illustration for the construction of a 17.3-kb mismatched DNA. L or R (blue) indicates the orientation of the DNA relative to the L and R cos end of λ-phage DNA. P (red) indicates the 5′-phosphate of the DNA. b , A schematic illustration of 17.3-kb mismatched DNA observation by prism-based smTIRF microscopy. c , Representative mismatched DNA visualized by smTIRF microscopy in the absence of flow. The DNA was stained with Sytox Orange and a 40 × 85 µm field of view is shown. d , A schematic illustration of the DNA length determination. e , The length distribution of the mismatched DNA observed by smTIRF microscopy. Gaussian fit of the data are shown along with the mean ± s.d.

    Journal: Nature

    Article Title: Cascading MutS and MutL sliding clamps control DNA diffusion to activate mismatch repair

    doi: 10.1038/nature20562

    Figure Lengend Snippet: The construction of mismatched DNA used in single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (smTIRF) microscopy a , A schematic illustration for the construction of a 17.3-kb mismatched DNA. L or R (blue) indicates the orientation of the DNA relative to the L and R cos end of λ-phage DNA. P (red) indicates the 5′-phosphate of the DNA. b , A schematic illustration of 17.3-kb mismatched DNA observation by prism-based smTIRF microscopy. c , Representative mismatched DNA visualized by smTIRF microscopy in the absence of flow. The DNA was stained with Sytox Orange and a 40 × 85 µm field of view is shown. d , A schematic illustration of the DNA length determination. e , The length distribution of the mismatched DNA observed by smTIRF microscopy. Gaussian fit of the data are shown along with the mean ± s.d.

    Article Snippet: λ-phage DNA (3.2 nM, Thermo Scientific) was ligated with the lambda mismatch 1 oligonucleotide (800 nM; , ) at room temperature (22 °C) overnight.

    Techniques: Fluorescence, Microscopy, Flow Cytometry, Staining

    DNA titration using SYBR ® Green I and PicoGreen ® dyes . PicoGreen ® fluorescence (A) and SYBR ® Green I fluorescence (B) with bacteriophage λ DNA in absence (black circle, solid line), or presence (dotted lines) of different amounts of detergents: saponin 0.008% + Triton X-100 0.08% (white triangle); saponin 0.008% (white square); Triton X-100 0.08% (white diamonds); Triton X-100 2% (white circle). Background fluorescence, defined as fluorescence detected in the absence of DNA, was subtracted from each data point. Fluorescence is measured as arbitrary units (AU). Data show average from three replicate experiments. Error bars indicate standard deviations. Lines were calculated by linear regression; r 2 > 0.99.

    Journal: Malaria Journal

    Article Title: Haemoglobin interference and increased sensitivity of fluorimetric assays for quantification of low-parasitaemia Plasmodium infected erythrocytes

    doi: 10.1186/1475-2875-8-279

    Figure Lengend Snippet: DNA titration using SYBR ® Green I and PicoGreen ® dyes . PicoGreen ® fluorescence (A) and SYBR ® Green I fluorescence (B) with bacteriophage λ DNA in absence (black circle, solid line), or presence (dotted lines) of different amounts of detergents: saponin 0.008% + Triton X-100 0.08% (white triangle); saponin 0.008% (white square); Triton X-100 0.08% (white diamonds); Triton X-100 2% (white circle). Background fluorescence, defined as fluorescence detected in the absence of DNA, was subtracted from each data point. Fluorescence is measured as arbitrary units (AU). Data show average from three replicate experiments. Error bars indicate standard deviations. Lines were calculated by linear regression; r 2 > 0.99.

    Article Snippet: Standard curves of DNA were performed by diluting bacteriophage λ DNA, provided at 100 μg/mL in the Quant-iT™ PicoGreen® Kits (Molecular Probes™, Invitrogen) with DNase-free water.

    Techniques: Titration, SYBR Green Assay, Fluorescence

    Agarose gel restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) profiles with HhaI of profiles 0806, 1103, and 1518. DNA from bacteriophage lambda used as marker. The first 7 bands are identical. Profile 1103 (BTYP 6110) had a similar REA profile to both 0806 and 1518, with more bands in common with profile 0806. The profiles group very closely on the phylogenetic tree as well.

    Journal: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation : Official Publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc

    Article Title: Comparison of whole genome sequencing to restriction endonuclease analysis and gel diffusion precipitin-based serotyping of Pasteurellamultocida

    doi: 10.1177/1040638717732371

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Agarose gel restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) profiles with HhaI of profiles 0806, 1103, and 1518. DNA from bacteriophage lambda used as marker. The first 7 bands are identical. Profile 1103 (BTYP 6110) had a similar REA profile to both 0806 and 1518, with more bands in common with profile 0806. The profiles group very closely on the phylogenetic tree as well.

    Article Snippet: The stop buffer (25% Ficoll [MilliporeSigma, St. Louis, MO], 0.25% xylene cyanol, 0.25% bromophenol blue, in sterile water) was added after 3 h. DNA from the bacteriophage lambda was digested with Hin dIII (Invitrogen) and used in triplicate as a marker on every gel.

    Techniques: Agarose Gel Electrophoresis, Marker

    Agarose gel restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) profiles with HhaI of 1011 and 1119. DNA from bacteriophage lambda was used as a marker. Profile 1119 had an extra band between 4.4 Kb and 2.3 Kb indicated by the red arrow, and they become more diverse around 3.0 Kb. These profiles shared a common ancestor on the phylogenetic tree.

    Journal: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation : Official Publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc

    Article Title: Comparison of whole genome sequencing to restriction endonuclease analysis and gel diffusion precipitin-based serotyping of Pasteurellamultocida

    doi: 10.1177/1040638717732371

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Agarose gel restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) profiles with HhaI of 1011 and 1119. DNA from bacteriophage lambda was used as a marker. Profile 1119 had an extra band between 4.4 Kb and 2.3 Kb indicated by the red arrow, and they become more diverse around 3.0 Kb. These profiles shared a common ancestor on the phylogenetic tree.

    Article Snippet: The stop buffer (25% Ficoll [MilliporeSigma, St. Louis, MO], 0.25% xylene cyanol, 0.25% bromophenol blue, in sterile water) was added after 3 h. DNA from the bacteriophage lambda was digested with Hin dIII (Invitrogen) and used in triplicate as a marker on every gel.

    Techniques: Agarose Gel Electrophoresis, Marker

    Agarose gel restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) profiles with HhaI of 4 reference strains (P-2100, P-903, P-1573, P-2237) and BTYP 9903. DNA from bacteriophage lambda was used as a marker. The purple, red, peach, and green nodes are the reference strains for T10, T11, T12, and T15 (respectively) used in gel diffusion precipitin testing (GDPT). On the tree, T10 and T12 shared a common ancestor, and their REA profiles were very similar above 3.0 Kb. T11 and T15 also shared a common ancestor but were more diverse in REA profile, although multiple bands do align between the 2 profiles. This illustrates that different GDPT serovars did not necessarily mean the isolates were diverse.

    Journal: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation : Official Publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc

    Article Title: Comparison of whole genome sequencing to restriction endonuclease analysis and gel diffusion precipitin-based serotyping of Pasteurellamultocida

    doi: 10.1177/1040638717732371

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Agarose gel restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) profiles with HhaI of 4 reference strains (P-2100, P-903, P-1573, P-2237) and BTYP 9903. DNA from bacteriophage lambda was used as a marker. The purple, red, peach, and green nodes are the reference strains for T10, T11, T12, and T15 (respectively) used in gel diffusion precipitin testing (GDPT). On the tree, T10 and T12 shared a common ancestor, and their REA profiles were very similar above 3.0 Kb. T11 and T15 also shared a common ancestor but were more diverse in REA profile, although multiple bands do align between the 2 profiles. This illustrates that different GDPT serovars did not necessarily mean the isolates were diverse.

    Article Snippet: The stop buffer (25% Ficoll [MilliporeSigma, St. Louis, MO], 0.25% xylene cyanol, 0.25% bromophenol blue, in sterile water) was added after 3 h. DNA from the bacteriophage lambda was digested with Hin dIII (Invitrogen) and used in triplicate as a marker on every gel.

    Techniques: Agarose Gel Electrophoresis, Marker, Diffusion-based Assay

    Agarose gel restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) profiles with HhaI of profiles 1023, 0522, and 1083. DNA from bacteriophage lambda was used as a marker. Profiles 1023 and 0522 were originally all classified as profile 1023. All 3 REA profiles shared many similarities but there are distinct differences below the 4.4 Kb marker. The whole genome sequence results show that all 3 profiles are very similar but do divide based on profile identification, with the exception of BTYP 6055 and BTYP 6053.

    Journal: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation : Official Publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc

    Article Title: Comparison of whole genome sequencing to restriction endonuclease analysis and gel diffusion precipitin-based serotyping of Pasteurellamultocida

    doi: 10.1177/1040638717732371

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Agarose gel restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) profiles with HhaI of profiles 1023, 0522, and 1083. DNA from bacteriophage lambda was used as a marker. Profiles 1023 and 0522 were originally all classified as profile 1023. All 3 REA profiles shared many similarities but there are distinct differences below the 4.4 Kb marker. The whole genome sequence results show that all 3 profiles are very similar but do divide based on profile identification, with the exception of BTYP 6055 and BTYP 6053.

    Article Snippet: The stop buffer (25% Ficoll [MilliporeSigma, St. Louis, MO], 0.25% xylene cyanol, 0.25% bromophenol blue, in sterile water) was added after 3 h. DNA from the bacteriophage lambda was digested with Hin dIII (Invitrogen) and used in triplicate as a marker on every gel.

    Techniques: Agarose Gel Electrophoresis, Marker, Sequencing