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Equitech-Bio fatty acid free bovine serum albumin bsa
Effect of 24 hour exposure to fatty acids on human BMMSC energy metabolism. A) Palmitate oxidation, B) palmitate uptake, C) glycolysis, and D) glucose oxidation were measured in human <t>BMMSCs</t> that had been treated for 24 hr with either 0.55 mM albumin <t>(BSA</t> group) or 0.55 mM albumin and 0.4 mM palmitate and/or 0.4 mM oleate prior to these metabolism measurements being made. n = 5–8 The graphs indicate which groups were exposed to these different treatments for the 24 hr prior to the metabolism measurements. During each assay all groups were given Krebs buffer supplemented with 5 mM glucose and 0.4 mM palmitate bound to 0.55 mM albumin. In addition, the Krebs buffer was supplemented with either [U- 14 C]glucose, [1– 14 C]palmitate, or [5– 3 H]glucose for the measurement of glucose oxidation, palmitate oxidation and uptake, or glycolysis, respectively. E) The contribution of metabolic pathways to ATP production were calculated from the metabolic rate results. * Significantly different from all groups. Values are shown as mean ± SEM.
Fatty Acid Free Bovine Serum Albumin Bsa, supplied by Equitech-Bio, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 93/100, based on 16 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
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93/100 stars

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1) Product Images from "Effect of Fatty Acids on Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Energy Metabolism and Survival"

Article Title: Effect of Fatty Acids on Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Energy Metabolism and Survival

Journal: PLoS ONE

doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0120257

Effect of 24 hour exposure to fatty acids on human BMMSC energy metabolism. A) Palmitate oxidation, B) palmitate uptake, C) glycolysis, and D) glucose oxidation were measured in human BMMSCs that had been treated for 24 hr with either 0.55 mM albumin (BSA group) or 0.55 mM albumin and 0.4 mM palmitate and/or 0.4 mM oleate prior to these metabolism measurements being made. n = 5–8 The graphs indicate which groups were exposed to these different treatments for the 24 hr prior to the metabolism measurements. During each assay all groups were given Krebs buffer supplemented with 5 mM glucose and 0.4 mM palmitate bound to 0.55 mM albumin. In addition, the Krebs buffer was supplemented with either [U- 14 C]glucose, [1– 14 C]palmitate, or [5– 3 H]glucose for the measurement of glucose oxidation, palmitate oxidation and uptake, or glycolysis, respectively. E) The contribution of metabolic pathways to ATP production were calculated from the metabolic rate results. * Significantly different from all groups. Values are shown as mean ± SEM.
Figure Legend Snippet: Effect of 24 hour exposure to fatty acids on human BMMSC energy metabolism. A) Palmitate oxidation, B) palmitate uptake, C) glycolysis, and D) glucose oxidation were measured in human BMMSCs that had been treated for 24 hr with either 0.55 mM albumin (BSA group) or 0.55 mM albumin and 0.4 mM palmitate and/or 0.4 mM oleate prior to these metabolism measurements being made. n = 5–8 The graphs indicate which groups were exposed to these different treatments for the 24 hr prior to the metabolism measurements. During each assay all groups were given Krebs buffer supplemented with 5 mM glucose and 0.4 mM palmitate bound to 0.55 mM albumin. In addition, the Krebs buffer was supplemented with either [U- 14 C]glucose, [1– 14 C]palmitate, or [5– 3 H]glucose for the measurement of glucose oxidation, palmitate oxidation and uptake, or glycolysis, respectively. E) The contribution of metabolic pathways to ATP production were calculated from the metabolic rate results. * Significantly different from all groups. Values are shown as mean ± SEM.

Techniques Used:

Effect of acute exposure to fatty acids on human BMMSC energy metabolism. A) Glycolysis, B) glucose oxidation, C) palmitate oxidation, D) palmitate uptake, E) oleate oxidation, and F) oleate uptake were measured in untreated human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs). n = 5–7 During each assay Krebs Henseleit buffer was supplemented with 5 mM glucose and, as indicated in each graph, either 0.55 mM albumin (BSA group) or 0.55 mM albumin bound to 0.4 mM palmitate and/or 0.4 mM oleate. In addition, the Krebs Henseleit buffer was supplemented with either [U- 14 C]glucose, [1– 14 C]palmitate, [1– 14 C]oleate, or [5– 3 H]glucose for the measurement of glucose oxidation, palmitate oxidation and uptake, oleate oxidation and uptake, or glycolysis, respectively. Since these experiments assessed the acute effect of palmitate and oleate, BMMSCs were maintained in cell culture media used to culture these immediately up to the start of each assay when the media was switched to Krebs Henseleit buffer supplemented with fatty acids. The levels and type of fatty acid BMMSCs were exposed to is indicated on the x-axis of the figures. * Significantly different from all groups. Values are shown as the mean ± SEM.
Figure Legend Snippet: Effect of acute exposure to fatty acids on human BMMSC energy metabolism. A) Glycolysis, B) glucose oxidation, C) palmitate oxidation, D) palmitate uptake, E) oleate oxidation, and F) oleate uptake were measured in untreated human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs). n = 5–7 During each assay Krebs Henseleit buffer was supplemented with 5 mM glucose and, as indicated in each graph, either 0.55 mM albumin (BSA group) or 0.55 mM albumin bound to 0.4 mM palmitate and/or 0.4 mM oleate. In addition, the Krebs Henseleit buffer was supplemented with either [U- 14 C]glucose, [1– 14 C]palmitate, [1– 14 C]oleate, or [5– 3 H]glucose for the measurement of glucose oxidation, palmitate oxidation and uptake, oleate oxidation and uptake, or glycolysis, respectively. Since these experiments assessed the acute effect of palmitate and oleate, BMMSCs were maintained in cell culture media used to culture these immediately up to the start of each assay when the media was switched to Krebs Henseleit buffer supplemented with fatty acids. The levels and type of fatty acid BMMSCs were exposed to is indicated on the x-axis of the figures. * Significantly different from all groups. Values are shown as the mean ± SEM.

Techniques Used: Cell Culture

Effect of 24 hr exposure to palmitate and oleate on human BMMSC mitochondrial membrane potential. A) Images of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) stained bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) treated for 24 hr with indicated treatments. B) Relative TMRM levels. BMMSCs were treated for 24 hr with 0.55 mM bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone or palmitate and/or oleate bound to 0.55 mM albumin. TMRM and Hoechst stain were added to the medium to measure mitochondrial membrane potential and stain nuclei, respectively, and images were taken. All fatty acid treated groups were also treated with media supplemented with 0.55 mM albumin in addition to the type and amount of fatty acid indicated in the figures. 4 separate observations. Values are shown as the mean ± SEM. * Significantly different from the BSA group.
Figure Legend Snippet: Effect of 24 hr exposure to palmitate and oleate on human BMMSC mitochondrial membrane potential. A) Images of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) stained bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) treated for 24 hr with indicated treatments. B) Relative TMRM levels. BMMSCs were treated for 24 hr with 0.55 mM bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone or palmitate and/or oleate bound to 0.55 mM albumin. TMRM and Hoechst stain were added to the medium to measure mitochondrial membrane potential and stain nuclei, respectively, and images were taken. All fatty acid treated groups were also treated with media supplemented with 0.55 mM albumin in addition to the type and amount of fatty acid indicated in the figures. 4 separate observations. Values are shown as the mean ± SEM. * Significantly different from the BSA group.

Techniques Used: Staining

Related Articles

Concentration Assay:

Article Title: Effect of Fatty Acids on Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Energy Metabolism and Survival
Article Snippet: .. During experiments assessing the chronic effect of fatty acids on BMMSCs this media was also supplemented with 4% fatty acid free bovine serum albumin (BSA) (Equitech-Bio Inc BAH66) or 4% BSA bound to the indicated type and concentration of fatty acid (Palmitate, Sigma P9767; Oleate, Fluka Analytical 60420; Stearate, Sigma S3381). ..

other:

Article Title: Lipopolysaccharides Impair Insulin Gene Expression in Isolated Islets of Langerhans via Toll-Like Receptor-4 and NF-κB Signalling
Article Snippet: Fatty acid–free bovine serum albumin (BSA) was from Equitech-Bio (Kerrville, TX, USA).

Article Title: Reduced lipolysis response to adipose afferent reflex involved in impaired activation of adrenoceptor-cAMP-PKA-hormone sensitive lipase pathway in obesity
Article Snippet: Fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin (BSA) was purchased from equitech-bio, Inc. (Kerrville, TX, USA).

Article Title: Deletion of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) Protects Pancreatic Beta-Cells from Stress-Induced Death but Not from Glucose Homeostasis Alterations under Pro-Inflammatory Conditions
Article Snippet: Fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin (BSA) was from Equitech-Bio (Kerrville, TX, USA).

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    Equitech-Bio fatty acid free bovine serum albumin bsa
    Effect of 24 hour exposure to fatty acids on human BMMSC energy metabolism. A) Palmitate oxidation, B) palmitate uptake, C) glycolysis, and D) glucose oxidation were measured in human <t>BMMSCs</t> that had been treated for 24 hr with either 0.55 mM albumin <t>(BSA</t> group) or 0.55 mM albumin and 0.4 mM palmitate and/or 0.4 mM oleate prior to these metabolism measurements being made. n = 5–8 The graphs indicate which groups were exposed to these different treatments for the 24 hr prior to the metabolism measurements. During each assay all groups were given Krebs buffer supplemented with 5 mM glucose and 0.4 mM palmitate bound to 0.55 mM albumin. In addition, the Krebs buffer was supplemented with either [U- 14 C]glucose, [1– 14 C]palmitate, or [5– 3 H]glucose for the measurement of glucose oxidation, palmitate oxidation and uptake, or glycolysis, respectively. E) The contribution of metabolic pathways to ATP production were calculated from the metabolic rate results. * Significantly different from all groups. Values are shown as mean ± SEM.
    Fatty Acid Free Bovine Serum Albumin Bsa, supplied by Equitech-Bio, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 93/100, based on 16 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/fatty acid free bovine serum albumin bsa/product/Equitech-Bio
    Average 93 stars, based on 16 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    fatty acid free bovine serum albumin bsa - by Bioz Stars, 2020-09
    93/100 stars
      Buy from Supplier

    93
    Equitech-Bio fatty acid free bsa
    Effect of diabetes on cholesterol efflux to <t>apoA1</t> or HDL and regulation of cholesterol transporters by Ager in primary murine BMDMs. Primary BMDMs were retrieved from nondiabetic and diabetic WT (2 months of hyperglycemia) and Ager −/− mice and were cultured in concentrations of glucose consistent with the glycemic state of the mice from which they were retrieved. BMDMs were labeled with 3 H-cholesterol and treated with acetylated LDL and fatty acid–free <t>BSA</t> (1%) for 24 h. A and B : To mediate cholesterol efflux, cells were treated with apoA1 (5 μg/mL) ( A ) or HDL (100 μg/mL) ( B ) for 6 h, and supernatant was collected. Percent cholesterol efflux is the radioactivity in the supernatant divided by the sum of the radioactivity measured in the supernatant and the cell lysates from n ≥ 5 mice/group. C and D : BMDMs were retrieved from WT or Ager −/− mice and subjected to quantitative real-time PCR for detection of Abca1 mRNA transcript ( C ) and ABCA1 protein ( D ) analysis ( n = 3 mice/group). E and F : BMDMs were prepared as in C and D and assessed for levels of Abcg1 mRNA transcripts ( E ) and ABCG1 protein ( F ) ( n = 3 mice/group). Error bars represent mean ± SEM. hr, hour; NS, not statistically significant.
    Fatty Acid Free Bsa, supplied by Equitech-Bio, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 93/100, based on 20 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/fatty acid free bsa/product/Equitech-Bio
    Average 93 stars, based on 20 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    fatty acid free bsa - by Bioz Stars, 2020-09
    93/100 stars
      Buy from Supplier

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    Effect of 24 hour exposure to fatty acids on human BMMSC energy metabolism. A) Palmitate oxidation, B) palmitate uptake, C) glycolysis, and D) glucose oxidation were measured in human BMMSCs that had been treated for 24 hr with either 0.55 mM albumin (BSA group) or 0.55 mM albumin and 0.4 mM palmitate and/or 0.4 mM oleate prior to these metabolism measurements being made. n = 5–8 The graphs indicate which groups were exposed to these different treatments for the 24 hr prior to the metabolism measurements. During each assay all groups were given Krebs buffer supplemented with 5 mM glucose and 0.4 mM palmitate bound to 0.55 mM albumin. In addition, the Krebs buffer was supplemented with either [U- 14 C]glucose, [1– 14 C]palmitate, or [5– 3 H]glucose for the measurement of glucose oxidation, palmitate oxidation and uptake, or glycolysis, respectively. E) The contribution of metabolic pathways to ATP production were calculated from the metabolic rate results. * Significantly different from all groups. Values are shown as mean ± SEM.

    Journal: PLoS ONE

    Article Title: Effect of Fatty Acids on Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Energy Metabolism and Survival

    doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0120257

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Effect of 24 hour exposure to fatty acids on human BMMSC energy metabolism. A) Palmitate oxidation, B) palmitate uptake, C) glycolysis, and D) glucose oxidation were measured in human BMMSCs that had been treated for 24 hr with either 0.55 mM albumin (BSA group) or 0.55 mM albumin and 0.4 mM palmitate and/or 0.4 mM oleate prior to these metabolism measurements being made. n = 5–8 The graphs indicate which groups were exposed to these different treatments for the 24 hr prior to the metabolism measurements. During each assay all groups were given Krebs buffer supplemented with 5 mM glucose and 0.4 mM palmitate bound to 0.55 mM albumin. In addition, the Krebs buffer was supplemented with either [U- 14 C]glucose, [1– 14 C]palmitate, or [5– 3 H]glucose for the measurement of glucose oxidation, palmitate oxidation and uptake, or glycolysis, respectively. E) The contribution of metabolic pathways to ATP production were calculated from the metabolic rate results. * Significantly different from all groups. Values are shown as mean ± SEM.

    Article Snippet: During experiments assessing the chronic effect of fatty acids on BMMSCs this media was also supplemented with 4% fatty acid free bovine serum albumin (BSA) (Equitech-Bio Inc BAH66) or 4% BSA bound to the indicated type and concentration of fatty acid (Palmitate, Sigma P9767; Oleate, Fluka Analytical 60420; Stearate, Sigma S3381).

    Techniques:

    Effect of acute exposure to fatty acids on human BMMSC energy metabolism. A) Glycolysis, B) glucose oxidation, C) palmitate oxidation, D) palmitate uptake, E) oleate oxidation, and F) oleate uptake were measured in untreated human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs). n = 5–7 During each assay Krebs Henseleit buffer was supplemented with 5 mM glucose and, as indicated in each graph, either 0.55 mM albumin (BSA group) or 0.55 mM albumin bound to 0.4 mM palmitate and/or 0.4 mM oleate. In addition, the Krebs Henseleit buffer was supplemented with either [U- 14 C]glucose, [1– 14 C]palmitate, [1– 14 C]oleate, or [5– 3 H]glucose for the measurement of glucose oxidation, palmitate oxidation and uptake, oleate oxidation and uptake, or glycolysis, respectively. Since these experiments assessed the acute effect of palmitate and oleate, BMMSCs were maintained in cell culture media used to culture these immediately up to the start of each assay when the media was switched to Krebs Henseleit buffer supplemented with fatty acids. The levels and type of fatty acid BMMSCs were exposed to is indicated on the x-axis of the figures. * Significantly different from all groups. Values are shown as the mean ± SEM.

    Journal: PLoS ONE

    Article Title: Effect of Fatty Acids on Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Energy Metabolism and Survival

    doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0120257

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Effect of acute exposure to fatty acids on human BMMSC energy metabolism. A) Glycolysis, B) glucose oxidation, C) palmitate oxidation, D) palmitate uptake, E) oleate oxidation, and F) oleate uptake were measured in untreated human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs). n = 5–7 During each assay Krebs Henseleit buffer was supplemented with 5 mM glucose and, as indicated in each graph, either 0.55 mM albumin (BSA group) or 0.55 mM albumin bound to 0.4 mM palmitate and/or 0.4 mM oleate. In addition, the Krebs Henseleit buffer was supplemented with either [U- 14 C]glucose, [1– 14 C]palmitate, [1– 14 C]oleate, or [5– 3 H]glucose for the measurement of glucose oxidation, palmitate oxidation and uptake, oleate oxidation and uptake, or glycolysis, respectively. Since these experiments assessed the acute effect of palmitate and oleate, BMMSCs were maintained in cell culture media used to culture these immediately up to the start of each assay when the media was switched to Krebs Henseleit buffer supplemented with fatty acids. The levels and type of fatty acid BMMSCs were exposed to is indicated on the x-axis of the figures. * Significantly different from all groups. Values are shown as the mean ± SEM.

    Article Snippet: During experiments assessing the chronic effect of fatty acids on BMMSCs this media was also supplemented with 4% fatty acid free bovine serum albumin (BSA) (Equitech-Bio Inc BAH66) or 4% BSA bound to the indicated type and concentration of fatty acid (Palmitate, Sigma P9767; Oleate, Fluka Analytical 60420; Stearate, Sigma S3381).

    Techniques: Cell Culture

    Effect of 24 hr exposure to palmitate and oleate on human BMMSC mitochondrial membrane potential. A) Images of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) stained bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) treated for 24 hr with indicated treatments. B) Relative TMRM levels. BMMSCs were treated for 24 hr with 0.55 mM bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone or palmitate and/or oleate bound to 0.55 mM albumin. TMRM and Hoechst stain were added to the medium to measure mitochondrial membrane potential and stain nuclei, respectively, and images were taken. All fatty acid treated groups were also treated with media supplemented with 0.55 mM albumin in addition to the type and amount of fatty acid indicated in the figures. 4 separate observations. Values are shown as the mean ± SEM. * Significantly different from the BSA group.

    Journal: PLoS ONE

    Article Title: Effect of Fatty Acids on Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Energy Metabolism and Survival

    doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0120257

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Effect of 24 hr exposure to palmitate and oleate on human BMMSC mitochondrial membrane potential. A) Images of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) stained bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) treated for 24 hr with indicated treatments. B) Relative TMRM levels. BMMSCs were treated for 24 hr with 0.55 mM bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone or palmitate and/or oleate bound to 0.55 mM albumin. TMRM and Hoechst stain were added to the medium to measure mitochondrial membrane potential and stain nuclei, respectively, and images were taken. All fatty acid treated groups were also treated with media supplemented with 0.55 mM albumin in addition to the type and amount of fatty acid indicated in the figures. 4 separate observations. Values are shown as the mean ± SEM. * Significantly different from the BSA group.

    Article Snippet: During experiments assessing the chronic effect of fatty acids on BMMSCs this media was also supplemented with 4% fatty acid free bovine serum albumin (BSA) (Equitech-Bio Inc BAH66) or 4% BSA bound to the indicated type and concentration of fatty acid (Palmitate, Sigma P9767; Oleate, Fluka Analytical 60420; Stearate, Sigma S3381).

    Techniques: Staining

    Effect of diabetes on cholesterol efflux to apoA1 or HDL and regulation of cholesterol transporters by Ager in primary murine BMDMs. Primary BMDMs were retrieved from nondiabetic and diabetic WT (2 months of hyperglycemia) and Ager −/− mice and were cultured in concentrations of glucose consistent with the glycemic state of the mice from which they were retrieved. BMDMs were labeled with 3 H-cholesterol and treated with acetylated LDL and fatty acid–free BSA (1%) for 24 h. A and B : To mediate cholesterol efflux, cells were treated with apoA1 (5 μg/mL) ( A ) or HDL (100 μg/mL) ( B ) for 6 h, and supernatant was collected. Percent cholesterol efflux is the radioactivity in the supernatant divided by the sum of the radioactivity measured in the supernatant and the cell lysates from n ≥ 5 mice/group. C and D : BMDMs were retrieved from WT or Ager −/− mice and subjected to quantitative real-time PCR for detection of Abca1 mRNA transcript ( C ) and ABCA1 protein ( D ) analysis ( n = 3 mice/group). E and F : BMDMs were prepared as in C and D and assessed for levels of Abcg1 mRNA transcripts ( E ) and ABCG1 protein ( F ) ( n = 3 mice/group). Error bars represent mean ± SEM. hr, hour; NS, not statistically significant.

    Journal: Diabetes

    Article Title: RAGE Suppresses ABCG1-Mediated Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux in Diabetes

    doi: 10.2337/db15-0575

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Effect of diabetes on cholesterol efflux to apoA1 or HDL and regulation of cholesterol transporters by Ager in primary murine BMDMs. Primary BMDMs were retrieved from nondiabetic and diabetic WT (2 months of hyperglycemia) and Ager −/− mice and were cultured in concentrations of glucose consistent with the glycemic state of the mice from which they were retrieved. BMDMs were labeled with 3 H-cholesterol and treated with acetylated LDL and fatty acid–free BSA (1%) for 24 h. A and B : To mediate cholesterol efflux, cells were treated with apoA1 (5 μg/mL) ( A ) or HDL (100 μg/mL) ( B ) for 6 h, and supernatant was collected. Percent cholesterol efflux is the radioactivity in the supernatant divided by the sum of the radioactivity measured in the supernatant and the cell lysates from n ≥ 5 mice/group. C and D : BMDMs were retrieved from WT or Ager −/− mice and subjected to quantitative real-time PCR for detection of Abca1 mRNA transcript ( C ) and ABCA1 protein ( D ) analysis ( n = 3 mice/group). E and F : BMDMs were prepared as in C and D and assessed for levels of Abcg1 mRNA transcripts ( E ) and ABCG1 protein ( F ) ( n = 3 mice/group). Error bars represent mean ± SEM. hr, hour; NS, not statistically significant.

    Article Snippet: Reagents The following materials were purchased: apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), HDL, and acetylated LDL (Biomedical Technologies, Inc.); fatty acid–free BSA (Equitech-Bio); T 0901317 (Tocris Bioscience); human plasma LDL (Sigma-Aldrich); assays for measurements of HDL, total cholesterol, and triglycerides (Wako Diagnostics); rosiglitazone (Sigma-Aldrich); and U0126 and PD98509 (Cell Signaling).

    Techniques: Mouse Assay, Cell Culture, Labeling, Radioactivity, Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction