escherichia coli  (ATCC)


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    Name:
    Escherichia coli Crooks
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    Catalog Number:
    8739-mini-pack
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    ATCC® 8739-MINI-PACK™ consists of 6 ready-to-use vials of ATCC® 8739™ frozen in 200 µL of glycerol stock, eliminating the need to rehydrate and culture the strain prior to use. Each vial is provided with a 2-D barcode for easy storage and tracking, as well as peel-off labels for fast and reliable recordkeeping.  Learn more about ATCC® MinisDeveloped by the leaders in microbial cultivation and preservation, ATCC® Minis provide a convenient, ready-to-use solution for handling quality control strains. ATCC® Minis are authenticated and backed by ATCC polyphasic testing – ensuring the same consistent and reliable reference materials you’ve come to trust for ATCC Genuine Cultures®. It is easy to ensure the quality of your products with ATCC® Minis – just open, plate, and go! . Assay of antimicrobial preservatives Bioresistance testing Efficacy testing Media testing Preparatory test control Quality control strain Testing antimicrobial handwashing formulations Reduces dehydroascorbic acid Food testing Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Quality control strain for Biosynth and Difco products
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    Structured Review

    ATCC escherichia coli
    Inhibition zone diameter of TMP-A on the growth of the eleven microorganisms 1: Staphylococcus albus, 2: Brevibacillus laterosporus, 3: <t>Escherichia</t> coli, 4: Bacillus subtilis, 5: Micrococcus lysodeikticus, 6: Salmonellasp, 7: Gibberella fujikuroi, 8: Fusarium graminearum

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    Images

    1) Product Images from "Anti-microorganism, anti-tumor, and immune activities of a novel polysaccharide isolated from Tricholoma matsutake"

    Article Title: Anti-microorganism, anti-tumor, and immune activities of a novel polysaccharide isolated from Tricholoma matsutake

    Journal: Pharmacognosy Magazine

    doi: 10.4103/0973-1296.113278

    Inhibition zone diameter of TMP-A on the growth of the eleven microorganisms 1: Staphylococcus albus, 2: Brevibacillus laterosporus, 3: Escherichia coli, 4: Bacillus subtilis, 5: Micrococcus lysodeikticus, 6: Salmonellasp, 7: Gibberella fujikuroi, 8: Fusarium graminearum
    Figure Legend Snippet: Inhibition zone diameter of TMP-A on the growth of the eleven microorganisms 1: Staphylococcus albus, 2: Brevibacillus laterosporus, 3: Escherichia coli, 4: Bacillus subtilis, 5: Micrococcus lysodeikticus, 6: Salmonellasp, 7: Gibberella fujikuroi, 8: Fusarium graminearum

    Techniques Used: Inhibition

    2) Product Images from "Silver-coated gold nanorods as a promising antimicrobial agent in the treatment of cancer-related infections"

    Article Title: Silver-coated gold nanorods as a promising antimicrobial agent in the treatment of cancer-related infections

    Journal: International Journal of Nanomedicine

    doi: 10.2147/IJN.S169489

    Bacteria growth curves for Gram-negative bacteria strains: ( A ) Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ( B ) Escherichia coli and Gram-positive bacteria strains, ( C ) Staphylococcus aureus , and ( D ) Staphylococcus epidermidis under different concentrations of Ag/AuNRs.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Bacteria growth curves for Gram-negative bacteria strains: ( A ) Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ( B ) Escherichia coli and Gram-positive bacteria strains, ( C ) Staphylococcus aureus , and ( D ) Staphylococcus epidermidis under different concentrations of Ag/AuNRs.

    Techniques Used:

    3) Product Images from "Green Tea Seed Isolated Saponins Exerts Antibacterial Effects against Various Strains of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria, a Comprehensive Study In Vitro and In Vivo"

    Article Title: Green Tea Seed Isolated Saponins Exerts Antibacterial Effects against Various Strains of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria, a Comprehensive Study In Vitro and In Vivo

    Journal: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : eCAM

    doi: 10.1155/2018/3486106

    Antibacterial activities of Fr2 of green tea seed saponins against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella gallinarum, Salmonella choleraesuis, Salmonella pullorum, Salmonella dublin, and Staphylococcus aureus . The antibacterial activities were determined by allowing the bacteria to grow in the presence of various concentrations of saponins using 96-well microtiter plate and then checking the viability of bacteria by measuring OD 660 with spectrophotometer. Data are expressed as means of experiments in triplicate ± SEM. Data are statistically significant at P
    Figure Legend Snippet: Antibacterial activities of Fr2 of green tea seed saponins against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella gallinarum, Salmonella choleraesuis, Salmonella pullorum, Salmonella dublin, and Staphylococcus aureus . The antibacterial activities were determined by allowing the bacteria to grow in the presence of various concentrations of saponins using 96-well microtiter plate and then checking the viability of bacteria by measuring OD 660 with spectrophotometer. Data are expressed as means of experiments in triplicate ± SEM. Data are statistically significant at P

    Techniques Used: Spectrophotometry

    Antibacterial activities of Fr1 of green tea seed saponins against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella gallinarum, Salmonella choleraesuis, Salmonella pullorum, Salmonella dublin, and Staphylococcus aureus . The antibacterial activities were determined by allowing the bacteria to grow in the presence of various concentrations of saponins using 96-well microtiter plate and then checking the viability of bacteria by measuring OD 660 with spectrophotometer. Data are expressed as means of experiments in triplicate ± SEM. Data are statistically significant at P
    Figure Legend Snippet: Antibacterial activities of Fr1 of green tea seed saponins against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella gallinarum, Salmonella choleraesuis, Salmonella pullorum, Salmonella dublin, and Staphylococcus aureus . The antibacterial activities were determined by allowing the bacteria to grow in the presence of various concentrations of saponins using 96-well microtiter plate and then checking the viability of bacteria by measuring OD 660 with spectrophotometer. Data are expressed as means of experiments in triplicate ± SEM. Data are statistically significant at P

    Techniques Used: Spectrophotometry

    4) Product Images from "NaCl: for the safer in vivo use of antibacterial silver based nanoparticles"

    Article Title: NaCl: for the safer in vivo use of antibacterial silver based nanoparticles

    Journal: International Journal of Nanomedicine

    doi: 10.2147/IJN.S153168

    Plate counting photographs of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus co-cultured with Ag-C and Ag or with 10× NaCl in vitro for 3 h ( A – J ). Notes: The corresponding inhibition rates of bacteria ( K ). ** p
    Figure Legend Snippet: Plate counting photographs of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus co-cultured with Ag-C and Ag or with 10× NaCl in vitro for 3 h ( A – J ). Notes: The corresponding inhibition rates of bacteria ( K ). ** p

    Techniques Used: Cell Culture, In Vitro, Inhibition

    5) Product Images from "Expression of a recombinant hybrid antimicrobial peptide magainin II-cecropin B in the mycelium of the medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris and its validation in mice"

    Article Title: Expression of a recombinant hybrid antimicrobial peptide magainin II-cecropin B in the mycelium of the medicinal fungus Cordyceps militaris and its validation in mice

    Journal: Microbial Cell Factories

    doi: 10.1186/s12934-018-0865-3

    The effects of Mag II-CB and CB treatment in the mice, as determined by intestinal histology. Representative images for the different groups are shown at ×40 magnification. a Normal control (NC); b recombinant Mag II-CB (MC); c recombinant CB (CB); d Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) (EI); e E. coli -infected mice treated with Mag II-CB (MC + EI); f E. coli -infected mice treated with CB (CB + EI)
    Figure Legend Snippet: The effects of Mag II-CB and CB treatment in the mice, as determined by intestinal histology. Representative images for the different groups are shown at ×40 magnification. a Normal control (NC); b recombinant Mag II-CB (MC); c recombinant CB (CB); d Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) (EI); e E. coli -infected mice treated with Mag II-CB (MC + EI); f E. coli -infected mice treated with CB (CB + EI)

    Techniques Used: Mouse Assay, Recombinant, Infection

    6) Product Images from "Chinese Herbal Formula Feilin Vaginal Gel Prevents the Cervicitis in Mouse Model"

    Article Title: Chinese Herbal Formula Feilin Vaginal Gel Prevents the Cervicitis in Mouse Model

    Journal: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : eCAM

    doi: 10.1155/2019/4168126

    The FVG reduce the pathological injury of cervix induced by Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus . (a) Control group, (b) model group, (c) PS group, (d) FVG (2.2 g/kg) group, (e) FVG (1.1 g/kg) group, (f) FVG (0.55 g/kg) group, and (g) statistical analysis of histological examination. n =20, statistically significant ## p
    Figure Legend Snippet: The FVG reduce the pathological injury of cervix induced by Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus . (a) Control group, (b) model group, (c) PS group, (d) FVG (2.2 g/kg) group, (e) FVG (1.1 g/kg) group, (f) FVG (0.55 g/kg) group, and (g) statistical analysis of histological examination. n =20, statistically significant ## p

    Techniques Used:

    7) Product Images from "Antibacterial effects of Apis mellifera and stingless bees honeys on susceptible and resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia"

    Article Title: Antibacterial effects of Apis mellifera and stingless bees honeys on susceptible and resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia

    Journal: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    doi: 10.1186/1472-6882-13-269

    Bacteria inhibitions of 50% solution (v/v) of stingless bees honey, Apis mellifera white and yellow honeys on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Klebsiella pneumoniae (R), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) and Escherichia coli (R).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Bacteria inhibitions of 50% solution (v/v) of stingless bees honey, Apis mellifera white and yellow honeys on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Klebsiella pneumoniae (R), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) and Escherichia coli (R).

    Techniques Used:

    8) Product Images from "Antibacterial effects of Apis mellifera and stingless bees honeys on susceptible and resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia"

    Article Title: Antibacterial effects of Apis mellifera and stingless bees honeys on susceptible and resistant strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia

    Journal: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    doi: 10.1186/1472-6882-13-269

    Bacteria inhibitions of 50% solution (v/v) of stingless bees honey, Apis mellifera white and yellow honeys on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Klebsiella pneumoniae (R), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) and Escherichia coli (R).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Bacteria inhibitions of 50% solution (v/v) of stingless bees honey, Apis mellifera white and yellow honeys on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Klebsiella pneumoniae (R), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) and Escherichia coli (R).

    Techniques Used:

    9) Product Images from "Comparative analysis of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli microcalorimetric growth"

    Article Title: Comparative analysis of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli microcalorimetric growth

    Journal: BMC Microbiology

    doi: 10.1186/1471-2180-13-171

    Physiological saline (PS) dilution effect on Peakfit decomposition of Escherichia coli normalized heat flow (NHF) thermograms. a . Two peak decomposition (HVL) of a normal 0.5 ml Escherichia coli thermogram (0 ml PS added, ~0.5 ml air volume). b . Two peak decomposition (HVL) of 0.5 ml Escherichia coli + 0.4 ml PS (~0.1 ml air volume).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Physiological saline (PS) dilution effect on Peakfit decomposition of Escherichia coli normalized heat flow (NHF) thermograms. a . Two peak decomposition (HVL) of a normal 0.5 ml Escherichia coli thermogram (0 ml PS added, ~0.5 ml air volume). b . Two peak decomposition (HVL) of 0.5 ml Escherichia coli + 0.4 ml PS (~0.1 ml air volume).

    Techniques Used: Flow Cytometry

    Variation of the absolute (J) and specific (J/ml suspension) thermal effects with available air volume (ml). a . Total and peak values for Escherichia coli average thermograms. b . Total and peak values for Staphylococcus aureus average thermograms. c . Physiological saline dilution values for Escherichia coli thermograms. Specific heats are fitted with exponential trendlines, while absolute heats are fitted with linear ones. “hvl-peak1” and “hvl-peak2” represent the contributions of the two Peakfit components to the overall thermal effect.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Variation of the absolute (J) and specific (J/ml suspension) thermal effects with available air volume (ml). a . Total and peak values for Escherichia coli average thermograms. b . Total and peak values for Staphylococcus aureus average thermograms. c . Physiological saline dilution values for Escherichia coli thermograms. Specific heats are fitted with exponential trendlines, while absolute heats are fitted with linear ones. “hvl-peak1” and “hvl-peak2” represent the contributions of the two Peakfit components to the overall thermal effect.

    Techniques Used:

    Specific total thermal growth ΔH (J/ml) variation with the air volume content of the cell, calculated as (1 - V sample ) ml. The exponentially fitted graphs of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus are quite similar, despite the marked differences in their respective thermograms.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Specific total thermal growth ΔH (J/ml) variation with the air volume content of the cell, calculated as (1 - V sample ) ml. The exponentially fitted graphs of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus are quite similar, despite the marked differences in their respective thermograms.

    Techniques Used:

    Peakfit decomposition of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus normalized heat flow (NHF) average thermograms. Two peak decomposition of average thermograms of 0.5 ml volume samples using the built-in Haarhof – Van der Linde (HVL) chromatography function. The two peaks may represent bacterial growth on behalf of dissolved (first peak) and diffused (second peak) oxygen. a . Fronted-fronted coupling for the E. coli thermogram decomposition. b . Tailed-fronted coupling for the S. aureus thermogram decomposition.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Peakfit decomposition of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus normalized heat flow (NHF) average thermograms. Two peak decomposition of average thermograms of 0.5 ml volume samples using the built-in Haarhof – Van der Linde (HVL) chromatography function. The two peaks may represent bacterial growth on behalf of dissolved (first peak) and diffused (second peak) oxygen. a . Fronted-fronted coupling for the E. coli thermogram decomposition. b . Tailed-fronted coupling for the S. aureus thermogram decomposition.

    Techniques Used: Flow Cytometry, Chromatography

    Peakfit decomposition of Escherichia coli normalized heat flow (NHF) thermograms with oxygen diffusion suppression by mineral oil (MO). a . Two peak decomposition of 0.5 ml Escherichia coli + 0.4 ml MO thermogram (~0.1 ml air volume). b . Three peak decomposition of 0.5 ml Escherichia coli thermogram + 0.1 ml MO (~0.4 ml air volume).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Peakfit decomposition of Escherichia coli normalized heat flow (NHF) thermograms with oxygen diffusion suppression by mineral oil (MO). a . Two peak decomposition of 0.5 ml Escherichia coli + 0.4 ml MO thermogram (~0.1 ml air volume). b . Three peak decomposition of 0.5 ml Escherichia coli thermogram + 0.1 ml MO (~0.4 ml air volume).

    Techniques Used: Flow Cytometry, Diffusion-based Assay

    Mean thermograms of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus for samples with different volumes. a . Mean thermograms of Escherichia coli (n = 18) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 8) at various volumes of bacterial suspension. The mean thermograms were obtained averaging the same volume sample runs. Both species exhibit a double-peak behavior but with sizable shape differences. EC - Escherichia coli , SA - Staphylococcus aureus . b . Mean volume-normalized thermograms (expressed as mW/ml bacterial suspension) of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus generated using the Calisto software (HF/V: heat flow/sample volume). The legends display sample volume in microliters.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Mean thermograms of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus for samples with different volumes. a . Mean thermograms of Escherichia coli (n = 18) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 8) at various volumes of bacterial suspension. The mean thermograms were obtained averaging the same volume sample runs. Both species exhibit a double-peak behavior but with sizable shape differences. EC - Escherichia coli , SA - Staphylococcus aureus . b . Mean volume-normalized thermograms (expressed as mW/ml bacterial suspension) of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus generated using the Calisto software (HF/V: heat flow/sample volume). The legends display sample volume in microliters.

    Techniques Used: Generated, Software, Flow Cytometry

    10) Product Images from "FLOQSwab™: Optimisation of Procedures for the Recovery of Microbiological Samples from Surfaces"

    Article Title: FLOQSwab™: Optimisation of Procedures for the Recovery of Microbiological Samples from Surfaces

    Journal: Italian Journal of Food Safety

    doi: 10.4081/ijfs.2016.5756

    Experiment 2: Escherichia coli counts observed on polypropylene surface. Values are expressed as percentage of means of replicates, compared to expected concentration.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Experiment 2: Escherichia coli counts observed on polypropylene surface. Values are expressed as percentage of means of replicates, compared to expected concentration.

    Techniques Used: Concentration Assay

    Experiment 2: Escherichia coli counts observed on stainless steel surface. Values are expressed as percentage of means of replicates, compared to expected concentration.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Experiment 2: Escherichia coli counts observed on stainless steel surface. Values are expressed as percentage of means of replicates, compared to expected concentration.

    Techniques Used: Concentration Assay

    11) Product Images from "Imipenem/cilastatin encapsulated polymeric nanoparticles for destroying carbapenem-resistant bacterial isolates"

    Article Title: Imipenem/cilastatin encapsulated polymeric nanoparticles for destroying carbapenem-resistant bacterial isolates

    Journal: Journal of Nanobiotechnology

    doi: 10.1186/s12951-017-0262-9

    Effect of carbapenemases on activity of imipenem/cilastatin (IMP), imipenem/cilastatin loaded polycaprolactone nanoparticles (IMP/PCL) and imipenem/cilastatin loaded polylactide- co -glycolide nanoparticles (IMP/PLGA) against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922
    Figure Legend Snippet: Effect of carbapenemases on activity of imipenem/cilastatin (IMP), imipenem/cilastatin loaded polycaprolactone nanoparticles (IMP/PCL) and imipenem/cilastatin loaded polylactide- co -glycolide nanoparticles (IMP/PLGA) against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922

    Techniques Used: Activity Assay

    12) Product Images from "Pathogenic Bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii Inhibits the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by Suppressing Neutrophil Adhesion"

    Article Title: Pathogenic Bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii Inhibits the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by Suppressing Neutrophil Adhesion

    Journal: Frontiers in Immunology

    doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2018.00178

    Inhibition of NET formation by bacteria other than Acinetobacter baumannii . Neutrophils and A. baumannii, A. calcoaceticus, A. hemolyticus , or Escherichia coli (MOI 50) were cocultured for 3 h, in the presence or absence of 200-nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Extracellular DNA was stained with SYTOX green and the signal quantified. The data are shown as the mean ± SD; n ≥ 3 per group; n.s., not significant; *** p
    Figure Legend Snippet: Inhibition of NET formation by bacteria other than Acinetobacter baumannii . Neutrophils and A. baumannii, A. calcoaceticus, A. hemolyticus , or Escherichia coli (MOI 50) were cocultured for 3 h, in the presence or absence of 200-nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Extracellular DNA was stained with SYTOX green and the signal quantified. The data are shown as the mean ± SD; n ≥ 3 per group; n.s., not significant; *** p

    Techniques Used: Inhibition, Staining

    13) Product Images from "Beneficial effects of extracts from Lucilia sericata maggots on burn wounds in rats"

    Article Title: Beneficial effects of extracts from Lucilia sericata maggots on burn wounds in rats

    Journal: Molecular Medicine Reports

    doi: 10.3892/mmr.2017.7566

    Partial purification and characterization of antibacterial components of MAE. (A) UV absorption characteristics of the various components. (B) Antibacterial tests. Various components (P1-P7) were tested on Escherichia coli (dose, 50 µg/ml). The antibacterial activity of P2 and P6 is presented. (C) SDS-PAGE analysis of the different components. Lane 1, P1; lane 2, P2; lane 3, P3; lane 4, P4; lane 5, P5; lane 6, P6; lane 7, P7. (D) Effects of MAE P1-P7 on hydroxyproline levels in the burn wound model. Data are expressed as the mean ± standard deviation. ## P
    Figure Legend Snippet: Partial purification and characterization of antibacterial components of MAE. (A) UV absorption characteristics of the various components. (B) Antibacterial tests. Various components (P1-P7) were tested on Escherichia coli (dose, 50 µg/ml). The antibacterial activity of P2 and P6 is presented. (C) SDS-PAGE analysis of the different components. Lane 1, P1; lane 2, P2; lane 3, P3; lane 4, P4; lane 5, P5; lane 6, P6; lane 7, P7. (D) Effects of MAE P1-P7 on hydroxyproline levels in the burn wound model. Data are expressed as the mean ± standard deviation. ## P

    Techniques Used: Purification, Activity Assay, SDS Page, Standard Deviation

    14) Product Images from "Botryococcus braunii as a bioreactor for the production of nanoparticles with antimicrobial potentialities"

    Article Title: Botryococcus braunii as a bioreactor for the production of nanoparticles with antimicrobial potentialities

    Journal: International Journal of Nanomedicine

    doi: 10.2147/IJN.S174205

    Antimicrobial activity and shape of the intracellularly biosynthesized AgNPs against selected pathogens: ( A ) Escherichia coli , ( B ) Pseudomonas aeruginosa , ( C ) Staphylococcus aureus , and ( D ) Candida albicans compared with ampicillin and a commercial AgNPs solution. Abbreviation: AgNPs, silver nanoparticles.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Antimicrobial activity and shape of the intracellularly biosynthesized AgNPs against selected pathogens: ( A ) Escherichia coli , ( B ) Pseudomonas aeruginosa , ( C ) Staphylococcus aureus , and ( D ) Candida albicans compared with ampicillin and a commercial AgNPs solution. Abbreviation: AgNPs, silver nanoparticles.

    Techniques Used: Activity Assay

    Antimicrobial activity and shape of the extracellularly biosynthesized AgNPs ( A ) Escherichia coli , ( B ) Pseudomonas aeruginosa , ( C ) Staphylococcus aureus , and ( D ) Candida albicans compared with an antibiotic solution and a commercial nanoparticle solution. Abbreviation: AgNPs, silver nanoparticles.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Antimicrobial activity and shape of the extracellularly biosynthesized AgNPs ( A ) Escherichia coli , ( B ) Pseudomonas aeruginosa , ( C ) Staphylococcus aureus , and ( D ) Candida albicans compared with an antibiotic solution and a commercial nanoparticle solution. Abbreviation: AgNPs, silver nanoparticles.

    Techniques Used: Activity Assay

    15) Product Images from "Silver-coated gold nanorods as a promising antimicrobial agent in the treatment of cancer-related infections"

    Article Title: Silver-coated gold nanorods as a promising antimicrobial agent in the treatment of cancer-related infections

    Journal: International Journal of Nanomedicine

    doi: 10.2147/IJN.S169489

    Bacteria growth curves for Gram-negative bacteria strains: ( A ) Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ( B ) Escherichia coli and Gram-positive bacteria strains, ( C ) Staphylococcus aureus , and ( D ) Staphylococcus epidermidis under different concentrations of Ag/AuNRs.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Bacteria growth curves for Gram-negative bacteria strains: ( A ) Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ( B ) Escherichia coli and Gram-positive bacteria strains, ( C ) Staphylococcus aureus , and ( D ) Staphylococcus epidermidis under different concentrations of Ag/AuNRs.

    Techniques Used:

    16) Product Images from "Clinico-microbiological study and antibiotic resistance profile of mecA and ESBL gene prevalence in patients with diabetic foot infections"

    Article Title: Clinico-microbiological study and antibiotic resistance profile of mecA and ESBL gene prevalence in patients with diabetic foot infections

    Journal: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine

    doi: 10.3892/etm.2016.2996

    Microbiology of DFUs. Distribution of microbes isolated from DFU samples. DFU, diabetic foot ulcer; SA, Staphylococcus aureus; E. coli, Escherichia coli ; PA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ; KP, Klebsiella pneumoniae ; spp, species.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Microbiology of DFUs. Distribution of microbes isolated from DFU samples. DFU, diabetic foot ulcer; SA, Staphylococcus aureus; E. coli, Escherichia coli ; PA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ; KP, Klebsiella pneumoniae ; spp, species.

    Techniques Used: Isolation

    17) Product Images from "Rapid Identification of Fungi by Using the ITS2 Genetic Region and an Automated Fluorescent Capillary Electrophoresis System"

    Article Title: Rapid Identification of Fungi by Using the ITS2 Genetic Region and an Automated Fluorescent Capillary Electrophoresis System

    Journal: Journal of Clinical Microbiology

    doi:

    Specificity of universal ITS2 primers against bacteria and human genomic DNA. PCR amplification using the ITS4 and ITS86 primer pair was performed as described in Materials and Methods. The following DNA templates were used for PCR (by lane): 1, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228; 2, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922; 3, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923; 4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853; 5, Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124; 6, human whole blood; 7, human leukocytes; 8, human liver; 9, Candida albicans ATCC 10231; and 10, H 2 O contamination control.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Specificity of universal ITS2 primers against bacteria and human genomic DNA. PCR amplification using the ITS4 and ITS86 primer pair was performed as described in Materials and Methods. The following DNA templates were used for PCR (by lane): 1, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228; 2, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922; 3, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923; 4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853; 5, Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124; 6, human whole blood; 7, human leukocytes; 8, human liver; 9, Candida albicans ATCC 10231; and 10, H 2 O contamination control.

    Techniques Used: Polymerase Chain Reaction, Amplification

    18) Product Images from "Nanohydroxyapatite Reinforced Chitosan Composite Hydrogel with Tunable Mechanical and Biological Properties for Cartilage Regeneration"

    Article Title: Nanohydroxyapatite Reinforced Chitosan Composite Hydrogel with Tunable Mechanical and Biological Properties for Cartilage Regeneration

    Journal: Scientific Reports

    doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-52042-7

    Antimicrobial activity of CS and CS/1.5HANr composites against Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans .
    Figure Legend Snippet: Antimicrobial activity of CS and CS/1.5HANr composites against Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans .

    Techniques Used: Activity Assay

    19) Product Images from "Biofilm Formation Plays a Role in the Formation of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Toward Nutrients in Microcosm Experiments"

    Article Title: Biofilm Formation Plays a Role in the Formation of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Toward Nutrients in Microcosm Experiments

    Journal: Frontiers in Microbiology

    doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2018.00367

    Escherichia coli biofilm developed by different-dose groups in test tubes. R, resistant; I, intermediate; S, sensitive.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Escherichia coli biofilm developed by different-dose groups in test tubes. R, resistant; I, intermediate; S, sensitive.

    Techniques Used:

    Escherichia coli biofilm developed by different-dose groups at different time points. Different lowercase letters indicate significant differences ( P
    Figure Legend Snippet: Escherichia coli biofilm developed by different-dose groups at different time points. Different lowercase letters indicate significant differences ( P

    Techniques Used:

    20) Product Images from "Biofilm Formation Plays a Role in the Formation of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Toward Nutrients in Microcosm Experiments"

    Article Title: Biofilm Formation Plays a Role in the Formation of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Toward Nutrients in Microcosm Experiments

    Journal: Frontiers in Microbiology

    doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2018.00367

    Escherichia coli biofilm developed by different-dose groups in test tubes. R, resistant; I, intermediate; S, sensitive.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Escherichia coli biofilm developed by different-dose groups in test tubes. R, resistant; I, intermediate; S, sensitive.

    Techniques Used:

    Escherichia coli biofilm developed by different-dose groups at different time points. Different lowercase letters indicate significant differences ( P
    Figure Legend Snippet: Escherichia coli biofilm developed by different-dose groups at different time points. Different lowercase letters indicate significant differences ( P

    Techniques Used:

    21) Product Images from "Integrated multi-channel optical system for bacteria characterization and its potential use for monitoring of environmental bacteria"

    Article Title: Integrated multi-channel optical system for bacteria characterization and its potential use for monitoring of environmental bacteria

    Journal: Biomedical Optics Express

    doi: 10.1364/BOE.10.001165

    The representative monochromatic 2D transmission coefficient distribution of: (A) Bacillus subtilis , (B) Rahnella aquatilis (x31E), (C) Rahnella aquatilis (x21N), (D) Citrobacter freundii , (E) Escherichia coli , (F) Proteus mirabilis , (G) Pseudomonas aeruginosa , (H) Staphylococcus aureus , (I) Staphylococcus intermedius colonies obtained under monochromatic illumination (color scale represents values of transmission coefficient).
    Figure Legend Snippet: The representative monochromatic 2D transmission coefficient distribution of: (A) Bacillus subtilis , (B) Rahnella aquatilis (x31E), (C) Rahnella aquatilis (x21N), (D) Citrobacter freundii , (E) Escherichia coli , (F) Proteus mirabilis , (G) Pseudomonas aeruginosa , (H) Staphylococcus aureus , (I) Staphylococcus intermedius colonies obtained under monochromatic illumination (color scale represents values of transmission coefficient).

    Techniques Used: Transmission Assay

    An exemplary image of the sample plate containing various colonies ( Bacillus subtilis (marked red), Citrobacter freundii (green numbers), Escherichia coli (yellow), Proteus mirabilis (blue)) and their Fresnel diffraction patterns enabling identification of indicated colonies. The red-dashed oval indicates the overlapping colonies, which cannot be differentiated.
    Figure Legend Snippet: An exemplary image of the sample plate containing various colonies ( Bacillus subtilis (marked red), Citrobacter freundii (green numbers), Escherichia coli (yellow), Proteus mirabilis (blue)) and their Fresnel diffraction patterns enabling identification of indicated colonies. The red-dashed oval indicates the overlapping colonies, which cannot be differentiated.

    Techniques Used:

    22) Product Images from "Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations"

    Article Title: Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations

    Journal: PeerJ

    doi: 10.7717/peerj.6460

    Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.

    Techniques Used: Environmental Sampling

    23) Product Images from "Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations"

    Article Title: Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations

    Journal: PeerJ

    doi: 10.7717/peerj.6460

    Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.

    Techniques Used: Environmental Sampling

    24) Product Images from "Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations"

    Article Title: Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations

    Journal: PeerJ

    doi: 10.7717/peerj.6460

    Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.

    Techniques Used: Environmental Sampling

    25) Product Images from "Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations"

    Article Title: Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations

    Journal: PeerJ

    doi: 10.7717/peerj.6460

    Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.

    Techniques Used: Environmental Sampling

    26) Product Images from "Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations"

    Article Title: Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations

    Journal: PeerJ

    doi: 10.7717/peerj.6460

    Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.

    Techniques Used: Environmental Sampling

    27) Product Images from "Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations"

    Article Title: Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations

    Journal: PeerJ

    doi: 10.7717/peerj.6460

    Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.

    Techniques Used: Environmental Sampling

    28) Product Images from "Clinico-microbiological study and antibiotic resistance profile of mecA and ESBL gene prevalence in patients with diabetic foot infections"

    Article Title: Clinico-microbiological study and antibiotic resistance profile of mecA and ESBL gene prevalence in patients with diabetic foot infections

    Journal: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine

    doi: 10.3892/etm.2016.2996

    Microbiology of DFUs. Distribution of microbes isolated from DFU samples. DFU, diabetic foot ulcer; SA, Staphylococcus aureus; E. coli, Escherichia coli ; PA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ; KP, Klebsiella pneumoniae ; spp, species.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Microbiology of DFUs. Distribution of microbes isolated from DFU samples. DFU, diabetic foot ulcer; SA, Staphylococcus aureus; E. coli, Escherichia coli ; PA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ; KP, Klebsiella pneumoniae ; spp, species.

    Techniques Used: Isolation

    29) Product Images from "Interactions of Segmented Filamentous Bacteria (Candidatus Savagella) and bacterial drivers in colitis-associated colorectal cancer development"

    Article Title: Interactions of Segmented Filamentous Bacteria (Candidatus Savagella) and bacterial drivers in colitis-associated colorectal cancer development

    Journal: PLoS ONE

    doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0236595

    SFB stabilizes the GM and prevents large shifts in GM structure following Helicobacter spp. inoculation. A) Relative abundance of OTUs within CRC+ and CRC- mice in SFB- and SFB+ groups, shown as group means at pre-inoculation (P), after the first inoculation (M), and at day 1 (D1), D4, D7, and two weeks (2W) PI. Yellow-orange represents Helicobacter spp. (including Helicobacter ambiguous taxa and Helicobacter uncultured bacterium ) and light blue represents Family Enterobacteriaceae (more specifically denoted as Escherichia-Shigella Escherichia sp.). These are indicated by arrows. B) Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of Pre and D4 samples of each mouse in SFB+ (green) and SFB- (purple) groups. Length of line denotes overall change in composition from Pre to D4 in each mouse. C) Mean (±SD) shifts in GM community shown in B, using Bray-Curtis Dissimilarity Index. Mann-Whitney Rank Sum test p = 0.021.
    Figure Legend Snippet: SFB stabilizes the GM and prevents large shifts in GM structure following Helicobacter spp. inoculation. A) Relative abundance of OTUs within CRC+ and CRC- mice in SFB- and SFB+ groups, shown as group means at pre-inoculation (P), after the first inoculation (M), and at day 1 (D1), D4, D7, and two weeks (2W) PI. Yellow-orange represents Helicobacter spp. (including Helicobacter ambiguous taxa and Helicobacter uncultured bacterium ) and light blue represents Family Enterobacteriaceae (more specifically denoted as Escherichia-Shigella Escherichia sp.). These are indicated by arrows. B) Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of Pre and D4 samples of each mouse in SFB+ (green) and SFB- (purple) groups. Length of line denotes overall change in composition from Pre to D4 in each mouse. C) Mean (±SD) shifts in GM community shown in B, using Bray-Curtis Dissimilarity Index. Mann-Whitney Rank Sum test p = 0.021.

    Techniques Used: Mouse Assay, MANN-WHITNEY

    Relative abundance of Helicobacter spp. at D4 PI predictive of CRC development in SFB- but not SFB+ mice. Family Enterobacteriaceae and SFB interact in CRC development. Relative abundance of (A) Helicobacter spp. and (B) family Enterobacteriaceae ( Escherichia-Shigella Escherichia sp.) from Pre-inoculation to 3W PI in SFB- and SFB+ Helicobacter spp.-inoculated mice. Two-way RM ANOVA performed for SFB- and SFB+ mice separately: like letters denote significant ( p
    Figure Legend Snippet: Relative abundance of Helicobacter spp. at D4 PI predictive of CRC development in SFB- but not SFB+ mice. Family Enterobacteriaceae and SFB interact in CRC development. Relative abundance of (A) Helicobacter spp. and (B) family Enterobacteriaceae ( Escherichia-Shigella Escherichia sp.) from Pre-inoculation to 3W PI in SFB- and SFB+ Helicobacter spp.-inoculated mice. Two-way RM ANOVA performed for SFB- and SFB+ mice separately: like letters denote significant ( p

    Techniques Used: Mouse Assay

    30) Product Images from "Pharmacokinetics of Linezolid and Ertapenem in experimental parapneumonic pleural effusion"

    Article Title: Pharmacokinetics of Linezolid and Ertapenem in experimental parapneumonic pleural effusion

    Journal: Journal of Inflammation (London, England)

    doi: 10.1186/1476-9255-7-22

    Linezolid concentrations (mean ± sd, mcg/mL) in blood serum (circles) and pleural fluid (squares), in an experimental rabbit model of pleural empyema induced by inoculation with Escherichia coli (ATCC 35218), after the i.v. administration of an linezolid solution (10 mg/kg) to 10 New Zealand white rabbits .
    Figure Legend Snippet: Linezolid concentrations (mean ± sd, mcg/mL) in blood serum (circles) and pleural fluid (squares), in an experimental rabbit model of pleural empyema induced by inoculation with Escherichia coli (ATCC 35218), after the i.v. administration of an linezolid solution (10 mg/kg) to 10 New Zealand white rabbits .

    Techniques Used:

    31) Product Images from "Synthesis of New Fluoro-Benzimidazole Derivatives as an Approach towards the Discovery of Novel Intestinal Antiseptic Drug Candidates"

    Article Title: Synthesis of New Fluoro-Benzimidazole Derivatives as an Approach towards the Discovery of Novel Intestinal Antiseptic Drug Candidates

    Journal: Current Pharmaceutical Design

    doi: 10.2174/1381612822666161201150131

    LCMS-IT-TOF chromatogram and spectra of the compound 18. A: The LC-MS chromatogram of compound 18 before incubation with E. coli O157:H7. B: The positive ionisation HR-MS spectra of compound 18 before incubation with E. coli O157:H7. C:The LC-MS chromatogram of Escherichia coli O157:H7inocula with compound 18 after incubation. D: The positive ionisation HR-MS spectra of E. coli O157:H7 inocula with compound 18 after incubation.
    Figure Legend Snippet: LCMS-IT-TOF chromatogram and spectra of the compound 18. A: The LC-MS chromatogram of compound 18 before incubation with E. coli O157:H7. B: The positive ionisation HR-MS spectra of compound 18 before incubation with E. coli O157:H7. C:The LC-MS chromatogram of Escherichia coli O157:H7inocula with compound 18 after incubation. D: The positive ionisation HR-MS spectra of E. coli O157:H7 inocula with compound 18 after incubation.

    Techniques Used: Liquid Chromatography with Mass Spectroscopy, Incubation, Mass Spectrometry

    32) Product Images from "Burst Release of Antibiotics Combined with Long-Term Release of Silver Targeting Implant-Associated Infections: Design, Characterization and in vitro Evaluation of Novel Implant Hybrid Surface"

    Article Title: Burst Release of Antibiotics Combined with Long-Term Release of Silver Targeting Implant-Associated Infections: Design, Characterization and in vitro Evaluation of Novel Implant Hybrid Surface

    Journal: Materials

    doi: 10.3390/ma12233838

    Proliferation of Escherichia coli after 24-h direct contact with the test surface. The means and standard errors of 3 (hybrid plates and ST plates) or 2 (PS plates and U plates) replicates are shown.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Proliferation of Escherichia coli after 24-h direct contact with the test surface. The means and standard errors of 3 (hybrid plates and ST plates) or 2 (PS plates and U plates) replicates are shown.

    Techniques Used:

    33) Product Images from "Design, synthesis and antimicrobial activity of usnic acid derivatives"

    Article Title: Design, synthesis and antimicrobial activity of usnic acid derivatives

    Journal: MedChemComm

    doi: 10.1039/c8md00076j

    Docked conformation of the two most active compounds 9 (A1 and 2) and 3 (B1 and 2) in Escherichia coli primase.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Docked conformation of the two most active compounds 9 (A1 and 2) and 3 (B1 and 2) in Escherichia coli primase.

    Techniques Used:

    34) Product Images from "Tissue expression and antibacterial activity of host defense peptides in chicken"

    Article Title: Tissue expression and antibacterial activity of host defense peptides in chicken

    Journal: BMC Veterinary Research

    doi: 10.1186/s12917-016-0866-6

    Escherichia coli viability and membrane damage following treatment with cathelicidins. Membrane damage in E. coli treated with each synthetic cathelicidin peptide (5 μM) was detected with a LIVE/DEAD BacLight Bacterial Viability Kit. Green fluorescence indicates live bacteria with intact membranes; red fluorescence indicates dead bacteria with damaged membranes. CATH1 cathelicidin1, CATH2 cathelicidin2, CATH3 cathelicidin3, and CATHB1 cathelicidinB1
    Figure Legend Snippet: Escherichia coli viability and membrane damage following treatment with cathelicidins. Membrane damage in E. coli treated with each synthetic cathelicidin peptide (5 μM) was detected with a LIVE/DEAD BacLight Bacterial Viability Kit. Green fluorescence indicates live bacteria with intact membranes; red fluorescence indicates dead bacteria with damaged membranes. CATH1 cathelicidin1, CATH2 cathelicidin2, CATH3 cathelicidin3, and CATHB1 cathelicidinB1

    Techniques Used: Fluorescence

    35) Product Images from "The effects of low levels of trivalent ions on a standard strain of Escherichia coli ( ATCC 11775) in aqueous solutions. The effects of low levels of trivalent ions on a standard strain of Escherichia coli (ATCC 11775) in aqueous solutions"

    Article Title: The effects of low levels of trivalent ions on a standard strain of Escherichia coli ( ATCC 11775) in aqueous solutions. The effects of low levels of trivalent ions on a standard strain of Escherichia coli (ATCC 11775) in aqueous solutions

    Journal: MicrobiologyOpen

    doi: 10.1002/mbo3.574

    Photographs of the coliform colonies obtained from defined volume samples of 50 CFU /ml density ATCC 11775 strain Escherichia coli diluted suspension solutions with 10 −3 mol/L NaCl, with and without LaCl 3 , following membrane filtration process, and then 24 hr of incubation at 37°C with m‐ColiBlue24 broth. (a) 1 ml of the suspension solution without LaCl 3 (b) 1 ml of the suspension solution with 10 −5 mol/L LaCl 3 (c) 100 ml of the suspension solution with 10 −5 mol/L LaCl 3 (d) 1 ml of the suspension solution with 10 −6 mol/L LaCl 3 (e) 100 ml of the suspension solution with 10 −6 mol/L LaCl 3
    Figure Legend Snippet: Photographs of the coliform colonies obtained from defined volume samples of 50 CFU /ml density ATCC 11775 strain Escherichia coli diluted suspension solutions with 10 −3 mol/L NaCl, with and without LaCl 3 , following membrane filtration process, and then 24 hr of incubation at 37°C with m‐ColiBlue24 broth. (a) 1 ml of the suspension solution without LaCl 3 (b) 1 ml of the suspension solution with 10 −5 mol/L LaCl 3 (c) 100 ml of the suspension solution with 10 −5 mol/L LaCl 3 (d) 1 ml of the suspension solution with 10 −6 mol/L LaCl 3 (e) 100 ml of the suspension solution with 10 −6 mol/L LaCl 3

    Techniques Used: Filtration, Incubation

    36) Product Images from "Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations"

    Article Title: Considerations for studying transmission of antimicrobial resistant enteric bacteria between wild birds and the environment on intensive dairy and beef cattle operations

    Journal: PeerJ

    doi: 10.7717/peerj.6460

    Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli by site and isolate source. Genomic diversity of Escherichia coli at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by site for both sources (A), from just bird feces (B), and from just environmental swabs (C). Sample points are labelled by site and source and colored by site. The first letter indicates source: D, Dairy (green); A, Beef A (orange); B, Beef B (blue), and C, Control (red). The second letter indicates sample source: B, bird feces or swab; E, environmental swab.

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage (±95% CI of proportions; total n for each group provided at bar bases) of Escherichia coli (A) and Enterococcus (B) isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. The total proportions of Escherichia coli isolates resistant to one or more antimicrobial drug at each farm site did not differ significantly from the Control (Pairwise comparisons with Control as referent: all p > 0.05). Enterococcus isolates from the farm sites has significantly higher proportions of resistant isolates for two of three sites (Fisher’s exact, pair-wise comparisons with Control as referent: Dairy p = 0.001, Beef A p = 0.080, Beef B p = 0.0002).

    Techniques Used:

    Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Prevalence of resistance to one or more antimicrobial drugs by site, bacterial genus, and isolate source. Percentage of Escherichia coli (A and C) and Enterococcus (B and D) isolates resistant to none, one, or more antimicrobial drugs at a residential control and three cattle farm sites in central Illinois by sample source. Escherichia coli resistant to more than one antimicrobial drug were primarily found in bird and environmental samples from the Dairy site. In contrast, Enterococcus isolates were seen in both sample types at all three farm facilities but less commonly at the Control.

    Techniques Used: Environmental Sampling

    37) Product Images from "Effects of Ligustrum robustum on gut microbes and obesity in rats"

    Article Title: Effects of Ligustrum robustum on gut microbes and obesity in rats

    Journal: World Journal of Gastroenterology

    doi: 10.3748/wjg.v21.i46.13042

    Antimicrobial activity of Ligustrum robustum on gut bacteria. MIC: Minimum inhibitory concentration; MBC: Minimum bactericidal concentration; -: Gram negative bacteria; +: Gram positive bacteria; EAEC: Entero-aggregative Escherichia coli ; EHEC: Entero-hemorrhagic Escherichia coli ; ETEC: Entero-toxigenic Escherichia coli ; EPEC: Entero-pathogenic Escherichia coli ; EIEC: Entero-invasive Escherichia coli .
    Figure Legend Snippet: Antimicrobial activity of Ligustrum robustum on gut bacteria. MIC: Minimum inhibitory concentration; MBC: Minimum bactericidal concentration; -: Gram negative bacteria; +: Gram positive bacteria; EAEC: Entero-aggregative Escherichia coli ; EHEC: Entero-hemorrhagic Escherichia coli ; ETEC: Entero-toxigenic Escherichia coli ; EPEC: Entero-pathogenic Escherichia coli ; EIEC: Entero-invasive Escherichia coli .

    Techniques Used: Activity Assay, Concentration Assay

    38) Product Images from "Raman Spectroscopy as a Potential Tool for Detection of Brucella spp. in Milk"

    Article Title: Raman Spectroscopy as a Potential Tool for Detection of Brucella spp. in Milk

    Journal: Applied and Environmental Microbiology

    doi: 10.1128/AEM.00637-12

    The mean spectra of Brucella spp. (Ab, Bb, Cb, and Db) from media were compared to the mean spectra of Escherichia (Aa), Ochrobactrum (Ba), Pseudomonas (Ca), and Yersinia (Da) spp. isolated from medium by calculating the loading vector (Ac, Bc, Cc, and Dc) of a two-class LDA with five PCs.
    Figure Legend Snippet: The mean spectra of Brucella spp. (Ab, Bb, Cb, and Db) from media were compared to the mean spectra of Escherichia (Aa), Ochrobactrum (Ba), Pseudomonas (Ca), and Yersinia (Da) spp. isolated from medium by calculating the loading vector (Ac, Bc, Cc, and Dc) of a two-class LDA with five PCs.

    Techniques Used: Isolation, Plasmid Preparation

    39) Product Images from "Surface Grafted Polysarcosine as a Peptoid Antifouling Polymer Brush"

    Article Title: Surface Grafted Polysarcosine as a Peptoid Antifouling Polymer Brush

    Journal: Langmuir : the ACS journal of surfaces and colloids

    doi: 10.1021/la302131n

    The ability of PSAR-10 and PSAR-20 brushes to resist attachment of bacteria over 24 h. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was seeded at 3×10 7 CFU/mL and Escherichia coli was seeded at 6×10 8 CFU/mL. Staphylococcus epidermidis was seeded at 4×10
    Figure Legend Snippet: The ability of PSAR-10 and PSAR-20 brushes to resist attachment of bacteria over 24 h. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was seeded at 3×10 7 CFU/mL and Escherichia coli was seeded at 6×10 8 CFU/mL. Staphylococcus epidermidis was seeded at 4×10

    Techniques Used:

    40) Product Images from "TH17 cells promote microbial killing and innate immune sensing of DNA via interleukin 26"

    Article Title: TH17 cells promote microbial killing and innate immune sensing of DNA via interleukin 26

    Journal: Nature immunology

    doi: 10.1038/ni.3211

    IL-26 has direct bactericidal properties. ( a ) Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 ( P. aerug. ), Escherichia coli O1:K1:H7 ( E. coli ), Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 ( S. aureus ) and Klebsiella pneumoniae O1:K2 ( K. pneumo. ) in culture with increasing
    Figure Legend Snippet: IL-26 has direct bactericidal properties. ( a ) Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 ( P. aerug. ), Escherichia coli O1:K1:H7 ( E. coli ), Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 ( S. aureus ) and Klebsiella pneumoniae O1:K2 ( K. pneumo. ) in culture with increasing

    Techniques Used:

    Related Articles

    Sequencing:

    Article Title: TiO2 Photocatalysis Damages Lipids and Proteins in Escherichia coli
    Article Snippet: .. Under these conditions, the estimated coverage of the theoretical proteome of E. coli ATCC 8739 was 62%, as inferred from an in silico analysis of E. coli protein sequence data obtained from NCBI (data not shown). .. Image analysis of the 2-DE gels was performed using the PD Quest 8.0.1 software program (Bio-Rad).

    Incubation:

    Article Title: Time-Kill Kinetics of Lipid Fractions Isolated from Condiments against Foodborne Pathogens
    Article Snippet: .. At 60 min of incubation, leakage of intracellular components was the highest in E. coli ATCC 8739 when it was treated with ethanolic lipid fraction of black cumin. .. However, the highest constituent release after 120 min of contact time was observed with Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 13932 when treated with lipid fraction of bay leaf.

    Article Title: Time-Kill Kinetics of Lipid Fractions Isolated from Condiments against Foodborne Pathogens
    Article Snippet: .. Selected foodborne pathogens, namely Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 13932, Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802, Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778 and Vibrio alginolyticus ATCC 17749, were incubated in tryptone soya broth at 37 °C for 18 h. The bacterial count was 1.5·108 CFU/mL. ..

    Activity Assay:

    Article Title: Anti-microorganism, anti-tumor, and immune activities of a novel polysaccharide isolated from Tricholoma matsutake
    Article Snippet: .. Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739, Gram-negative), Staphylococcus albus (ATCC 8799, Gram-positive), Brevibacillus laterosporus (ACCC 10274, Gram-negative), Bacillus subtilis (CGMCC 1.1507, Gram-positive), Micrococcus lysodeikticus (CGMCC 1.634, Gram-positive), Salmonella sp . (CGMCC 1.1552, G-), Gibberella fujikuroi (ACCC 30941), Fusarium graminearum (CGMCC 3.3631), Aspergillus niger (CMCC 98003), Penicillium sp . (ACCC 30106), and Aspergillus flavus (CGMCC 3.6434) microorganism strains were employed for determination of the antimicrobial activity. ..

    In Silico:

    Article Title: TiO2 Photocatalysis Damages Lipids and Proteins in Escherichia coli
    Article Snippet: .. Under these conditions, the estimated coverage of the theoretical proteome of E. coli ATCC 8739 was 62%, as inferred from an in silico analysis of E. coli protein sequence data obtained from NCBI (data not shown). .. Image analysis of the 2-DE gels was performed using the PD Quest 8.0.1 software program (Bio-Rad).

    Expressing:

    Article Title: N-Acetylgalactosamine Utilization Pathway and Regulon in Proteobacteria
    Article Snippet: .. For complementation analysis, the full-length coding regions of agaS and/or agaY (EcolC_0561) genes from E. coli ATCC 8739 were PCR-amplified using the primers shown in and inserted downstream into the lac promoter in the pUC118 expression vector (Novagen). .. The resulting plasmids were then electroporated into the E. coli ATCC 8739 Δ agaS knock-out mutant.

    Polymerase Chain Reaction:

    Article Title: N-Acetylgalactosamine Utilization Pathway and Regulon in Proteobacteria
    Article Snippet: .. For complementation analysis, the full-length coding regions of agaS and/or agaY (EcolC_0561) genes from E. coli ATCC 8739 were PCR-amplified using the primers shown in and inserted downstream into the lac promoter in the pUC118 expression vector (Novagen). .. The resulting plasmids were then electroporated into the E. coli ATCC 8739 Δ agaS knock-out mutant.

    Plasmid Preparation:

    Article Title: N-Acetylgalactosamine Utilization Pathway and Regulon in Proteobacteria
    Article Snippet: .. For complementation analysis, the full-length coding regions of agaS and/or agaY (EcolC_0561) genes from E. coli ATCC 8739 were PCR-amplified using the primers shown in and inserted downstream into the lac promoter in the pUC118 expression vector (Novagen). .. The resulting plasmids were then electroporated into the E. coli ATCC 8739 Δ agaS knock-out mutant.

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  • hopd  (ATCC)
    93
    ATCC hopd
    Various engineering strategies employed for enhanced production of squalene in E. coli . (A) Ghimire et al. ( 2009 ) expressed <t>hopD</t> and hopAB from Streptomyces peucetius followed by overexpression of dxs and idi , (B) Pan et al. ( 2015 ) expressed hpnC, hpnD , and hpnE from Zymomonas mobilis or Rhodopseudomonas palustris (C) Furubayashi et al. ( 2014a ) expressed hSQS , (D) Katabami et al. ( 2015 ) expressed hSQS or tSQS from Thermosynechococcus elongates, atoB, HMGS, HMGR, HK, PMK, PMD from S. cerevisiae followed by overexpression of idi and ispA . GA3P, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate; DXP, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate; dxs, DXP synthase; IPP, isopentenyl pyrophosphate; idi, isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase; DMAPP, dimethylallyl diphosphate; ispA, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase; GPP, geranyl diphosphate; FPP, isopentenyl pyrophosphate; hopD, farnesyl diphosphate synthase; hopAB, <t>squalene/phytoene</t> synthases; hpnC, hydroxyl squalene synthase; hpnD, presqualene diphosphate synthase; hpnE, hydroxysqualene dehydroxylase; hSQS, human squalene synthase; tSQS, Thermosynechococcus SQS; atoB, acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase; HMGS, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase; HMGR, HMG-CoA reductase; HK, mevalonate kinase; PMK, phosphomevalonate kinase; PMD, mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase.
    Hopd, supplied by ATCC, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 93/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
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    92
    ATCC putative α glucosidase enzymes
    HPAEC profiles of oligosaccharides in 1 = the GL34 mixture (1 mg mL − 1 , blank) and the hydrolysis products after incubation of GL34 with 2 = α-amylase from porcine; 3 = α-amylase from A. oryzae ; 4 = <t>α-glucosidase</t> from yeast; 5 = iso-amylase from Pseudomonas sp . ; 6 = pullulanase type 1 from K. planticola ; 7 = β-galactosidase from A. oryzae and 8 = β-galactosidase from K. lactis
    Putative α Glucosidase Enzymes, supplied by ATCC, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 92/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
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    91
    ATCC metagenomic data
    Evaluation on sequence fragmentation of the output proteins of the seven approaches in the synthetic <t>metagenomic</t> dataset. ( A ) Percentage of assembled sequences with completeness of at least 50% or ( B ) full-length recalled sequences (completeness of 90% or higher) for each of the 64 prokaryotic genomes in the synthetic metagenomic dataset.
    Metagenomic Data, supplied by ATCC, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 91/100, based on 10 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
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    80
    ATCC formalin killed e coli cells
    Maximum lesion size of mice challenged with either  P. gingivalis  ATCC 33277 (A) or W50 (B). BALB/c mice were immunized s.c. with the RgpA-Kgp proteinase complex (50 μg), formalin-killed (FK)  P. gingivalis  cells (2 × 10 8  of either strain ATCC 33277 or strain W50), formalin-killed  E. coli  cells (2 × 10 8 ), or PBS administered in IFA for both the primary and secondary doses. All mice were challenged 12 days after the secondary immunization with either  P. gingivalis  strain ATCC 33277 (7.5 × 10 9  viable cells) or W50 (3 × 10 9  viable cells) and were weighed, and the lesion sizes were measured daily over 14 days. Lesion sizes were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney U-Wilcoxon rank sum test. ∗, Groups significantly different ( P
    Formalin Killed E Coli Cells, supplied by ATCC, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 80/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
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    Image Search Results


    Various engineering strategies employed for enhanced production of squalene in E. coli . (A) Ghimire et al. ( 2009 ) expressed hopD and hopAB from Streptomyces peucetius followed by overexpression of dxs and idi , (B) Pan et al. ( 2015 ) expressed hpnC, hpnD , and hpnE from Zymomonas mobilis or Rhodopseudomonas palustris (C) Furubayashi et al. ( 2014a ) expressed hSQS , (D) Katabami et al. ( 2015 ) expressed hSQS or tSQS from Thermosynechococcus elongates, atoB, HMGS, HMGR, HK, PMK, PMD from S. cerevisiae followed by overexpression of idi and ispA . GA3P, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate; DXP, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate; dxs, DXP synthase; IPP, isopentenyl pyrophosphate; idi, isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase; DMAPP, dimethylallyl diphosphate; ispA, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase; GPP, geranyl diphosphate; FPP, isopentenyl pyrophosphate; hopD, farnesyl diphosphate synthase; hopAB, squalene/phytoene synthases; hpnC, hydroxyl squalene synthase; hpnD, presqualene diphosphate synthase; hpnE, hydroxysqualene dehydroxylase; hSQS, human squalene synthase; tSQS, Thermosynechococcus SQS; atoB, acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase; HMGS, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase; HMGR, HMG-CoA reductase; HK, mevalonate kinase; PMK, phosphomevalonate kinase; PMD, mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase.

    Journal: Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology

    Article Title: Engineering Strategies in Microorganisms for the Enhanced Production of Squalene: Advances, Challenges and Opportunities

    doi: 10.3389/fbioe.2019.00050

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Various engineering strategies employed for enhanced production of squalene in E. coli . (A) Ghimire et al. ( 2009 ) expressed hopD and hopAB from Streptomyces peucetius followed by overexpression of dxs and idi , (B) Pan et al. ( 2015 ) expressed hpnC, hpnD , and hpnE from Zymomonas mobilis or Rhodopseudomonas palustris (C) Furubayashi et al. ( 2014a ) expressed hSQS , (D) Katabami et al. ( 2015 ) expressed hSQS or tSQS from Thermosynechococcus elongates, atoB, HMGS, HMGR, HK, PMK, PMD from S. cerevisiae followed by overexpression of idi and ispA . GA3P, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate; DXP, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate; dxs, DXP synthase; IPP, isopentenyl pyrophosphate; idi, isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase; DMAPP, dimethylallyl diphosphate; ispA, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase; GPP, geranyl diphosphate; FPP, isopentenyl pyrophosphate; hopD, farnesyl diphosphate synthase; hopAB, squalene/phytoene synthases; hpnC, hydroxyl squalene synthase; hpnD, presqualene diphosphate synthase; hpnE, hydroxysqualene dehydroxylase; hSQS, human squalene synthase; tSQS, Thermosynechococcus SQS; atoB, acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase; HMGS, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase; HMGR, HMG-CoA reductase; HK, mevalonate kinase; PMK, phosphomevalonate kinase; PMD, mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase.

    Article Snippet: In the first systematic study, three hopanoid genes including hopA, hopB (encodes squalene/phytoene synthases), and hopD (encodes farnesyl diphosphate synthase) from Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952 were successfully inserted and expressed in E. coli .

    Techniques: Over Expression

    HPAEC profiles of oligosaccharides in 1 = the GL34 mixture (1 mg mL − 1 , blank) and the hydrolysis products after incubation of GL34 with 2 = α-amylase from porcine; 3 = α-amylase from A. oryzae ; 4 = α-glucosidase from yeast; 5 = iso-amylase from Pseudomonas sp . ; 6 = pullulanase type 1 from K. planticola ; 7 = β-galactosidase from A. oryzae and 8 = β-galactosidase from K. lactis

    Journal: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

    Article Title: Stimulatory effects of novel glucosylated lactose derivatives GL34 on growth of selected gut bacteria

    doi: 10.1007/s00253-018-9473-8

    Figure Lengend Snippet: HPAEC profiles of oligosaccharides in 1 = the GL34 mixture (1 mg mL − 1 , blank) and the hydrolysis products after incubation of GL34 with 2 = α-amylase from porcine; 3 = α-amylase from A. oryzae ; 4 = α-glucosidase from yeast; 5 = iso-amylase from Pseudomonas sp . ; 6 = pullulanase type 1 from K. planticola ; 7 = β-galactosidase from A. oryzae and 8 = β-galactosidase from K. lactis

    Article Snippet: Ten putative α-glucosidase enzymes (family GH13 and GH31) were annotated in the L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 genome.

    Techniques: Incubation

    Evaluation on sequence fragmentation of the output proteins of the seven approaches in the synthetic metagenomic dataset. ( A ) Percentage of assembled sequences with completeness of at least 50% or ( B ) full-length recalled sequences (completeness of 90% or higher) for each of the 64 prokaryotic genomes in the synthetic metagenomic dataset.

    Journal: Nucleic Acids Research

    Article Title: Amino acid based de Bruijn graph algorithm for identifying complete coding genes from metagenomic and metatranscriptomic short reads

    doi: 10.1093/nar/gkz017

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Evaluation on sequence fragmentation of the output proteins of the seven approaches in the synthetic metagenomic dataset. ( A ) Percentage of assembled sequences with completeness of at least 50% or ( B ) full-length recalled sequences (completeness of 90% or higher) for each of the 64 prokaryotic genomes in the synthetic metagenomic dataset.

    Article Snippet: Consistently, the majority of assembled proteins (20 475, 68.9%) accounting for 80.3% of assembled reads, came from the 19 species detected in the metagenomic data, exhibiting similar abundance variation pattern as reported by Giannoukos et al. : Prevotella copri DSM 18205, as the most transcriptionally active species, occupied 53.9% of total assembled reads, followed by Bacteroides vulgatus ATCC 8482 (11.7%) and Bacteroides dorei 5_1_36/D4 (11.5%).

    Techniques: Sequencing

    Performance of the seven approaches on real metagenomic sequencing data of a human stool sample. (A) Recall and (B) precision values are displayed in different levels of completeness.

    Journal: Nucleic Acids Research

    Article Title: Amino acid based de Bruijn graph algorithm for identifying complete coding genes from metagenomic and metatranscriptomic short reads

    doi: 10.1093/nar/gkz017

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Performance of the seven approaches on real metagenomic sequencing data of a human stool sample. (A) Recall and (B) precision values are displayed in different levels of completeness.

    Article Snippet: Consistently, the majority of assembled proteins (20 475, 68.9%) accounting for 80.3% of assembled reads, came from the 19 species detected in the metagenomic data, exhibiting similar abundance variation pattern as reported by Giannoukos et al. : Prevotella copri DSM 18205, as the most transcriptionally active species, occupied 53.9% of total assembled reads, followed by Bacteroides vulgatus ATCC 8482 (11.7%) and Bacteroides dorei 5_1_36/D4 (11.5%).

    Techniques: Sequencing

    Analyses of a paired metagenomic and metatranscriptomic datasets of a human stool sample by MetaPA. ( A ) Display of sequencing coverages (the left panel) and recall rates (the right panel) for the top 19 abundant species in the metagenomic dataset. ( B ) Sequencing coverage (the left panel) and recall rates (the right panel) for genes with different expression levels in the metatranscriptomic dataset. Protein sequences assembled by MetaPA with completeness of 30% or higher are taken into account.

    Journal: Nucleic Acids Research

    Article Title: Amino acid based de Bruijn graph algorithm for identifying complete coding genes from metagenomic and metatranscriptomic short reads

    doi: 10.1093/nar/gkz017

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Analyses of a paired metagenomic and metatranscriptomic datasets of a human stool sample by MetaPA. ( A ) Display of sequencing coverages (the left panel) and recall rates (the right panel) for the top 19 abundant species in the metagenomic dataset. ( B ) Sequencing coverage (the left panel) and recall rates (the right panel) for genes with different expression levels in the metatranscriptomic dataset. Protein sequences assembled by MetaPA with completeness of 30% or higher are taken into account.

    Article Snippet: Consistently, the majority of assembled proteins (20 475, 68.9%) accounting for 80.3% of assembled reads, came from the 19 species detected in the metagenomic data, exhibiting similar abundance variation pattern as reported by Giannoukos et al. : Prevotella copri DSM 18205, as the most transcriptionally active species, occupied 53.9% of total assembled reads, followed by Bacteroides vulgatus ATCC 8482 (11.7%) and Bacteroides dorei 5_1_36/D4 (11.5%).

    Techniques: Sequencing, Expressing

    Maximum lesion size of mice challenged with either  P. gingivalis  ATCC 33277 (A) or W50 (B). BALB/c mice were immunized s.c. with the RgpA-Kgp proteinase complex (50 μg), formalin-killed (FK)  P. gingivalis  cells (2 × 10 8  of either strain ATCC 33277 or strain W50), formalin-killed  E. coli  cells (2 × 10 8 ), or PBS administered in IFA for both the primary and secondary doses. All mice were challenged 12 days after the secondary immunization with either  P. gingivalis  strain ATCC 33277 (7.5 × 10 9  viable cells) or W50 (3 × 10 9  viable cells) and were weighed, and the lesion sizes were measured daily over 14 days. Lesion sizes were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney U-Wilcoxon rank sum test. ∗, Groups significantly different ( P

    Journal: Infection and Immunity

    Article Title: RgpA-Kgp Peptide-Based Immunogens Provide Protection against Porphyromonas gingivalis Challenge in a Murine Lesion Model

    doi:

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Maximum lesion size of mice challenged with either P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 (A) or W50 (B). BALB/c mice were immunized s.c. with the RgpA-Kgp proteinase complex (50 μg), formalin-killed (FK) P. gingivalis cells (2 × 10 8 of either strain ATCC 33277 or strain W50), formalin-killed E. coli cells (2 × 10 8 ), or PBS administered in IFA for both the primary and secondary doses. All mice were challenged 12 days after the secondary immunization with either P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 (7.5 × 10 9 viable cells) or W50 (3 × 10 9 viable cells) and were weighed, and the lesion sizes were measured daily over 14 days. Lesion sizes were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney U-Wilcoxon rank sum test. ∗, Groups significantly different ( P

    Article Snippet: All of the mice immunized with adjuvant or formalin-killed E. coli cells developed lesions (reaching a maximum size by day 3 that receded over the next 11 days) when challenged with either P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 (Fig. A) or W50 (Fig. B), respectively.

    Techniques: Mouse Assay, Immunofluorescence, MANN-WHITNEY