human recombinant vegf a  (PeproTech)

 
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    Name:
    Recombinant Human VEGF B
    Description:
    VEGF B a member of the VEGF family is a potent growth and angiogenic cytokine It promotes DNA synthesis in endothelial cells helps regulate angiogenesis and vascular permeability and inhibits apoptosis in certain smooth muscle cells and neurons VEGF B is expressed in all tissues except the liver It forms cell surfaced associated disulfide linked homodimers and can form heterodimers with VEGF A There are two known isoforms formed by alternative splicing which have been designated VEGF B167 and VEGF B186 Both forms have identical amino terminal sequences encoding a cysteine knot like structural motif but differ in their carboxyl terminal domains Both VEGF B isoforms signal only through the VEGFR1 receptor Recombinant human VEGF B is a 38 0 kDa disulfide linked homodimeric protein consisting of two 167 amino acid polypeptide chains
    Catalog Number:
    100-20B-100UG
    Price:
    780.00
    Category:
    Recombinant Proteins
    Source:
    E.coli
    Purity:
    98.0
    Quantity:
    100UG
    Buy from Supplier


    Structured Review

    PeproTech human recombinant vegf a
    VEGFR2/Stat-3 pathway is involved in <t>VEGF-A-induced</t> resistance to anti-EGFR therapy ( A ) Western blot analysis performed on SW48 colon cancer cell line. Cells were stimulated with human recombinant VEGF-A (5 ng/mL) and with or without axitinib or STA-21 during 24 hours. Cetuximab was added the following day for 24 hours. α-tubulin was used as loading control (Co: Control). ( B ) Cell proliferation analyzed by crystal violet staining. Colon cancer cell lines were incubated or not with human recombinant VEGF-A (5 ng/mL) and STA-21 (10 μM) or axitinib (500 pM) were concomitantly added. Cetuximab (500μg/mL) was added the following day in culture medium and cell death was analyzed 7 days later. (* p
    VEGF B a member of the VEGF family is a potent growth and angiogenic cytokine It promotes DNA synthesis in endothelial cells helps regulate angiogenesis and vascular permeability and inhibits apoptosis in certain smooth muscle cells and neurons VEGF B is expressed in all tissues except the liver It forms cell surfaced associated disulfide linked homodimers and can form heterodimers with VEGF A There are two known isoforms formed by alternative splicing which have been designated VEGF B167 and VEGF B186 Both forms have identical amino terminal sequences encoding a cysteine knot like structural motif but differ in their carboxyl terminal domains Both VEGF B isoforms signal only through the VEGFR1 receptor Recombinant human VEGF B is a 38 0 kDa disulfide linked homodimeric protein consisting of two 167 amino acid polypeptide chains
    https://www.bioz.com/result/human recombinant vegf a/product/PeproTech
    Average 96 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    human recombinant vegf a - by Bioz Stars, 2021-04
    96/100 stars

    Images

    1) Product Images from "Does bevacizumab impact anti-EGFR therapy efficacy in metastatic colorectal cancer?"

    Article Title: Does bevacizumab impact anti-EGFR therapy efficacy in metastatic colorectal cancer?

    Journal: Oncotarget

    doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.7008

    VEGFR2/Stat-3 pathway is involved in VEGF-A-induced resistance to anti-EGFR therapy ( A ) Western blot analysis performed on SW48 colon cancer cell line. Cells were stimulated with human recombinant VEGF-A (5 ng/mL) and with or without axitinib or STA-21 during 24 hours. Cetuximab was added the following day for 24 hours. α-tubulin was used as loading control (Co: Control). ( B ) Cell proliferation analyzed by crystal violet staining. Colon cancer cell lines were incubated or not with human recombinant VEGF-A (5 ng/mL) and STA-21 (10 μM) or axitinib (500 pM) were concomitantly added. Cetuximab (500μg/mL) was added the following day in culture medium and cell death was analyzed 7 days later. (* p
    Figure Legend Snippet: VEGFR2/Stat-3 pathway is involved in VEGF-A-induced resistance to anti-EGFR therapy ( A ) Western blot analysis performed on SW48 colon cancer cell line. Cells were stimulated with human recombinant VEGF-A (5 ng/mL) and with or without axitinib or STA-21 during 24 hours. Cetuximab was added the following day for 24 hours. α-tubulin was used as loading control (Co: Control). ( B ) Cell proliferation analyzed by crystal violet staining. Colon cancer cell lines were incubated or not with human recombinant VEGF-A (5 ng/mL) and STA-21 (10 μM) or axitinib (500 pM) were concomitantly added. Cetuximab (500μg/mL) was added the following day in culture medium and cell death was analyzed 7 days later. (* p

    Techniques Used: Western Blot, Recombinant, Staining, Incubation

    VEGF-A is increased in patients’ serum during anti-VEGF therapy VEGF-A serum level from mCRC patients ( n = 26) treated with FOLFOX/bevacizumab chemotherapy protocol red lines) compared to patients ( n = 12) treated with chemotherapy alone (blue lines). Assays were performed before and 15 days after bevacizumab injection and analyzed by ELISA. (* p
    Figure Legend Snippet: VEGF-A is increased in patients’ serum during anti-VEGF therapy VEGF-A serum level from mCRC patients ( n = 26) treated with FOLFOX/bevacizumab chemotherapy protocol red lines) compared to patients ( n = 12) treated with chemotherapy alone (blue lines). Assays were performed before and 15 days after bevacizumab injection and analyzed by ELISA. (* p

    Techniques Used: Injection, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay

    VEGF-A can inhibit cetuximab cytoxicity in vitro ( A ) Western Blot analysis showing VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and EGFR expression. HCS-70 was used as loading control and as a reference for EGFR quantification (a.u: arbitrary unit). ( B ) Cell proliferation analyzed by crystal violet staining. SW48, Caco-2 and Colo320 colon cancer cell lines were incubated or not with increasing dose of human recombinant VEGF-A (0,5 or 5 ng/mL). Cetuximab (500 μg/mL) was added the following day in culture medium and cell death was analyzed 7 days later. ( C ) Annexin V/7AAD staining. Cells were incubated with VEGF-A 5 ng/mL. Cetuximab 500 μg/mL was added the following day. Cell death was evaluated 24 hours after cetuximab was added, AnnexinV positive cells are in black boxes, double positive cells are in white boxes (* p
    Figure Legend Snippet: VEGF-A can inhibit cetuximab cytoxicity in vitro ( A ) Western Blot analysis showing VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and EGFR expression. HCS-70 was used as loading control and as a reference for EGFR quantification (a.u: arbitrary unit). ( B ) Cell proliferation analyzed by crystal violet staining. SW48, Caco-2 and Colo320 colon cancer cell lines were incubated or not with increasing dose of human recombinant VEGF-A (0,5 or 5 ng/mL). Cetuximab (500 μg/mL) was added the following day in culture medium and cell death was analyzed 7 days later. ( C ) Annexin V/7AAD staining. Cells were incubated with VEGF-A 5 ng/mL. Cetuximab 500 μg/mL was added the following day. Cell death was evaluated 24 hours after cetuximab was added, AnnexinV positive cells are in black boxes, double positive cells are in white boxes (* p

    Techniques Used: In Vitro, Western Blot, Expressing, Staining, Incubation, Recombinant

    Related Articles

    Recombinant:

    Article Title: Angiogenic growth factors augment K–Cl cotransporter expression in erythroid cells via hypoxia-inducible factor-1α
    Article Snippet: Cell c ulture and r eagents K562, a human erythroid cell line obtained from American Type Cell Culture (Manasa, WA), was cultured in RPMI 1640 medium containing 10% heat inactivated fetal bovine serum. .. Unless otherwise indicated, K562 cells were kept overnight in serum-free medium, prior to treatment with human recombinant VEGF (250 ng/ml) or PlGF (250 ng/ml) (Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ), as previously described . .. Diphenyliodonium chloride (DPI), LY294002, PD98059, SP600125, rapamycin, and SB203580 were obtained from Tocris Biosciences (Ellisville, MO).

    Article Title: Increased antiparkinson efficacy of the combined administration of VEGF- and GDNF-loaded nanospheres in a partial lesion model of Parkinson's disease
    Article Snippet: .. Preparation of NS Recombinant human VEGF (PeproTech, London, UK) and recombinant murine GDNF (Peprotech) enclosing PLGA (50:50; lactic/glycolic [%]) (Resomer® RG 503; Boehringer Ingelheim, Ingelheim, Germany) NS were prepared as previously described. .. Briefly, 133 mg PLGA 50:50 (previously sterilized by gamma radiation) were dissolved in 3.33 mL dichloromethane and emulsified with 200 μL of 0.15% w/v recombinant human VEGF or recombinant murine GDNF aqueous solution (containing 7% [w/v] human serum albumin and 2.5% [w/v] poly-ethylene-glycol 400) by probe sonication for 30 seconds at 50 W (Branson® Sonifier® 250, Biogen, Derio, Spain).

    Article Title: Hypoxia Enhances Proliferation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells via HIF-1ɑ Activation
    Article Snippet: PD98059, an inhibitor of the MEK pathway, LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt, and SB203580, an inhibitor of p38, were from Calbiochem Novabiochem (San Diego, CA). .. Recombinant human VEGF and FGF–2 were purchased from PeproTech Ltd. (London, UK). ..

    Article Title: Integrin β4 Signaling Promotes Mammary Tumor Cell Adhesion to Brain Microvascular Endothelium by Inducing ErbB2-mediated Secretion of VEGF
    Article Snippet: PBS was from Mediatech Inc. (Manassas, VA). .. 4′, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) was from Invitrogen (Carlsbad, CA) Human recombinant VEGF165 and VEGF receptor (KDR/Flk-1) inhibitor, SU-1498, were obtained from Peprotech (Rocky Hill, NJ) and Alomone labs (Jerusalem, Israel), respectively. ..

    Article Title: Generation and Characterization of Telomerase-Transfected Human Lymphatic Endothelial Cells with an Extended Life Span
    Article Snippet: Overall, a comparison of the panel of markers expressed by and functional characteristics of hTERT-HDLEC with the current LEC and BEC profiles, suggests that these cells are LEC. .. Recombinant human VEGF-A (165aa isoform) was purchased from PeproTech Inc. (Rocky Hill, NJ). .. Recombinant human FGF-2 was provided by Dr. P. Sarmientos (Farmitalia Carlo Erba, Milan, Italy), VEGF-CΔNΔC (designated VEGF-C from hereon) was provided by Dr. M. Skobe (Cancer Center, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York), and mutant VEGF-C156 was provided by Dr. K. Alitalo (Biomedicum, Helsinki, Finland).

    Article Title: Interleukin 17 and peripheral IL-17-expressing T cells are negatively correlated with the overall survival of head and neck cancer patients
    Article Snippet: The SAS and OC3 cell lines were kindly provided by Professor Yu-Sun Chang, and the OECM-1 cell line was provided by Professor Ching-Ping Tseng (Graduate Institute of Biomedical Science, Chang Gung University, Taiwan). .. For the OSCC cells proliferation assay, the OSCC cell lines were seeded in 6-well plates supplemented with recombinant human IL-17 (rhIL-17) or in 96-well plates with recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) or recombinant VEGF-A (Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ, USA) for 24–48 h, and the proliferation rates were analyzed by cell counting using trypan blue or 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. .. To determine the effects of IL-6 or VEGF-A on IL-17 treated OSCC cells, the neutralizing antibodies were utilized, including rat anti-IL-6 mAb (Cat. No. 50110, BioLegend, San Diego, CA, USA) and mouse anti-VEGF mAb (MAB293, R & D Systems, Minneapolis, MN, USA).

    Proliferation Assay:

    Article Title: Interleukin 17 and peripheral IL-17-expressing T cells are negatively correlated with the overall survival of head and neck cancer patients
    Article Snippet: The SAS and OC3 cell lines were kindly provided by Professor Yu-Sun Chang, and the OECM-1 cell line was provided by Professor Ching-Ping Tseng (Graduate Institute of Biomedical Science, Chang Gung University, Taiwan). .. For the OSCC cells proliferation assay, the OSCC cell lines were seeded in 6-well plates supplemented with recombinant human IL-17 (rhIL-17) or in 96-well plates with recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) or recombinant VEGF-A (Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ, USA) for 24–48 h, and the proliferation rates were analyzed by cell counting using trypan blue or 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. .. To determine the effects of IL-6 or VEGF-A on IL-17 treated OSCC cells, the neutralizing antibodies were utilized, including rat anti-IL-6 mAb (Cat. No. 50110, BioLegend, San Diego, CA, USA) and mouse anti-VEGF mAb (MAB293, R & D Systems, Minneapolis, MN, USA).

    Cell Counting:

    Article Title: Interleukin 17 and peripheral IL-17-expressing T cells are negatively correlated with the overall survival of head and neck cancer patients
    Article Snippet: The SAS and OC3 cell lines were kindly provided by Professor Yu-Sun Chang, and the OECM-1 cell line was provided by Professor Ching-Ping Tseng (Graduate Institute of Biomedical Science, Chang Gung University, Taiwan). .. For the OSCC cells proliferation assay, the OSCC cell lines were seeded in 6-well plates supplemented with recombinant human IL-17 (rhIL-17) or in 96-well plates with recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) or recombinant VEGF-A (Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ, USA) for 24–48 h, and the proliferation rates were analyzed by cell counting using trypan blue or 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. .. To determine the effects of IL-6 or VEGF-A on IL-17 treated OSCC cells, the neutralizing antibodies were utilized, including rat anti-IL-6 mAb (Cat. No. 50110, BioLegend, San Diego, CA, USA) and mouse anti-VEGF mAb (MAB293, R & D Systems, Minneapolis, MN, USA).

    MTT Assay:

    Article Title: Interleukin 17 and peripheral IL-17-expressing T cells are negatively correlated with the overall survival of head and neck cancer patients
    Article Snippet: The SAS and OC3 cell lines were kindly provided by Professor Yu-Sun Chang, and the OECM-1 cell line was provided by Professor Ching-Ping Tseng (Graduate Institute of Biomedical Science, Chang Gung University, Taiwan). .. For the OSCC cells proliferation assay, the OSCC cell lines were seeded in 6-well plates supplemented with recombinant human IL-17 (rhIL-17) or in 96-well plates with recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) or recombinant VEGF-A (Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ, USA) for 24–48 h, and the proliferation rates were analyzed by cell counting using trypan blue or 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. .. To determine the effects of IL-6 or VEGF-A on IL-17 treated OSCC cells, the neutralizing antibodies were utilized, including rat anti-IL-6 mAb (Cat. No. 50110, BioLegend, San Diego, CA, USA) and mouse anti-VEGF mAb (MAB293, R & D Systems, Minneapolis, MN, USA).

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  • 96
    PeproTech human vegf
    Total Tubule Length built by investigated implants. <t>VEGF-functionalized</t> titanium-PCL implants showed significantly the best results for the characteristic Total Tubule Length. VEGF + <t>HMGB1-functionalized</t> titanium-PCL implants showed a significantly higher Total Tubule Length than titanium-PCL implants and HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants, but comparable results to pure titanium implants. Pure titanium implants were significantly better than titanium-PCL implants and HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants. F -test from the analyses of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the Least Significant Difference test were used ( p ≤ 0.05).
    Human Vegf, supplied by PeproTech, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 96/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/human vegf/product/PeproTech
    Average 96 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    human vegf - by Bioz Stars, 2021-04
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    96
    PeproTech human vegf a
    Treatment with EA inhibits T24 bladder cancer cell invasion in response to <t>VEGF-A,</t> but not to EGF. Invasion of T24 cells (2 × 10 5 cells/chamber, 2 h incubation), non-stimulated (CTR) or exposed to EA IC 25 (10 µM) in response to VEGF-A (50 ng/mL) or to EGF (50 ng/mL), was tested in Boyden chambers containing matrigel coated filters. Invading cells were counted in six random microscopic fields for each experimental condition. The histogram represents the arithmetic mean values of migrated cells/microscopic field ± SD of three independent determinations. Results of the statistical analysis performed by one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni’s post-test for multiple comparison, were as follows: VEGF-A vs. CTR or EA, p
    Human Vegf A, supplied by PeproTech, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 96/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/human vegf a/product/PeproTech
    Average 96 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    human vegf a - by Bioz Stars, 2021-04
    96/100 stars
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    94
    PeproTech recombinant human vegf c
    Effect of MSC‐CM on LEC sprouting. LEC spheroids were embedded in collagen or fibrin gels and treated with <t>VEGF‐C</t> combined with bFGF and 100% MSC‐CM. PMA served as positive control, basal medium supplemented with 0.5% FCS as negative control. (A) Spheroids were grown in hanging drop culture. (B) Representative images of spheroids treated with different stimulations after 24 h. (C) Sprout length and number of spheroids treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis) were quantified and displayed in bar graphs. (n = 2, duplicates, * P ≤ .05 compared to negative control)
    Recombinant Human Vegf C, supplied by PeproTech, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 94/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/recombinant human vegf c/product/PeproTech
    Average 94 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    recombinant human vegf c - by Bioz Stars, 2021-04
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    Image Search Results


    Total Tubule Length built by investigated implants. VEGF-functionalized titanium-PCL implants showed significantly the best results for the characteristic Total Tubule Length. VEGF + HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants showed a significantly higher Total Tubule Length than titanium-PCL implants and HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants, but comparable results to pure titanium implants. Pure titanium implants were significantly better than titanium-PCL implants and HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants. F -test from the analyses of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the Least Significant Difference test were used ( p ≤ 0.05).

    Journal: Materials

    Article Title: Evaluation of Functionalized Porous Titanium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Vitro

    doi: 10.3390/ma9040304

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Total Tubule Length built by investigated implants. VEGF-functionalized titanium-PCL implants showed significantly the best results for the characteristic Total Tubule Length. VEGF + HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants showed a significantly higher Total Tubule Length than titanium-PCL implants and HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants, but comparable results to pure titanium implants. Pure titanium implants were significantly better than titanium-PCL implants and HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants. F -test from the analyses of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the Least Significant Difference test were used ( p ≤ 0.05).

    Article Snippet: Human VEGF (450-32, Peprotech, Hamburg, Germany) and HMGB1 (H4652, Sigma-Aldrich, Taufkirchen, Germany) were incorporated in polymer coatings by sorption.

    Techniques:

    Released amounts of VEGF. Releasing kinetics of VEGF from titanium implants coated with PCL and functionalized with VEGF and from titanium implants coated with PCL and functionalized with VEGF and HMGB1 (dashed lines).

    Journal: Materials

    Article Title: Evaluation of Functionalized Porous Titanium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Vitro

    doi: 10.3390/ma9040304

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Released amounts of VEGF. Releasing kinetics of VEGF from titanium implants coated with PCL and functionalized with VEGF and from titanium implants coated with PCL and functionalized with VEGF and HMGB1 (dashed lines).

    Article Snippet: Human VEGF (450-32, Peprotech, Hamburg, Germany) and HMGB1 (H4652, Sigma-Aldrich, Taufkirchen, Germany) were incorporated in polymer coatings by sorption.

    Techniques:

    Results of Angiogenesis Assay with proangiogenic cytokines VEGF and HMGB1. Angiogenesis Assay with VEGF at a steady concentration of 10 ng/mL ( n = 4) and a declining concentration of 117 ng/mL on day 2, 16 ng/mL on day 5, 7 ng/mL on day 8 and 6 ng/mL on day 11 ( n = 4), respectively. HMGB1 was used at a steady concentration of 100 ng/mL ( n = 4) and a declining concentration of 924 ng/mL at day 2, 130 ng/mL at day 5, 76 ng/mL at day 8 and 24 ng/mL at day 11, respectively. Results for Total Number of Junctions ( A ); Total Number of Tubules ( B ); Total Tubule Length (µm) ( C ); and Total Number of Nets ( D ) were analyzed using F -test from the analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the use of the Least Significant Difference ( p ≤ 0.05). Both, VEGF using a concentration of 10 ng/mL and the declining concentrations, showed an angiogenesis stimulating effect. The steady concentration of 10 ng/mL showed significantly more tubules and junction formation than the declining concentrations. Neither the constant concentration of 100 ng/mL HMGB1 nor the declining concentrations of HMGB1 showed an angiogenesis stimulating effect.

    Journal: Materials

    Article Title: Evaluation of Functionalized Porous Titanium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Vitro

    doi: 10.3390/ma9040304

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Results of Angiogenesis Assay with proangiogenic cytokines VEGF and HMGB1. Angiogenesis Assay with VEGF at a steady concentration of 10 ng/mL ( n = 4) and a declining concentration of 117 ng/mL on day 2, 16 ng/mL on day 5, 7 ng/mL on day 8 and 6 ng/mL on day 11 ( n = 4), respectively. HMGB1 was used at a steady concentration of 100 ng/mL ( n = 4) and a declining concentration of 924 ng/mL at day 2, 130 ng/mL at day 5, 76 ng/mL at day 8 and 24 ng/mL at day 11, respectively. Results for Total Number of Junctions ( A ); Total Number of Tubules ( B ); Total Tubule Length (µm) ( C ); and Total Number of Nets ( D ) were analyzed using F -test from the analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the use of the Least Significant Difference ( p ≤ 0.05). Both, VEGF using a concentration of 10 ng/mL and the declining concentrations, showed an angiogenesis stimulating effect. The steady concentration of 10 ng/mL showed significantly more tubules and junction formation than the declining concentrations. Neither the constant concentration of 100 ng/mL HMGB1 nor the declining concentrations of HMGB1 showed an angiogenesis stimulating effect.

    Article Snippet: Human VEGF (450-32, Peprotech, Hamburg, Germany) and HMGB1 (H4652, Sigma-Aldrich, Taufkirchen, Germany) were incorporated in polymer coatings by sorption.

    Techniques: Angiogenesis Assay, Concentration Assay

    Migration Assay with GM7373 and supernatants from functionalized implants. Comparison of chemotactic behavior of the endothelial cell line (GM7373) using supernatants from implants functionalized with VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), HMGB1 (high mobility group box 1) and a combination of HMGB1/VEGF. All of the functionalized implants showed significantly higher chemotaxis than DMEM with 20% FCS or 0.1% FCS. VEGF was significantly more chemotactic than the combination of VEGF + HMGB1. F -test from the analyses of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the Least Significant Difference test were used ( p ≤ 0.05).

    Journal: Materials

    Article Title: Evaluation of Functionalized Porous Titanium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Vitro

    doi: 10.3390/ma9040304

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Migration Assay with GM7373 and supernatants from functionalized implants. Comparison of chemotactic behavior of the endothelial cell line (GM7373) using supernatants from implants functionalized with VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), HMGB1 (high mobility group box 1) and a combination of HMGB1/VEGF. All of the functionalized implants showed significantly higher chemotaxis than DMEM with 20% FCS or 0.1% FCS. VEGF was significantly more chemotactic than the combination of VEGF + HMGB1. F -test from the analyses of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the Least Significant Difference test were used ( p ≤ 0.05).

    Article Snippet: Human VEGF (450-32, Peprotech, Hamburg, Germany) and HMGB1 (H4652, Sigma-Aldrich, Taufkirchen, Germany) were incorporated in polymer coatings by sorption.

    Techniques: Migration, Chemotaxis Assay

    Number of Tubules built by investigated implants. VEGF-functionalized titanium-PCL implants built significantly more tubules than all of the other implants. VEGF + HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants showed significantly more tubules than titanium-PCL implants and HMGB1 functionalized titanium-PCL implants. Pure titanium implants showed better results than titanium-PCL implants. F -test from the analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the Least Significant Difference test were used ( p ≤ 0.05).

    Journal: Materials

    Article Title: Evaluation of Functionalized Porous Titanium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Vitro

    doi: 10.3390/ma9040304

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Number of Tubules built by investigated implants. VEGF-functionalized titanium-PCL implants built significantly more tubules than all of the other implants. VEGF + HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants showed significantly more tubules than titanium-PCL implants and HMGB1 functionalized titanium-PCL implants. Pure titanium implants showed better results than titanium-PCL implants. F -test from the analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the Least Significant Difference test were used ( p ≤ 0.05).

    Article Snippet: Human VEGF (450-32, Peprotech, Hamburg, Germany) and HMGB1 (H4652, Sigma-Aldrich, Taufkirchen, Germany) were incorporated in polymer coatings by sorption.

    Techniques:

    Tubuli and Nets visible after Angiogenesis Assay. After staining with BCIP/NBT-Substrate, tubuli and net-structures became visible. ( A ) Titanium implant functionalized with VEGF; ( B ) titanium implant functionalized with HMGB1; and ( C ) titanium implant functionalized with a combination of VEGF + HMGB1.

    Journal: Materials

    Article Title: Evaluation of Functionalized Porous Titanium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Vitro

    doi: 10.3390/ma9040304

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Tubuli and Nets visible after Angiogenesis Assay. After staining with BCIP/NBT-Substrate, tubuli and net-structures became visible. ( A ) Titanium implant functionalized with VEGF; ( B ) titanium implant functionalized with HMGB1; and ( C ) titanium implant functionalized with a combination of VEGF + HMGB1.

    Article Snippet: Human VEGF (450-32, Peprotech, Hamburg, Germany) and HMGB1 (H4652, Sigma-Aldrich, Taufkirchen, Germany) were incorporated in polymer coatings by sorption.

    Techniques: Angiogenesis Assay, Staining

    Number of Junctions built due to the investigated implant. VEGF-functionalized titanium-PCL implants showed significantly more junctions than all of the other implants. VEGF + HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants built significantly more junctions than pure titanium implants, titanium implants coated with PCL and HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants. Significantly more junctions could be seen in wells with pure titanium implants than in wells with titanium-PCL implants. F -test from the analyses of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the Least Significant Difference test were used ( p ≤ 0.05).

    Journal: Materials

    Article Title: Evaluation of Functionalized Porous Titanium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Vitro

    doi: 10.3390/ma9040304

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Number of Junctions built due to the investigated implant. VEGF-functionalized titanium-PCL implants showed significantly more junctions than all of the other implants. VEGF + HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants built significantly more junctions than pure titanium implants, titanium implants coated with PCL and HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants. Significantly more junctions could be seen in wells with pure titanium implants than in wells with titanium-PCL implants. F -test from the analyses of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the Least Significant Difference test were used ( p ≤ 0.05).

    Article Snippet: Human VEGF (450-32, Peprotech, Hamburg, Germany) and HMGB1 (H4652, Sigma-Aldrich, Taufkirchen, Germany) were incorporated in polymer coatings by sorption.

    Techniques:

    Released amounts of HMGB1. Releasing kinetics of HMGB1 from titanium implants coated with PCL and functionalized with HMGB1 and from titanium implants coated with PCL and functionalized with VEGF and HMGB1 (dashed lines). The concentration of HMGB1 released from titanium PCL scaffold HMGB1 3 (green line) was above the detection limit of 1668 ng/mL at day 5. Therefore, no result for this day can be shown.

    Journal: Materials

    Article Title: Evaluation of Functionalized Porous Titanium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Vitro

    doi: 10.3390/ma9040304

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Released amounts of HMGB1. Releasing kinetics of HMGB1 from titanium implants coated with PCL and functionalized with HMGB1 and from titanium implants coated with PCL and functionalized with VEGF and HMGB1 (dashed lines). The concentration of HMGB1 released from titanium PCL scaffold HMGB1 3 (green line) was above the detection limit of 1668 ng/mL at day 5. Therefore, no result for this day can be shown.

    Article Snippet: Human VEGF (450-32, Peprotech, Hamburg, Germany) and HMGB1 (H4652, Sigma-Aldrich, Taufkirchen, Germany) were incorporated in polymer coatings by sorption.

    Techniques: Concentration Assay

    Number of Nets built by investigated implants. VEGF-functionalized titanium-PCL implants lead to significantly more building of net-like structures than all of the other titanium implants with or without cytokines in the assay. VEGF + HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants built significantly more nets than pure titanium implants, titanium-PCL implants and HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants. F -test from the analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the Least Significant Difference test were used ( p ≤ 0.05).

    Journal: Materials

    Article Title: Evaluation of Functionalized Porous Titanium Implants for Enhancing Angiogenesis in Vitro

    doi: 10.3390/ma9040304

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Number of Nets built by investigated implants. VEGF-functionalized titanium-PCL implants lead to significantly more building of net-like structures than all of the other titanium implants with or without cytokines in the assay. VEGF + HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants built significantly more nets than pure titanium implants, titanium-PCL implants and HMGB1-functionalized titanium-PCL implants. F -test from the analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple means comparisons with the Least Significant Difference test were used ( p ≤ 0.05).

    Article Snippet: Human VEGF (450-32, Peprotech, Hamburg, Germany) and HMGB1 (H4652, Sigma-Aldrich, Taufkirchen, Germany) were incorporated in polymer coatings by sorption.

    Techniques:

    Treatment with EA inhibits T24 bladder cancer cell invasion in response to VEGF-A, but not to EGF. Invasion of T24 cells (2 × 10 5 cells/chamber, 2 h incubation), non-stimulated (CTR) or exposed to EA IC 25 (10 µM) in response to VEGF-A (50 ng/mL) or to EGF (50 ng/mL), was tested in Boyden chambers containing matrigel coated filters. Invading cells were counted in six random microscopic fields for each experimental condition. The histogram represents the arithmetic mean values of migrated cells/microscopic field ± SD of three independent determinations. Results of the statistical analysis performed by one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni’s post-test for multiple comparison, were as follows: VEGF-A vs. CTR or EA, p

    Journal: Nutrients

    Article Title: Ellagic Acid Inhibits Bladder Cancer Invasiveness and In Vivo Tumor Growth

    doi: 10.3390/nu8110744

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Treatment with EA inhibits T24 bladder cancer cell invasion in response to VEGF-A, but not to EGF. Invasion of T24 cells (2 × 10 5 cells/chamber, 2 h incubation), non-stimulated (CTR) or exposed to EA IC 25 (10 µM) in response to VEGF-A (50 ng/mL) or to EGF (50 ng/mL), was tested in Boyden chambers containing matrigel coated filters. Invading cells were counted in six random microscopic fields for each experimental condition. The histogram represents the arithmetic mean values of migrated cells/microscopic field ± SD of three independent determinations. Results of the statistical analysis performed by one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni’s post-test for multiple comparison, were as follows: VEGF-A vs. CTR or EA, p

    Article Snippet: Invasion medium (200 μL), containing or not human VEGF-A (50 ng/mL; Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ, USA) or, in selected experiments, epidermal growth factor (EGF) (50 ng/mL; Peprotech), was added to the lower compartment of the chambers.

    Techniques: Incubation

    Treatment with EA inhibits migration of UM-UC-3 cells in response to VEGF-A but not to EGF. Migration of UM-UC-3 cells (2 × 10 5 cells/chamber, 18 h incubation), non-stimulated (CTR) or exposed to EA IC 25 (20 µM) in response to VEGF-A or EGF (50 ng/mL) was tested in Boyden chambers containing gelatin coated filters. Migrating cells were counted in six random microscopic fields for each experimental condition. The histogram represents the arithmetic mean values of migrated cells/microscopic field ± SD of three independent determinations. Results of the statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni’s post-test, were as follows: VEGF-A vs. CTR or EA, p

    Journal: Nutrients

    Article Title: Ellagic Acid Inhibits Bladder Cancer Invasiveness and In Vivo Tumor Growth

    doi: 10.3390/nu8110744

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Treatment with EA inhibits migration of UM-UC-3 cells in response to VEGF-A but not to EGF. Migration of UM-UC-3 cells (2 × 10 5 cells/chamber, 18 h incubation), non-stimulated (CTR) or exposed to EA IC 25 (20 µM) in response to VEGF-A or EGF (50 ng/mL) was tested in Boyden chambers containing gelatin coated filters. Migrating cells were counted in six random microscopic fields for each experimental condition. The histogram represents the arithmetic mean values of migrated cells/microscopic field ± SD of three independent determinations. Results of the statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni’s post-test, were as follows: VEGF-A vs. CTR or EA, p

    Article Snippet: Invasion medium (200 μL), containing or not human VEGF-A (50 ng/mL; Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ, USA) or, in selected experiments, epidermal growth factor (EGF) (50 ng/mL; Peprotech), was added to the lower compartment of the chambers.

    Techniques: Migration, Incubation

    Inhibitory effect of EA on UM-UC-3 cell invasion in response to VEGF-A. Matrigel invasion assay. Invasion of UM-UC-3 cells (2 × 10 5 cells/chamber, 4 h incubation), non-stimulated (CTR) or exposed to EA IC 25 (20 µM) in response to VEGF-A (50 ng/mL) was tested in Boyden chambers containing matrigel coated filters ( A , B ) or by spheroid invasion assay ( C , D ). For matrigel invasion test, invading cells were counted in six random microscopic fields for each experimental condition. Histogram represents the arithmetic mean values of migrated cells/microscopic field ± SD of three independent determinations. Results of the statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni’s post-test, were as follows: VEGF-A vs. CTR or EA, p

    Journal: Nutrients

    Article Title: Ellagic Acid Inhibits Bladder Cancer Invasiveness and In Vivo Tumor Growth

    doi: 10.3390/nu8110744

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Inhibitory effect of EA on UM-UC-3 cell invasion in response to VEGF-A. Matrigel invasion assay. Invasion of UM-UC-3 cells (2 × 10 5 cells/chamber, 4 h incubation), non-stimulated (CTR) or exposed to EA IC 25 (20 µM) in response to VEGF-A (50 ng/mL) was tested in Boyden chambers containing matrigel coated filters ( A , B ) or by spheroid invasion assay ( C , D ). For matrigel invasion test, invading cells were counted in six random microscopic fields for each experimental condition. Histogram represents the arithmetic mean values of migrated cells/microscopic field ± SD of three independent determinations. Results of the statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni’s post-test, were as follows: VEGF-A vs. CTR or EA, p

    Article Snippet: Invasion medium (200 μL), containing or not human VEGF-A (50 ng/mL; Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ, USA) or, in selected experiments, epidermal growth factor (EGF) (50 ng/mL; Peprotech), was added to the lower compartment of the chambers.

    Techniques: Invasion Assay, Incubation

    Treatment with EA reduces VEGFR-2 expression. ( A ) VEGF-A levels released in tumor cell culture supernatants. Quantification of the amount of VEGF-A in the concentrated supernatants of bladder cancer cell lines was performed using Maxisorp Nunc immunoplates coated with goat anti-VEGF-A IgGs. Results are the mean (± SD) of three independent determinations; ( B ) Immunoblot analysis of VEGFR-2. Western blot analysis of the levels of VEGFR-2 expressed in control (CTR) and in bladder cancer cell lines, treated with a vehicle (CTR) or exposed to EA for 24 h, at concentrations in the range of IC 50 values for each cell line (i.e., 20 µM, T24; 40 µM, UM-UC-3; 27 µM 5637; 60 µM HT-1376). HUVEC were loaded as a positive control and β-actin as a loading control; ( C ) Densitometric analysis. The relative levels of VEGFR-2 were calculated by densitometric analysis and normalized using β-actin expression in each sample. The histogram represents the ratios between the optical densities (O.D.) of VEGFR-2 in CTR or EA treated groups and β-actin. Results are the mean (±SD) of three independent experiments. Student’s t -test analysis: EA vs. CTR, p

    Journal: Nutrients

    Article Title: Ellagic Acid Inhibits Bladder Cancer Invasiveness and In Vivo Tumor Growth

    doi: 10.3390/nu8110744

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Treatment with EA reduces VEGFR-2 expression. ( A ) VEGF-A levels released in tumor cell culture supernatants. Quantification of the amount of VEGF-A in the concentrated supernatants of bladder cancer cell lines was performed using Maxisorp Nunc immunoplates coated with goat anti-VEGF-A IgGs. Results are the mean (± SD) of three independent determinations; ( B ) Immunoblot analysis of VEGFR-2. Western blot analysis of the levels of VEGFR-2 expressed in control (CTR) and in bladder cancer cell lines, treated with a vehicle (CTR) or exposed to EA for 24 h, at concentrations in the range of IC 50 values for each cell line (i.e., 20 µM, T24; 40 µM, UM-UC-3; 27 µM 5637; 60 µM HT-1376). HUVEC were loaded as a positive control and β-actin as a loading control; ( C ) Densitometric analysis. The relative levels of VEGFR-2 were calculated by densitometric analysis and normalized using β-actin expression in each sample. The histogram represents the ratios between the optical densities (O.D.) of VEGFR-2 in CTR or EA treated groups and β-actin. Results are the mean (±SD) of three independent experiments. Student’s t -test analysis: EA vs. CTR, p

    Article Snippet: Invasion medium (200 μL), containing or not human VEGF-A (50 ng/mL; Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ, USA) or, in selected experiments, epidermal growth factor (EGF) (50 ng/mL; Peprotech), was added to the lower compartment of the chambers.

    Techniques: Expressing, Cell Culture, Western Blot, Positive Control

    Inhibitory effect of EA on 5637 and HT-1376 cell invasion in response to VEGF-A. Invasion of 5637 ( A , C ) and HT-1376 ( B , D ) cells (2 × 10 5 cells/chamber, 18 h incubation), non-stimulated (CTR) or exposed to EA IC 25 of each cell line (13.5 µM for 5637 cells and 30 µM for HT-1376) in response to VEGF-A (50 ng/mL) was tested in Boyden chambers containing matrigel coated filters. Invading cells were counted in six random microscopic fields for each experimental condition. Histograms represent the arithmetic mean values of migrated cells/microscopic field ± SD of three independent determinations. Results of the statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni’s post-test, were as follows for both cell lines: VEGF-A vs. CTR or EA, p

    Journal: Nutrients

    Article Title: Ellagic Acid Inhibits Bladder Cancer Invasiveness and In Vivo Tumor Growth

    doi: 10.3390/nu8110744

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Inhibitory effect of EA on 5637 and HT-1376 cell invasion in response to VEGF-A. Invasion of 5637 ( A , C ) and HT-1376 ( B , D ) cells (2 × 10 5 cells/chamber, 18 h incubation), non-stimulated (CTR) or exposed to EA IC 25 of each cell line (13.5 µM for 5637 cells and 30 µM for HT-1376) in response to VEGF-A (50 ng/mL) was tested in Boyden chambers containing matrigel coated filters. Invading cells were counted in six random microscopic fields for each experimental condition. Histograms represent the arithmetic mean values of migrated cells/microscopic field ± SD of three independent determinations. Results of the statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni’s post-test, were as follows for both cell lines: VEGF-A vs. CTR or EA, p

    Article Snippet: Invasion medium (200 μL), containing or not human VEGF-A (50 ng/mL; Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ, USA) or, in selected experiments, epidermal growth factor (EGF) (50 ng/mL; Peprotech), was added to the lower compartment of the chambers.

    Techniques: Incubation

    IL-17 induces the proliferation of oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) proliferation through the production of IL-6 ( A ) The increased expression of IL-17RA was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in a tissue array of human oral squamous cell cancer and adjacent normal tongue tissues (200x magnification). ( B ) IL-17RA expression in OSCC cell lines (SAS, OECM-1 and OC3) was analyzed by qRT-PCR assay (upper panel) and western blot analysis (lower panel). ( C ) OSCC cell lines were then treated with 100 ng/mL rhIL-17 for 48 h and the proliferation rates analyzed by cell counting using trypan blue exclusion. ( D ) The expression levels of Pcna , Ki67, Il-6 , Vegf-a and Mmp2 from IL-17-stimulated OSCC cell lines were measured by qRT-PCR and graphed as relative fold changes from untreated cells. ( E ) The OSCC culture supernatants were analyzed for protein levels of IL-6 after treatment with rhIL-17 for 48 h using ELISA. ( F ) OSCC cells were treated with or without different concentrations of rhIL-6 (0.125-2 ng/mL) for 48 h, and cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. All results represent the mean ± SEM of at last three independent experiments.

    Journal: Oncotarget

    Article Title: Interleukin 17 and peripheral IL-17-expressing T cells are negatively correlated with the overall survival of head and neck cancer patients

    doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.23934

    Figure Lengend Snippet: IL-17 induces the proliferation of oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) proliferation through the production of IL-6 ( A ) The increased expression of IL-17RA was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in a tissue array of human oral squamous cell cancer and adjacent normal tongue tissues (200x magnification). ( B ) IL-17RA expression in OSCC cell lines (SAS, OECM-1 and OC3) was analyzed by qRT-PCR assay (upper panel) and western blot analysis (lower panel). ( C ) OSCC cell lines were then treated with 100 ng/mL rhIL-17 for 48 h and the proliferation rates analyzed by cell counting using trypan blue exclusion. ( D ) The expression levels of Pcna , Ki67, Il-6 , Vegf-a and Mmp2 from IL-17-stimulated OSCC cell lines were measured by qRT-PCR and graphed as relative fold changes from untreated cells. ( E ) The OSCC culture supernatants were analyzed for protein levels of IL-6 after treatment with rhIL-17 for 48 h using ELISA. ( F ) OSCC cells were treated with or without different concentrations of rhIL-6 (0.125-2 ng/mL) for 48 h, and cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. All results represent the mean ± SEM of at last three independent experiments.

    Article Snippet: For the OSCC cells proliferation assay, the OSCC cell lines were seeded in 6-well plates supplemented with recombinant human IL-17 (rhIL-17) or in 96-well plates with recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) or recombinant VEGF-A (Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ, USA) for 24–48 h, and the proliferation rates were analyzed by cell counting using trypan blue or 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.

    Techniques: Expressing, Immunohistochemistry, Quantitative RT-PCR, Western Blot, Cell Counting, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay, MTT Assay

    The high expression of IL-17-producing T cells was positively correlated with VEGF-A production in HNC and to facilitate OSCC cells proliferation ( A ) OSCC cells were cultured in the presence of 100 ng/mL rhIL-17 for 48 h and the VEGF-A content from culture supernatants were analyzed for by ELISA. ( B ) OSCC cells were treated with or without different concentrations of recombinant VEGF-A (0.25-2 ng/mL) for 48 h, and cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. ( C ) Correlations between the level of IL-17-producing T cells (Th17 and Tc17) and plasma VEGF-A in HNC patients ( n = 84) were analyzed by Pearson correlation test. ( D ) The production of VEGF-A in plasma from HNC patients (early and late stage) and healthy donors were analyzed by ELISA. Data are representatives of at least three experiments and shown as the mean ± SEM.

    Journal: Oncotarget

    Article Title: Interleukin 17 and peripheral IL-17-expressing T cells are negatively correlated with the overall survival of head and neck cancer patients

    doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.23934

    Figure Lengend Snippet: The high expression of IL-17-producing T cells was positively correlated with VEGF-A production in HNC and to facilitate OSCC cells proliferation ( A ) OSCC cells were cultured in the presence of 100 ng/mL rhIL-17 for 48 h and the VEGF-A content from culture supernatants were analyzed for by ELISA. ( B ) OSCC cells were treated with or without different concentrations of recombinant VEGF-A (0.25-2 ng/mL) for 48 h, and cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. ( C ) Correlations between the level of IL-17-producing T cells (Th17 and Tc17) and plasma VEGF-A in HNC patients ( n = 84) were analyzed by Pearson correlation test. ( D ) The production of VEGF-A in plasma from HNC patients (early and late stage) and healthy donors were analyzed by ELISA. Data are representatives of at least three experiments and shown as the mean ± SEM.

    Article Snippet: For the OSCC cells proliferation assay, the OSCC cell lines were seeded in 6-well plates supplemented with recombinant human IL-17 (rhIL-17) or in 96-well plates with recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) or recombinant VEGF-A (Peprotech, Rocky Hill, NJ, USA) for 24–48 h, and the proliferation rates were analyzed by cell counting using trypan blue or 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.

    Techniques: Expressing, Cell Culture, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay, Recombinant, MTT Assay

    Effect of MSC‐CM on LEC sprouting. LEC spheroids were embedded in collagen or fibrin gels and treated with VEGF‐C combined with bFGF and 100% MSC‐CM. PMA served as positive control, basal medium supplemented with 0.5% FCS as negative control. (A) Spheroids were grown in hanging drop culture. (B) Representative images of spheroids treated with different stimulations after 24 h. (C) Sprout length and number of spheroids treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis) were quantified and displayed in bar graphs. (n = 2, duplicates, * P ≤ .05 compared to negative control)

    Journal: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine

    Article Title: Mesenchymal stem cells promote lymphangiogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells. Mesenchymal stem cells promote lymphangiogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells

    doi: 10.1111/jcmm.13590

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Effect of MSC‐CM on LEC sprouting. LEC spheroids were embedded in collagen or fibrin gels and treated with VEGF‐C combined with bFGF and 100% MSC‐CM. PMA served as positive control, basal medium supplemented with 0.5% FCS as negative control. (A) Spheroids were grown in hanging drop culture. (B) Representative images of spheroids treated with different stimulations after 24 h. (C) Sprout length and number of spheroids treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis) were quantified and displayed in bar graphs. (n = 2, duplicates, * P ≤ .05 compared to negative control)

    Article Snippet: The lower chambers were filled with 600 μL ECBM supplemented with 0.5% FBS and 400 ng/mL recombinant human VEGF‐C in combination with 200 ng/mL recombinant human bFGF.

    Techniques: Positive Control, Negative Control

    Effect of MSC‐CM on LEC tube formation. LEC were treated with VEGF‐C combined with bFGF, 100% MSC‐CM or co‐cultured with 1,000 or 2,000 MSC. PMA served as positive control, basal medium supplemented with 0.5% FCS as negative control. (n = 3, singles, * P ≤ .05 compared to negative control) (A) Representative images of LEC tube formation. LEC were labelled in red, MSC in green. (B) Bar graphs show the total tube length (left y ‐axis) and the number of tubes (right y ‐axis) of LEC treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis). (C) Bar graphs show the tube‐covered area (left) and the number of branching points (right) of LEC treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis)

    Journal: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine

    Article Title: Mesenchymal stem cells promote lymphangiogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells. Mesenchymal stem cells promote lymphangiogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells

    doi: 10.1111/jcmm.13590

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Effect of MSC‐CM on LEC tube formation. LEC were treated with VEGF‐C combined with bFGF, 100% MSC‐CM or co‐cultured with 1,000 or 2,000 MSC. PMA served as positive control, basal medium supplemented with 0.5% FCS as negative control. (n = 3, singles, * P ≤ .05 compared to negative control) (A) Representative images of LEC tube formation. LEC were labelled in red, MSC in green. (B) Bar graphs show the total tube length (left y ‐axis) and the number of tubes (right y ‐axis) of LEC treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis). (C) Bar graphs show the tube‐covered area (left) and the number of branching points (right) of LEC treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis)

    Article Snippet: The lower chambers were filled with 600 μL ECBM supplemented with 0.5% FBS and 400 ng/mL recombinant human VEGF‐C in combination with 200 ng/mL recombinant human bFGF.

    Techniques: Cell Culture, Positive Control, Negative Control

    Effect of MSC‐CM on LEC transmigration in a modified Boyden chamber assay. The lower compartment of the transwell chamber was loaded with VEGF‐C combined with bFGF, 100% MSC‐CM or 750,000 MSC. PMA served as positive control, basal medium supplemented with 0.5% FCS as negative control. (A) Bar graphs show a comparison of migratory activity represented in the average number of transmigrated LEC per field of vision ( y ‐axis) of cells treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis). (n = 3, duplicates, * P ≤ .05) (B) Representative images of LEC transmigration

    Journal: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine

    Article Title: Mesenchymal stem cells promote lymphangiogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells. Mesenchymal stem cells promote lymphangiogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells

    doi: 10.1111/jcmm.13590

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Effect of MSC‐CM on LEC transmigration in a modified Boyden chamber assay. The lower compartment of the transwell chamber was loaded with VEGF‐C combined with bFGF, 100% MSC‐CM or 750,000 MSC. PMA served as positive control, basal medium supplemented with 0.5% FCS as negative control. (A) Bar graphs show a comparison of migratory activity represented in the average number of transmigrated LEC per field of vision ( y ‐axis) of cells treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis). (n = 3, duplicates, * P ≤ .05) (B) Representative images of LEC transmigration

    Article Snippet: The lower chambers were filled with 600 μL ECBM supplemented with 0.5% FBS and 400 ng/mL recombinant human VEGF‐C in combination with 200 ng/mL recombinant human bFGF.

    Techniques: Transmigration Assay, Modification, Boyden Chamber Assay, Positive Control, Negative Control, Activity Assay

    Effect of MSC‐CM on LEC migration in the scratch assay. LEC were treated with VEGF‐C combined with bFGF and 100% MSC‐CM. PMA served as positive control, basal medium supplemented with 0.5% FCS as negative control. (A) Bar graphs show a comparison of migratory activity represented in uncovered scratch area ( y ‐axis) of LEC treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis) at 12 and 24 h. (n = 3, duplicates, * P ≤ .05; only the significances of 24 h are marked) (B) Representative images of LEC migration

    Journal: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine

    Article Title: Mesenchymal stem cells promote lymphangiogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells. Mesenchymal stem cells promote lymphangiogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells

    doi: 10.1111/jcmm.13590

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Effect of MSC‐CM on LEC migration in the scratch assay. LEC were treated with VEGF‐C combined with bFGF and 100% MSC‐CM. PMA served as positive control, basal medium supplemented with 0.5% FCS as negative control. (A) Bar graphs show a comparison of migratory activity represented in uncovered scratch area ( y ‐axis) of LEC treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis) at 12 and 24 h. (n = 3, duplicates, * P ≤ .05; only the significances of 24 h are marked) (B) Representative images of LEC migration

    Article Snippet: The lower chambers were filled with 600 μL ECBM supplemented with 0.5% FBS and 400 ng/mL recombinant human VEGF‐C in combination with 200 ng/mL recombinant human bFGF.

    Techniques: Migration, Wound Healing Assay, Positive Control, Negative Control, Activity Assay

    Effect of MSC‐conditioned medium (CM) on LEC proliferation in the MTT assay. Bar graphs show a comparison of viability represented in absorbance ( y ‐axis) of LEC treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis) at 24‐72 h. (n = 3, triplicate, * P ≤ .05, ** P ≤ .01; only the significances of 72 h are marked) (A) Cells were treated with different dilutions of MSC‐CM. (B) Cells were treated with 100% MSC‐CM, VEGF‐C, bFGF and the combination of both growth factors. PMA served as positive control, basal medium supplemented with 0.5% FCS as negative control

    Journal: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine

    Article Title: Mesenchymal stem cells promote lymphangiogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells. Mesenchymal stem cells promote lymphangiogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells

    doi: 10.1111/jcmm.13590

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Effect of MSC‐conditioned medium (CM) on LEC proliferation in the MTT assay. Bar graphs show a comparison of viability represented in absorbance ( y ‐axis) of LEC treated with different stimulations ( x ‐axis) at 24‐72 h. (n = 3, triplicate, * P ≤ .05, ** P ≤ .01; only the significances of 72 h are marked) (A) Cells were treated with different dilutions of MSC‐CM. (B) Cells were treated with 100% MSC‐CM, VEGF‐C, bFGF and the combination of both growth factors. PMA served as positive control, basal medium supplemented with 0.5% FCS as negative control

    Article Snippet: The lower chambers were filled with 600 μL ECBM supplemented with 0.5% FBS and 400 ng/mL recombinant human VEGF‐C in combination with 200 ng/mL recombinant human bFGF.

    Techniques: MTT Assay, Positive Control, Negative Control

    Concentration of different growth factors in MSC‐CM. ELISA analyses of MSC‐CM and basal medium as negative control for VEGF‐C, VEGF‐D, HGF and bFGF are displayed in bar graphs. CM was generated with MSC obtained from 3 different donors. (2 replicates, * P ≤ .05 compared to negative control)

    Journal: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine

    Article Title: Mesenchymal stem cells promote lymphangiogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells. Mesenchymal stem cells promote lymphangiogenic properties of lymphatic endothelial cells

    doi: 10.1111/jcmm.13590

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Concentration of different growth factors in MSC‐CM. ELISA analyses of MSC‐CM and basal medium as negative control for VEGF‐C, VEGF‐D, HGF and bFGF are displayed in bar graphs. CM was generated with MSC obtained from 3 different donors. (2 replicates, * P ≤ .05 compared to negative control)

    Article Snippet: The lower chambers were filled with 600 μL ECBM supplemented with 0.5% FBS and 400 ng/mL recombinant human VEGF‐C in combination with 200 ng/mL recombinant human bFGF.

    Techniques: Concentration Assay, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay, Negative Control, Generated