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BioTek Instruments microtest plate spectrophotometer
Microtest Plate Spectrophotometer, supplied by BioTek Instruments, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 91/100, based on 4 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
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Average 91 stars, based on 4 article reviews
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microtest plate spectrophotometer - by Bioz Stars, 2020-07
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Activity Assay:

Article Title: Hispolon suppresses metastasis via autophagic degradation of cathepsin S in cervical cancer cells
Article Snippet: .. The Cathepsin S activity was quantified after reading the absorbance of each well at 400 nm in a microtest plate spectrophotometer (STNERGY/H4, BioTek Instruments, Inc., Winoosi, VT, USA). .. Statistical analysis Statistically significant differences were calculated using the Student’s t -test (SigmaPlot 10.0, Jandel Scientific, and San Rafael, CA, USA).

Spectrophotometry:

Article Title: High Level of Plasma EGFL6 Is Associated with Clinicopathological Characteristics in Patients with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Article Snippet: .. The absorbance was measured at 450 nm by using a microtest plate spectrophotometer (BioTek Instruments, Vemont, USA). ..

Article Title: Plasma Levels of Endothelial Cell-Specific Molecule-1 as a Potential Biomarker of Oral Cancer Progression
Article Snippet: .. After reading the absorbance of each well at 450 nm in a microtest plate spectrophotometer (STNERGY/H4, BioTek Instruments, Inc., Winoosi, VT, USA), the ESM-1 levels were quantified using a calibration curve, with the provided human ESM-1 as a standard. .. Expression Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas OSCC data The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA; URL: https://tcga-data.nci.nih.gov/tcga/ ) was used to obtain the ESM-1 normalized expression data and associated clinical data, which corresponds to the head and neck squamous cell carcinoma dataset (n = 528).

Article Title: Hispolon suppresses metastasis via autophagic degradation of cathepsin S in cervical cancer cells
Article Snippet: .. The Cathepsin S activity was quantified after reading the absorbance of each well at 400 nm in a microtest plate spectrophotometer (STNERGY/H4, BioTek Instruments, Inc., Winoosi, VT, USA). .. Statistical analysis Statistically significant differences were calculated using the Student’s t -test (SigmaPlot 10.0, Jandel Scientific, and San Rafael, CA, USA).

Article Title: High EGFL6 expression is associated with clinicopathological characteristics in colorectal cancer
Article Snippet: .. The absorbance was measured at 450 nm by using a microtest plate spectrophotometer (BioTek Instruments, Vemont, USA). ..

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  • 85
    BioTek Instruments microtiter plate scanning spectrophotometer
    Stability of sn -OEO and/or tung oil TAGs coated in the <t>microtiter</t> plate wells. After TAGs coating, the absorbance at 272 nm was recorded for 40 min in the presence of the reaction buffer alone (A), in the reaction buffer containing 4.8 μg of BSA/microwell (B), in the reaction buffer containing 39 µg of HPL S152G/microwell (C), and in the reaction buffer containing 20 ng of HPL or heat HPL-inactivated HPL/microwell (D).
    Microtiter Plate Scanning Spectrophotometer, supplied by BioTek Instruments, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 85/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/microtiter plate scanning spectrophotometer/product/BioTek Instruments
    Average 85 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    microtiter plate scanning spectrophotometer - by Bioz Stars, 2020-07
    85/100 stars
      Buy from Supplier

    93
    BioTek Instruments microtiter plate reader
    The effect of NAC on biofilm development and dismantling. (a) Microbiome taken from the chronic wounds and grown in 96-well <t>microtiter</t> plates. Concentrations of NAC ranging from 3 to 20 mg/ml were applied to the cultures at the times indicated (0, 6, 12, and 24 h). The pictures shown were taken at 48 h after initiation of the culture. When ≥4 mg/ml NAC were applied to the culture at 0 h, the biofilm never developed. When ≥10 mg/ml of NAC was applied at 6, 12, and 24 h after culture initiation, biofilm formation was visibly altered or became fragile and disrupted. (b) At 48 h, biofilm was stained with crystal violet (CV) and the absorbance at 590 nm was measured to quantify biofilm biomass. At 0 h, 5 mg/ml application, 5 mg/ml NAC significantly reduced the appearance of biofilm, and when applied at 6 and 12 h, it was able to decrease biofilm production but not when applied at 24 h. ≥10 mg/ml NAC or more significantly diminish biofilm formation. Three technical repeats with standard deviation as error bars for quantitative data. (c) The dose-dependent effect of NAC on 24 h old biofilm cultured in 35 mm petri dishes was recorded over time. 20 mg/ml of NAC dismantled biofilm by 24 h; 10 and 7.5 mg/ml of NAC were able to fully disrupt biofilm at 30 and 54 h, respectively. 5 mg/ml NAC did not cause changes in existing biofilm.
    Microtiter Plate Reader, supplied by BioTek Instruments, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 93/100, based on 163 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/microtiter plate reader/product/BioTek Instruments
    Average 93 stars, based on 163 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    microtiter plate reader - by Bioz Stars, 2020-07
    93/100 stars
      Buy from Supplier

    Image Search Results


    Stability of sn -OEO and/or tung oil TAGs coated in the microtiter plate wells. After TAGs coating, the absorbance at 272 nm was recorded for 40 min in the presence of the reaction buffer alone (A), in the reaction buffer containing 4.8 μg of BSA/microwell (B), in the reaction buffer containing 39 µg of HPL S152G/microwell (C), and in the reaction buffer containing 20 ng of HPL or heat HPL-inactivated HPL/microwell (D).

    Journal: Journal of Lipid Research

    Article Title: An ultraviolet spectrophotometric assay for the screening of sn-2-specific lipases using 1,3-O-dioleoyl-2-O-?-eleostearoyl-sn-glycerol as substrate

    doi: 10.1194/jlr.D019489

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Stability of sn -OEO and/or tung oil TAGs coated in the microtiter plate wells. After TAGs coating, the absorbance at 272 nm was recorded for 40 min in the presence of the reaction buffer alone (A), in the reaction buffer containing 4.8 μg of BSA/microwell (B), in the reaction buffer containing 39 µg of HPL S152G/microwell (C), and in the reaction buffer containing 20 ng of HPL or heat HPL-inactivated HPL/microwell (D).

    Article Snippet: A lipase solution (2–10 µl) was added to each well, and the optical density (OD) at 272 nm was recorded continuously at regular time intervals of 30 s against the buffer alone using a microtiter plate-scanning spectrophotometer (PowerWave™ , Bio-Tek Instruments).

    Techniques:

    Assays of the lipase activities of CALA, HPL, and YLLIP2 using TAGs from tung oil and sn -OEO coated on microtiter plates. Panels A, C, and E show typical kinetics of the increase in the OD at 272 nm during the hydrolysis of tung oil TAGs and sn -OEO by CALA (340 ng), HPL (20 ng), and YLLIP2 (12 ng), respectively. Panels B, D, and F show the effects of the enzyme amounts on the steady-state reaction rate using TAGs from tung oil as substrate. For enzyme reaction, 50 μg/well of coated tung oil TAGs or sn -OEO were incubated with variable amounts of CALA, HPL, and YLLIP2 injected into the well containing 200 μl of standard buffer. The increase in the OD at 272 nm was recorded for 40 min, and the initial velocity (ΔDO/min) was taken into account for reaction rate determination.

    Journal: Journal of Lipid Research

    Article Title: An ultraviolet spectrophotometric assay for the screening of sn-2-specific lipases using 1,3-O-dioleoyl-2-O-?-eleostearoyl-sn-glycerol as substrate

    doi: 10.1194/jlr.D019489

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Assays of the lipase activities of CALA, HPL, and YLLIP2 using TAGs from tung oil and sn -OEO coated on microtiter plates. Panels A, C, and E show typical kinetics of the increase in the OD at 272 nm during the hydrolysis of tung oil TAGs and sn -OEO by CALA (340 ng), HPL (20 ng), and YLLIP2 (12 ng), respectively. Panels B, D, and F show the effects of the enzyme amounts on the steady-state reaction rate using TAGs from tung oil as substrate. For enzyme reaction, 50 μg/well of coated tung oil TAGs or sn -OEO were incubated with variable amounts of CALA, HPL, and YLLIP2 injected into the well containing 200 μl of standard buffer. The increase in the OD at 272 nm was recorded for 40 min, and the initial velocity (ΔDO/min) was taken into account for reaction rate determination.

    Article Snippet: A lipase solution (2–10 µl) was added to each well, and the optical density (OD) at 272 nm was recorded continuously at regular time intervals of 30 s against the buffer alone using a microtiter plate-scanning spectrophotometer (PowerWave™ , Bio-Tek Instruments).

    Techniques: Incubation, Injection

    The effect of NAC on biofilm development and dismantling. (a) Microbiome taken from the chronic wounds and grown in 96-well microtiter plates. Concentrations of NAC ranging from 3 to 20 mg/ml were applied to the cultures at the times indicated (0, 6, 12, and 24 h). The pictures shown were taken at 48 h after initiation of the culture. When ≥4 mg/ml NAC were applied to the culture at 0 h, the biofilm never developed. When ≥10 mg/ml of NAC was applied at 6, 12, and 24 h after culture initiation, biofilm formation was visibly altered or became fragile and disrupted. (b) At 48 h, biofilm was stained with crystal violet (CV) and the absorbance at 590 nm was measured to quantify biofilm biomass. At 0 h, 5 mg/ml application, 5 mg/ml NAC significantly reduced the appearance of biofilm, and when applied at 6 and 12 h, it was able to decrease biofilm production but not when applied at 24 h. ≥10 mg/ml NAC or more significantly diminish biofilm formation. Three technical repeats with standard deviation as error bars for quantitative data. (c) The dose-dependent effect of NAC on 24 h old biofilm cultured in 35 mm petri dishes was recorded over time. 20 mg/ml of NAC dismantled biofilm by 24 h; 10 and 7.5 mg/ml of NAC were able to fully disrupt biofilm at 30 and 54 h, respectively. 5 mg/ml NAC did not cause changes in existing biofilm.

    Journal: Journal of Diabetes Research

    Article Title: N-Acetyl-cysteine and Mechanisms Involved in Resolution of Chronic Wound Biofilm

    doi: 10.1155/2020/9589507

    Figure Lengend Snippet: The effect of NAC on biofilm development and dismantling. (a) Microbiome taken from the chronic wounds and grown in 96-well microtiter plates. Concentrations of NAC ranging from 3 to 20 mg/ml were applied to the cultures at the times indicated (0, 6, 12, and 24 h). The pictures shown were taken at 48 h after initiation of the culture. When ≥4 mg/ml NAC were applied to the culture at 0 h, the biofilm never developed. When ≥10 mg/ml of NAC was applied at 6, 12, and 24 h after culture initiation, biofilm formation was visibly altered or became fragile and disrupted. (b) At 48 h, biofilm was stained with crystal violet (CV) and the absorbance at 590 nm was measured to quantify biofilm biomass. At 0 h, 5 mg/ml application, 5 mg/ml NAC significantly reduced the appearance of biofilm, and when applied at 6 and 12 h, it was able to decrease biofilm production but not when applied at 24 h. ≥10 mg/ml NAC or more significantly diminish biofilm formation. Three technical repeats with standard deviation as error bars for quantitative data. (c) The dose-dependent effect of NAC on 24 h old biofilm cultured in 35 mm petri dishes was recorded over time. 20 mg/ml of NAC dismantled biofilm by 24 h; 10 and 7.5 mg/ml of NAC were able to fully disrupt biofilm at 30 and 54 h, respectively. 5 mg/ml NAC did not cause changes in existing biofilm.

    Article Snippet: After 45 min to 1 h of incubation at room temperature to fully distain the biofilm, the absorbance was measured at 590 nm using a microtiter plate reader (Epoch Microplate Spectrophotometer, BioTek).

    Techniques: Staining, Standard Deviation, Cell Culture

    The effect of NAC on the growth of bacteria contained in biofilm. We used the culture shown in Figure 2(c) to perform this experiment. (a) NAC was applied to the culture from one side of the culture dish marked with an arrowhead. The other side of the plate where NAC was not applied is marked by a star. (b) Efficiency of NAC in penetrating the biofilm and interfering with bacterial cell growth. After 0, 1.5 h, 4 h, and 9 h NAC treatments, cells from the side where NAC was applied (arrowhead) and away from the site of application (star) were subcultured in fresh LB in a microtiter plate. 20 mg/ml NAC were able to penetrate the culture and interfere with cell growth within 1.5 h, and no cell growth was detected after 4 h treatment. 10 and 7.5 mg/ml NAC were able to penetrate the culture and completely inhibit further cell growth after 9 h post application. 5 mg/ml NAC could not inhibit cell growth. Technical duplicates were used for cell viabilities after being treated with different concentrations of NAC.

    Journal: Journal of Diabetes Research

    Article Title: N-Acetyl-cysteine and Mechanisms Involved in Resolution of Chronic Wound Biofilm

    doi: 10.1155/2020/9589507

    Figure Lengend Snippet: The effect of NAC on the growth of bacteria contained in biofilm. We used the culture shown in Figure 2(c) to perform this experiment. (a) NAC was applied to the culture from one side of the culture dish marked with an arrowhead. The other side of the plate where NAC was not applied is marked by a star. (b) Efficiency of NAC in penetrating the biofilm and interfering with bacterial cell growth. After 0, 1.5 h, 4 h, and 9 h NAC treatments, cells from the side where NAC was applied (arrowhead) and away from the site of application (star) were subcultured in fresh LB in a microtiter plate. 20 mg/ml NAC were able to penetrate the culture and interfere with cell growth within 1.5 h, and no cell growth was detected after 4 h treatment. 10 and 7.5 mg/ml NAC were able to penetrate the culture and completely inhibit further cell growth after 9 h post application. 5 mg/ml NAC could not inhibit cell growth. Technical duplicates were used for cell viabilities after being treated with different concentrations of NAC.

    Article Snippet: After 45 min to 1 h of incubation at room temperature to fully distain the biofilm, the absorbance was measured at 590 nm using a microtiter plate reader (Epoch Microplate Spectrophotometer, BioTek).

    Techniques:

    Chronic wound microbiome rich in P. aeruginosa formed strong biofilm in vitro . Microbiome rich in P. aeruginosa was collected from chronic wounds and cultured in vitro overnight. Similar cultures were performed with microbiome collected from nonchronic wound. (a) Bacterial species sequencing data using the 16S ITS region as the probe. In this particular animal, the wound became colonized with P. aeruginosa as early as day 3 postwounding and induction of chronicity. (b) Microbiome cultures in 96-well microtiter plates. Top view, side view, and side view with crystal violet staining. Microbiome from chronic wounds formed thick opaque biofilm on the air-liquid interface that can be stained with crystal violet (long arrow). Microbiome from nonchronic wounds did not form biofilm. Technical replicas of three wells of each condition. (c) Likewise, when cultured in tubes, microbiome from nonchronic wounds did not stain with crystal violet (left 2 tubes) whereas that from chronic wounds was stained with crystal violet (right 2 tubes).

    Journal: Journal of Diabetes Research

    Article Title: N-Acetyl-cysteine and Mechanisms Involved in Resolution of Chronic Wound Biofilm

    doi: 10.1155/2020/9589507

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Chronic wound microbiome rich in P. aeruginosa formed strong biofilm in vitro . Microbiome rich in P. aeruginosa was collected from chronic wounds and cultured in vitro overnight. Similar cultures were performed with microbiome collected from nonchronic wound. (a) Bacterial species sequencing data using the 16S ITS region as the probe. In this particular animal, the wound became colonized with P. aeruginosa as early as day 3 postwounding and induction of chronicity. (b) Microbiome cultures in 96-well microtiter plates. Top view, side view, and side view with crystal violet staining. Microbiome from chronic wounds formed thick opaque biofilm on the air-liquid interface that can be stained with crystal violet (long arrow). Microbiome from nonchronic wounds did not form biofilm. Technical replicas of three wells of each condition. (c) Likewise, when cultured in tubes, microbiome from nonchronic wounds did not stain with crystal violet (left 2 tubes) whereas that from chronic wounds was stained with crystal violet (right 2 tubes).

    Article Snippet: After 45 min to 1 h of incubation at room temperature to fully distain the biofilm, the absorbance was measured at 590 nm using a microtiter plate reader (Epoch Microplate Spectrophotometer, BioTek).

    Techniques: In Vitro, Cell Culture, Sequencing, Staining

    Effect of immobilized Tat molecules on adhesion of endothelial cells. A plastic surface was coated overnight at 4°C with Tat molecules or control proteins (10 μg/well) and then saturated with 1% HSA. Suspended cells (5 × 10 4 /0.1 ml) were seeded, and after a 1-h incubation at 37°C, plates were extensively washed in M199 containing 1% FCS, fixed, and stained with crystal violet. The optical density (O.D.) was read at 540 nm in a microtiter plate spectrophotometer. Results (mean and standard deviation) of one experiment (performed in quadruplicate) representative of at least four independent experiments are shown. Data were analyzed by ANOVA ( F = 71.16) and the Student-Newman-Keuls test. ∗ indicates P

    Journal: Journal of Virology

    Article Title: Identification of Specific Molecular Structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tat Relevant for Its Biological Effects on Vascular Endothelial Cells

    doi:

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Effect of immobilized Tat molecules on adhesion of endothelial cells. A plastic surface was coated overnight at 4°C with Tat molecules or control proteins (10 μg/well) and then saturated with 1% HSA. Suspended cells (5 × 10 4 /0.1 ml) were seeded, and after a 1-h incubation at 37°C, plates were extensively washed in M199 containing 1% FCS, fixed, and stained with crystal violet. The optical density (O.D.) was read at 540 nm in a microtiter plate spectrophotometer. Results (mean and standard deviation) of one experiment (performed in quadruplicate) representative of at least four independent experiments are shown. Data were analyzed by ANOVA ( F = 71.16) and the Student-Newman-Keuls test. ∗ indicates P

    Article Snippet: The absorbance was read at 540 nm in a microtiter plate spectrophotometer (EL340; Bio-Tek Instruments, Highland Park, Vt.).

    Techniques: Incubation, Staining, Spectrophotometry, Standard Deviation

    Nitroreductase (upper part) and lawsone reductase (lower part) activities of whole cells (A) and cell extracts (B and C) of various E. coli (mutant) strains which differed in their activities of the oxygen-insensitive nitroreductases NfsA and NfsB. The following E. coli strains were used (the relevant nitroreductase activities are indicated in brackets): JM83 [NfsA + NfsB + ]; JM83(pAJ13NH) [NfsA ++ NfsB + ]; SIL41 [NfsA + NfsB − ]; JM83(pNR3) [NfsA + NfsB ++ ]; JVQ1 [NfsA − NfsB + ]; JVQ2 [NfsA − NfsB − ]. The strains were grown under aerobic conditions (with ampicillin if appropriate) until they reached the late exponential growth phase. The cells were harvested by centrifugation, washed, and resuspended in Na/K-phosphate buffer (50 mM, pH 7.7). One part of these cell suspensions was used directly for anaerobic resting cell experiments in microtiter plates (A). The wells of the microtiter plates contained in 200 μl Na/K-phosphate buffer (50 mM, pH 7.7), glucose (10 mM), and nitrofurazone (0.1 mM) (upper part of the figure) or lawsone (lower part of the figure) and cells (≈0.3 to 0.6 g of protein liter −1 ). The respective second part of the cell suspensions were broken by using a French press and cell extracts prepared by ultracentrifugation. The cytosolic nitroreductase activities were determined under anaerobic conditions in microtiter plates. The reaction mixtures contained in 200 μl Na/K-phosphate buffer (50 mM, pH 7.7), and nitrofurazone (0.1 mM) (upper part of the figure) or lawsone (0.1 mM) (lower part of the figure) and 3 to 200 mg l −1 protein. The reactions were started by the addition of 0.1 mM NADH (part B) or NADPH (part C). The decrease in absorbance due to nitrofurazone (upper part) or lawsone (lower part) were determined spectrophotometrically in the microtiter plate reader at 400 or 450 nm, respectively. The protein concentrations in all cell suspensions and cell extracts were determined using the Biuret reagent. The experiment was performed three times, and the relevant standard deviations (error bars) are indicated.

    Journal: Applied and Environmental Microbiology

    Article Title: Oxygen-Insensitive Nitroreductases NfsA and NfsB of Escherichia coli Function under Anaerobic Conditions as Lawsone-Dependent Azo Reductases

    doi: 10.1128/AEM.69.6.3448-3455.2003

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Nitroreductase (upper part) and lawsone reductase (lower part) activities of whole cells (A) and cell extracts (B and C) of various E. coli (mutant) strains which differed in their activities of the oxygen-insensitive nitroreductases NfsA and NfsB. The following E. coli strains were used (the relevant nitroreductase activities are indicated in brackets): JM83 [NfsA + NfsB + ]; JM83(pAJ13NH) [NfsA ++ NfsB + ]; SIL41 [NfsA + NfsB − ]; JM83(pNR3) [NfsA + NfsB ++ ]; JVQ1 [NfsA − NfsB + ]; JVQ2 [NfsA − NfsB − ]. The strains were grown under aerobic conditions (with ampicillin if appropriate) until they reached the late exponential growth phase. The cells were harvested by centrifugation, washed, and resuspended in Na/K-phosphate buffer (50 mM, pH 7.7). One part of these cell suspensions was used directly for anaerobic resting cell experiments in microtiter plates (A). The wells of the microtiter plates contained in 200 μl Na/K-phosphate buffer (50 mM, pH 7.7), glucose (10 mM), and nitrofurazone (0.1 mM) (upper part of the figure) or lawsone (lower part of the figure) and cells (≈0.3 to 0.6 g of protein liter −1 ). The respective second part of the cell suspensions were broken by using a French press and cell extracts prepared by ultracentrifugation. The cytosolic nitroreductase activities were determined under anaerobic conditions in microtiter plates. The reaction mixtures contained in 200 μl Na/K-phosphate buffer (50 mM, pH 7.7), and nitrofurazone (0.1 mM) (upper part of the figure) or lawsone (0.1 mM) (lower part of the figure) and 3 to 200 mg l −1 protein. The reactions were started by the addition of 0.1 mM NADH (part B) or NADPH (part C). The decrease in absorbance due to nitrofurazone (upper part) or lawsone (lower part) were determined spectrophotometrically in the microtiter plate reader at 400 or 450 nm, respectively. The protein concentrations in all cell suspensions and cell extracts were determined using the Biuret reagent. The experiment was performed three times, and the relevant standard deviations (error bars) are indicated.

    Article Snippet: The microtiter plates were shaken for 5 s (17 Hz), and the reaction rates were determined spectrophotometrically using a microtiter plate reader.

    Techniques: Mutagenesis, Centrifugation