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Olympus nanotubes optical microscopy
( a ) SEM image of P(PDI-DTT) <t>nanotubes</t> in a bunch. ( b ) TEM image of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes dispersed on carbon-coated copper grids. ( c ) TEM image of single P(PDI-DTT) nanotube.
Nanotubes Optical Microscopy, supplied by Olympus, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 92/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
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1) Product Images from "Convenient fabrication of conjugated polymer semiconductor nanotubes and their application in organic electronics"

Article Title: Convenient fabrication of conjugated polymer semiconductor nanotubes and their application in organic electronics

Journal: Royal Society Open Science

doi: 10.1098/rsos.180868

( a ) SEM image of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes in a bunch. ( b ) TEM image of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes dispersed on carbon-coated copper grids. ( c ) TEM image of single P(PDI-DTT) nanotube.
Figure Legend Snippet: ( a ) SEM image of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes in a bunch. ( b ) TEM image of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes dispersed on carbon-coated copper grids. ( c ) TEM image of single P(PDI-DTT) nanotube.

Techniques Used: Transmission Electron Microscopy

TEM images of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes dispersed on carbon-coated copper grids. Preparation condition: ( a ) without container of chloroform in Petri dish; ( b ) with reverse side as the template.
Figure Legend Snippet: TEM images of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes dispersed on carbon-coated copper grids. Preparation condition: ( a ) without container of chloroform in Petri dish; ( b ) with reverse side as the template.

Techniques Used: Transmission Electron Microscopy

Transfer curve of polymer nanotube.
Figure Legend Snippet: Transfer curve of polymer nanotube.

Techniques Used:

Related Articles

Electron Microscopy:

Article Title: Convenient fabrication of conjugated polymer semiconductor nanotubes and their application in organic electronics
Article Snippet: .. Characterization of nanotubes Optical microscopy (Olympus BX51) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Hitachi S-4800) were used to characterize the morphology of the nanotubes. ..

Microscopy:

Article Title: Convenient fabrication of conjugated polymer semiconductor nanotubes and their application in organic electronics
Article Snippet: .. Characterization of nanotubes Optical microscopy (Olympus BX51) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Hitachi S-4800) were used to characterize the morphology of the nanotubes. ..

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  • 92
    Olympus nanotubes optical microscopy
    ( a ) SEM image of P(PDI-DTT) <t>nanotubes</t> in a bunch. ( b ) TEM image of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes dispersed on carbon-coated copper grids. ( c ) TEM image of single P(PDI-DTT) nanotube.
    Nanotubes Optical Microscopy, supplied by Olympus, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 92/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/nanotubes optical microscopy/product/Olympus
    Average 92 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    nanotubes optical microscopy - by Bioz Stars, 2020-09
    92/100 stars
      Buy from Supplier

    91
    Olympus swnts
    SWNT uptake into circulating cells a . Representative intravital fluorescence image of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-laden circulating cells in tumour vasculature (one example cell is circled). Grayscale – SWNT-Cy5.5; Red – long-circulating dye highlighting tumour blood vessels; Green – EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein)-transfected tumour cells. Scale-bar: 40 μm. b . Schematic of <t>SWNTs</t> non-covalently coated with a block amphiphile phospholipid PEG on the surface, with hydrophobic segment (light blue) associated with the SWNT surface and the hydrophilic segment (green) attached to Cy5.5 fluorescent dye (red sphere) and/or RGD (or RAD) peptide (blue cyclic ball structure). SWNTs were injected into SCID mice with implanted window chambers and imaged dynamically over weeks. c . Darkfield image of SWNTs in a live circulating blood cell extracted from a mouse and FACS-sorted for positive SWNT-Cy5.5 signal (SWNTs pseudocolored in red, analyzed by <t>hyperspectral</t> imaging). Scale bar: 1 μm. d . The hyperspectral spectra are taken from a plain SWNT-cy5.5 solution in PBS. Each curve represents scattered photons from a pixel in the SWNT solution. The y-axis is in dimensionless units, a digital number representing a conversion from the camera voltage to a digital quantity. SWNTs are pseudocolored red in (c) based on the spatial localization of this reference SWNT hyperspectral spectrum overlaid on the darkfield image. This analysis confirms the presence of SWNTs in circulating blood cells.
    Swnts, supplied by Olympus, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 91/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/swnts/product/Olympus
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    86
    Olympus gold nanorod dimers
    Scattering spectra from <t>nanorod</t> dimer structures with various θ . From a to f , the structure angles are 0°, 28°, 65°, 103°, 168°, and 180°, respectively. Zoomed-in SEM images of the dimer structures are shown in the inset . S- ( red ) and P-polarization ( blue ) are respectively parallel and perpendicular to the bisector of the nanorods. (Color figure online)
    Gold Nanorod Dimers, supplied by Olympus, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 86/100, based on 2 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
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    91
    Olympus gold nanorods
    Integration of semiconductor and plasmonic materials for the studies of plasmon enhanced exciton generation and photon emission. ( a ) Schematic showing the InAs quantum dots (QDs) confined in an InGaAs quantum well, capped with GaAs of variable thickness ( d ) and coupled to a single gold <t>nanorod</t> (AuNR). The short lines around the colloidal AuNR represent the surface ligands (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide). The plasmon near-field enhances electron-hole pair generation in the GaAs and InGaAs layers and the enhancement of photon emission by the InAs QDs depends on the carrier capture rates from the GaAs (black arrow) and from the InGaAs well (green arrow) by the QDs. ( b ) The energy level diagram shows that the excitation energy (1.96 eV) is high enough to promote electron from the valence band to the conduction band in any of the materials including the GaAs that has the highest band gap energy. ( c – e ) Topographic AFM scan images obtained before the InGaAs and GaAs layers are grown ( d ), after the InGaAs and GaAs layers are grown ( e ), and after the AuNRs are drop-casted on the GaAs surface. ( f ) Dark-field image of AuNRs on GaAs surface. The color of the dark-field images of the individual AuNRs varies from red to green, depending on the proximity of the AuNRs to the GaAs surface.
    Gold Nanorods, supplied by Olympus, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 91/100, based on 2 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
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    Image Search Results


    ( a ) SEM image of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes in a bunch. ( b ) TEM image of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes dispersed on carbon-coated copper grids. ( c ) TEM image of single P(PDI-DTT) nanotube.

    Journal: Royal Society Open Science

    Article Title: Convenient fabrication of conjugated polymer semiconductor nanotubes and their application in organic electronics

    doi: 10.1098/rsos.180868

    Figure Lengend Snippet: ( a ) SEM image of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes in a bunch. ( b ) TEM image of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes dispersed on carbon-coated copper grids. ( c ) TEM image of single P(PDI-DTT) nanotube.

    Article Snippet: Characterization of nanotubes Optical microscopy (Olympus BX51) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Hitachi S-4800) were used to characterize the morphology of the nanotubes.

    Techniques: Transmission Electron Microscopy

    TEM images of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes dispersed on carbon-coated copper grids. Preparation condition: ( a ) without container of chloroform in Petri dish; ( b ) with reverse side as the template.

    Journal: Royal Society Open Science

    Article Title: Convenient fabrication of conjugated polymer semiconductor nanotubes and their application in organic electronics

    doi: 10.1098/rsos.180868

    Figure Lengend Snippet: TEM images of P(PDI-DTT) nanotubes dispersed on carbon-coated copper grids. Preparation condition: ( a ) without container of chloroform in Petri dish; ( b ) with reverse side as the template.

    Article Snippet: Characterization of nanotubes Optical microscopy (Olympus BX51) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Hitachi S-4800) were used to characterize the morphology of the nanotubes.

    Techniques: Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Transfer curve of polymer nanotube.

    Journal: Royal Society Open Science

    Article Title: Convenient fabrication of conjugated polymer semiconductor nanotubes and their application in organic electronics

    doi: 10.1098/rsos.180868

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Transfer curve of polymer nanotube.

    Article Snippet: Characterization of nanotubes Optical microscopy (Olympus BX51) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Hitachi S-4800) were used to characterize the morphology of the nanotubes.

    Techniques:

    SWNT uptake into circulating cells a . Representative intravital fluorescence image of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-laden circulating cells in tumour vasculature (one example cell is circled). Grayscale – SWNT-Cy5.5; Red – long-circulating dye highlighting tumour blood vessels; Green – EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein)-transfected tumour cells. Scale-bar: 40 μm. b . Schematic of SWNTs non-covalently coated with a block amphiphile phospholipid PEG on the surface, with hydrophobic segment (light blue) associated with the SWNT surface and the hydrophilic segment (green) attached to Cy5.5 fluorescent dye (red sphere) and/or RGD (or RAD) peptide (blue cyclic ball structure). SWNTs were injected into SCID mice with implanted window chambers and imaged dynamically over weeks. c . Darkfield image of SWNTs in a live circulating blood cell extracted from a mouse and FACS-sorted for positive SWNT-Cy5.5 signal (SWNTs pseudocolored in red, analyzed by hyperspectral imaging). Scale bar: 1 μm. d . The hyperspectral spectra are taken from a plain SWNT-cy5.5 solution in PBS. Each curve represents scattered photons from a pixel in the SWNT solution. The y-axis is in dimensionless units, a digital number representing a conversion from the camera voltage to a digital quantity. SWNTs are pseudocolored red in (c) based on the spatial localization of this reference SWNT hyperspectral spectrum overlaid on the darkfield image. This analysis confirms the presence of SWNTs in circulating blood cells.

    Journal: Nature nanotechnology

    Article Title: Selective uptake of single walled carbon nanotubes by circulating monocytes for enhanced tumour delivery

    doi: 10.1038/nnano.2014.62

    Figure Lengend Snippet: SWNT uptake into circulating cells a . Representative intravital fluorescence image of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-laden circulating cells in tumour vasculature (one example cell is circled). Grayscale – SWNT-Cy5.5; Red – long-circulating dye highlighting tumour blood vessels; Green – EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein)-transfected tumour cells. Scale-bar: 40 μm. b . Schematic of SWNTs non-covalently coated with a block amphiphile phospholipid PEG on the surface, with hydrophobic segment (light blue) associated with the SWNT surface and the hydrophilic segment (green) attached to Cy5.5 fluorescent dye (red sphere) and/or RGD (or RAD) peptide (blue cyclic ball structure). SWNTs were injected into SCID mice with implanted window chambers and imaged dynamically over weeks. c . Darkfield image of SWNTs in a live circulating blood cell extracted from a mouse and FACS-sorted for positive SWNT-Cy5.5 signal (SWNTs pseudocolored in red, analyzed by hyperspectral imaging). Scale bar: 1 μm. d . The hyperspectral spectra are taken from a plain SWNT-cy5.5 solution in PBS. Each curve represents scattered photons from a pixel in the SWNT solution. The y-axis is in dimensionless units, a digital number representing a conversion from the camera voltage to a digital quantity. SWNTs are pseudocolored red in (c) based on the spatial localization of this reference SWNT hyperspectral spectrum overlaid on the darkfield image. This analysis confirms the presence of SWNTs in circulating blood cells.

    Article Snippet: Dark-Field and Hyperspectral Imaging After isolating cells loaded with SWNTs using FACS, we analyzed these cells using a BX-51 Olympus microscope (Olympus, Center Valley, PA) equipped with CytoViva® (Auburn, AL) enhanced darkfield illumination optics, using a 100X oil and variable 0.6–1.35 NA objective with full spectrum aluminum halogen source illumination.

    Techniques: Fluorescence, Transfection, Blocking Assay, Injection, Mouse Assay, FACS, Imaging

    Scattering spectra from nanorod dimer structures with various θ . From a to f , the structure angles are 0°, 28°, 65°, 103°, 168°, and 180°, respectively. Zoomed-in SEM images of the dimer structures are shown in the inset . S- ( red ) and P-polarization ( blue ) are respectively parallel and perpendicular to the bisector of the nanorods. (Color figure online)

    Journal: Nano-Micro Letters

    Article Title: Angle-Resolved Plasmonic Properties of Single Gold Nanorod Dimers

    doi: 10.1007/s40820-014-0011-7

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Scattering spectra from nanorod dimer structures with various θ . From a to f , the structure angles are 0°, 28°, 65°, 103°, 168°, and 180°, respectively. Zoomed-in SEM images of the dimer structures are shown in the inset . S- ( red ) and P-polarization ( blue ) are respectively parallel and perpendicular to the bisector of the nanorods. (Color figure online)

    Article Snippet: The dark-field scattering image and spectra of the individual gold nanorod dimers were measured using an Olympus BX53 optical microscope integrated with an Acton SpectraPro SP2750 monochromator and a Princeton Instruments PyLon 400BR charge-coupled device (CCD), which was cooled by liquid nitrogen to ~120 °C.

    Techniques:

    Plasmonic hybridization of the gold nanorod dimer. a A typical scattering spectrum obtained with specific excitation polarization. b Charge distribution profiles obtained using FDTD method. The colors indicate the relative sign of the charges. Upper-left S-polarization at 672 nm. Upper-right S-polarization at 853 nm. Lower-left P-polarization at 672 nm. Lower-right P-polarization at 853 nm. c Plasmonic hybridization theory scheme depicting the analogous hybridized excited energy. d Calculated scattering coefficient is plotted as a function of energy at various φ = 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90°. (Color figure online)

    Journal: Nano-Micro Letters

    Article Title: Angle-Resolved Plasmonic Properties of Single Gold Nanorod Dimers

    doi: 10.1007/s40820-014-0011-7

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Plasmonic hybridization of the gold nanorod dimer. a A typical scattering spectrum obtained with specific excitation polarization. b Charge distribution profiles obtained using FDTD method. The colors indicate the relative sign of the charges. Upper-left S-polarization at 672 nm. Upper-right S-polarization at 853 nm. Lower-left P-polarization at 672 nm. Lower-right P-polarization at 853 nm. c Plasmonic hybridization theory scheme depicting the analogous hybridized excited energy. d Calculated scattering coefficient is plotted as a function of energy at various φ = 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90°. (Color figure online)

    Article Snippet: The dark-field scattering image and spectra of the individual gold nanorod dimers were measured using an Olympus BX53 optical microscope integrated with an Acton SpectraPro SP2750 monochromator and a Princeton Instruments PyLon 400BR charge-coupled device (CCD), which was cooled by liquid nitrogen to ~120 °C.

    Techniques: Hybridization

    SEM and optical characterizations of gold nanorod assemblies. a TEM image of gold naonrods (69.3 ± 4.9 × 23.6 ± 1.8 nm, with an aspect ratio of 2.9 ± 0.3). b – d Representative TEM images of three assembled gold nanorod dimers. The angles between the two nanorods are 0°, 70°, and 149°, respectively. e High-resolution TEM image for the gap of the gold nanorod dimer in ( b ), indicating the gap distance between the two nanorods as about 1 nm. f SEM image for the gold nanorod dimers deposited on a cover glass substrate. The inset shows a SEM image for the dimer highlighted in the blue circle at high magnification. g Dark-field scattering image of the same area shown in SEM image ( f ). (Color figure online)

    Journal: Nano-Micro Letters

    Article Title: Angle-Resolved Plasmonic Properties of Single Gold Nanorod Dimers

    doi: 10.1007/s40820-014-0011-7

    Figure Lengend Snippet: SEM and optical characterizations of gold nanorod assemblies. a TEM image of gold naonrods (69.3 ± 4.9 × 23.6 ± 1.8 nm, with an aspect ratio of 2.9 ± 0.3). b – d Representative TEM images of three assembled gold nanorod dimers. The angles between the two nanorods are 0°, 70°, and 149°, respectively. e High-resolution TEM image for the gap of the gold nanorod dimer in ( b ), indicating the gap distance between the two nanorods as about 1 nm. f SEM image for the gold nanorod dimers deposited on a cover glass substrate. The inset shows a SEM image for the dimer highlighted in the blue circle at high magnification. g Dark-field scattering image of the same area shown in SEM image ( f ). (Color figure online)

    Article Snippet: The dark-field scattering image and spectra of the individual gold nanorod dimers were measured using an Olympus BX53 optical microscope integrated with an Acton SpectraPro SP2750 monochromator and a Princeton Instruments PyLon 400BR charge-coupled device (CCD), which was cooled by liquid nitrogen to ~120 °C.

    Techniques: Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Integration of semiconductor and plasmonic materials for the studies of plasmon enhanced exciton generation and photon emission. ( a ) Schematic showing the InAs quantum dots (QDs) confined in an InGaAs quantum well, capped with GaAs of variable thickness ( d ) and coupled to a single gold nanorod (AuNR). The short lines around the colloidal AuNR represent the surface ligands (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide). The plasmon near-field enhances electron-hole pair generation in the GaAs and InGaAs layers and the enhancement of photon emission by the InAs QDs depends on the carrier capture rates from the GaAs (black arrow) and from the InGaAs well (green arrow) by the QDs. ( b ) The energy level diagram shows that the excitation energy (1.96 eV) is high enough to promote electron from the valence band to the conduction band in any of the materials including the GaAs that has the highest band gap energy. ( c – e ) Topographic AFM scan images obtained before the InGaAs and GaAs layers are grown ( d ), after the InGaAs and GaAs layers are grown ( e ), and after the AuNRs are drop-casted on the GaAs surface. ( f ) Dark-field image of AuNRs on GaAs surface. The color of the dark-field images of the individual AuNRs varies from red to green, depending on the proximity of the AuNRs to the GaAs surface.

    Journal: Scientific Reports

    Article Title: Active Mediation of Plasmon Enhanced Localized Exciton Generation, Carrier Diffusion and Enhanced Photon Emission

    doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-00964-5

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Integration of semiconductor and plasmonic materials for the studies of plasmon enhanced exciton generation and photon emission. ( a ) Schematic showing the InAs quantum dots (QDs) confined in an InGaAs quantum well, capped with GaAs of variable thickness ( d ) and coupled to a single gold nanorod (AuNR). The short lines around the colloidal AuNR represent the surface ligands (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide). The plasmon near-field enhances electron-hole pair generation in the GaAs and InGaAs layers and the enhancement of photon emission by the InAs QDs depends on the carrier capture rates from the GaAs (black arrow) and from the InGaAs well (green arrow) by the QDs. ( b ) The energy level diagram shows that the excitation energy (1.96 eV) is high enough to promote electron from the valence band to the conduction band in any of the materials including the GaAs that has the highest band gap energy. ( c – e ) Topographic AFM scan images obtained before the InGaAs and GaAs layers are grown ( d ), after the InGaAs and GaAs layers are grown ( e ), and after the AuNRs are drop-casted on the GaAs surface. ( f ) Dark-field image of AuNRs on GaAs surface. The color of the dark-field images of the individual AuNRs varies from red to green, depending on the proximity of the AuNRs to the GaAs surface.

    Article Snippet: The dark-field scattering images of the gold nanorods are obtained using a GX51 Olympus microscope.

    Techniques: