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Carl Zeiss conventional light sheet microscope
The 3D tissue imaging ability evaluation and comparison with a <t>conventional</t> <t>light</t> <t>sheet</t> <t>microscope.</t> (a-c) Lateral and axial maximum intensity projections (MIP) of a cleared Thy1-YFP mouse brain imaged with the presented microscope. (d-f) Lateral and (g-i) axial MIPs of a selected volume (white) in (a) and (b), imaged with a Zeiss Z1 light sheet microscope, a six-tile mode and a non-tile mode of the presented tiling light sheet microscope. (j-l) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (g-i). (m-o) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (j-l). (p,q) 3D renderings of two ~2×2×5 mm 3 subvolumes (yellow and magenta) in (a) imaged with a six-tile mode of the microscope. (r-u) Lateral and axial MIPs of the selected volumes in (p) and (q). (v,w) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (r) and (t). (x,y) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (s) and (u). The size of all inserts in (m-o) is 50×50 μm 2 . Scale bars, 1 mm (b-d), 200 μm (d,g), 50 μm (j,m), 100 μm (r-w), and 10 μm (x,y).
Conventional Light Sheet Microscope, supplied by Carl Zeiss, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 99/100, based on 2 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
https://www.bioz.com/result/conventional light sheet microscope/product/Carl Zeiss
Average 99 stars, based on 2 article reviews
Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
conventional light sheet microscope - by Bioz Stars, 2022-09
99/100 stars

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1) Product Images from "A versatile tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissues imaging"

Article Title: A versatile tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissues imaging

Journal: bioRxiv

doi: 10.1101/829267

The 3D tissue imaging ability evaluation and comparison with a conventional light sheet microscope. (a-c) Lateral and axial maximum intensity projections (MIP) of a cleared Thy1-YFP mouse brain imaged with the presented microscope. (d-f) Lateral and (g-i) axial MIPs of a selected volume (white) in (a) and (b), imaged with a Zeiss Z1 light sheet microscope, a six-tile mode and a non-tile mode of the presented tiling light sheet microscope. (j-l) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (g-i). (m-o) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (j-l). (p,q) 3D renderings of two ~2×2×5 mm 3 subvolumes (yellow and magenta) in (a) imaged with a six-tile mode of the microscope. (r-u) Lateral and axial MIPs of the selected volumes in (p) and (q). (v,w) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (r) and (t). (x,y) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (s) and (u). The size of all inserts in (m-o) is 50×50 μm 2 . Scale bars, 1 mm (b-d), 200 μm (d,g), 50 μm (j,m), 100 μm (r-w), and 10 μm (x,y).
Figure Legend Snippet: The 3D tissue imaging ability evaluation and comparison with a conventional light sheet microscope. (a-c) Lateral and axial maximum intensity projections (MIP) of a cleared Thy1-YFP mouse brain imaged with the presented microscope. (d-f) Lateral and (g-i) axial MIPs of a selected volume (white) in (a) and (b), imaged with a Zeiss Z1 light sheet microscope, a six-tile mode and a non-tile mode of the presented tiling light sheet microscope. (j-l) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (g-i). (m-o) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (j-l). (p,q) 3D renderings of two ~2×2×5 mm 3 subvolumes (yellow and magenta) in (a) imaged with a six-tile mode of the microscope. (r-u) Lateral and axial MIPs of the selected volumes in (p) and (q). (v,w) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (r) and (t). (x,y) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (s) and (u). The size of all inserts in (m-o) is 50×50 μm 2 . Scale bars, 1 mm (b-d), 200 μm (d,g), 50 μm (j,m), 100 μm (r-w), and 10 μm (x,y).

Techniques Used: Imaging, Microscopy

The tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissue imaging. (a,b) Either the spatial resolution or the imaging speed is decreased when a large sample is imaged with conventional LSM. (c) Both the high spatial resolution and the high imaging speed are maintained by using tiling light sheets. (d) Both the size of the FOV and the excitation tiling light sheet can be adjusted based on the desired the spatial resolution and imaging speed. (e,f) The schematic diagram and configuration of the tiling light sheet microscope. (g) The generation of binary phase maps used to modulate the illumination light. Tilt 1 phase is used to control the excitation laser beam intensity profile. Tile 2 phase is adjusted to keep the excitation light sheet in focus within the FOV. Defocus phase is used to tile the excitation light sheet and to correct the light sheet lateral drifting caused by RI variation of the imaging buffer. All phase components are superimposed and binarized before being shifted to correct the tilt of the excitation beam.
Figure Legend Snippet: The tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissue imaging. (a,b) Either the spatial resolution or the imaging speed is decreased when a large sample is imaged with conventional LSM. (c) Both the high spatial resolution and the high imaging speed are maintained by using tiling light sheets. (d) Both the size of the FOV and the excitation tiling light sheet can be adjusted based on the desired the spatial resolution and imaging speed. (e,f) The schematic diagram and configuration of the tiling light sheet microscope. (g) The generation of binary phase maps used to modulate the illumination light. Tilt 1 phase is used to control the excitation laser beam intensity profile. Tile 2 phase is adjusted to keep the excitation light sheet in focus within the FOV. Defocus phase is used to tile the excitation light sheet and to correct the light sheet lateral drifting caused by RI variation of the imaging buffer. All phase components are superimposed and binarized before being shifted to correct the tilt of the excitation beam.

Techniques Used: Microscopy, Imaging

2) Product Images from "A versatile tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissues imaging"

Article Title: A versatile tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissues imaging

Journal: bioRxiv

doi: 10.1101/829267

The 3D tissue imaging ability evaluation and comparison with a conventional light sheet microscope. (a-c) Lateral and axial maximum intensity projections (MIP) of a cleared Thy1-YFP mouse brain imaged with the presented microscope. (d-f) Lateral and (g-i) axial MIPs of a selected volume (white) in (a) and (b), imaged with a Zeiss Z1 light sheet microscope, a six-tile mode and a non-tile mode of the presented tiling light sheet microscope. (j-l) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (g-i). (m-o) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (j-l). (p,q) 3D renderings of two ~2×2×5 mm 3 subvolumes (yellow and magenta) in (a) imaged with a six-tile mode of the microscope. (r-u) Lateral and axial MIPs of the selected volumes in (p) and (q). (v,w) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (r) and (t). (x,y) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (s) and (u). The size of all inserts in (m-o) is 50×50 μm 2 . Scale bars, 1 mm (b-d), 200 μm (d,g), 50 μm (j,m), 100 μm (r-w), and 10 μm (x,y).
Figure Legend Snippet: The 3D tissue imaging ability evaluation and comparison with a conventional light sheet microscope. (a-c) Lateral and axial maximum intensity projections (MIP) of a cleared Thy1-YFP mouse brain imaged with the presented microscope. (d-f) Lateral and (g-i) axial MIPs of a selected volume (white) in (a) and (b), imaged with a Zeiss Z1 light sheet microscope, a six-tile mode and a non-tile mode of the presented tiling light sheet microscope. (j-l) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (g-i). (m-o) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (j-l). (p,q) 3D renderings of two ~2×2×5 mm 3 subvolumes (yellow and magenta) in (a) imaged with a six-tile mode of the microscope. (r-u) Lateral and axial MIPs of the selected volumes in (p) and (q). (v,w) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (r) and (t). (x,y) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (s) and (u). The size of all inserts in (m-o) is 50×50 μm 2 . Scale bars, 1 mm (b-d), 200 μm (d,g), 50 μm (j,m), 100 μm (r-w), and 10 μm (x,y).

Techniques Used: Imaging, Microscopy

The tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissue imaging. (a,b) Either the spatial resolution or the imaging speed is decreased when a large sample is imaged with conventional LSM. (c) Both the high spatial resolution and the high imaging speed are maintained by using tiling light sheets. (d) Both the size of the FOV and the excitation tiling light sheet can be adjusted based on the desired the spatial resolution and imaging speed. (e,f) The schematic diagram and configuration of the tiling light sheet microscope. (g) The generation of binary phase maps used to modulate the illumination light. Tilt 1 phase is used to control the excitation laser beam intensity profile. Tile 2 phase is adjusted to keep the excitation light sheet in focus within the FOV. Defocus phase is used to tile the excitation light sheet and to correct the light sheet lateral drifting caused by RI variation of the imaging buffer. All phase components are superimposed and binarized before being shifted to correct the tilt of the excitation beam.
Figure Legend Snippet: The tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissue imaging. (a,b) Either the spatial resolution or the imaging speed is decreased when a large sample is imaged with conventional LSM. (c) Both the high spatial resolution and the high imaging speed are maintained by using tiling light sheets. (d) Both the size of the FOV and the excitation tiling light sheet can be adjusted based on the desired the spatial resolution and imaging speed. (e,f) The schematic diagram and configuration of the tiling light sheet microscope. (g) The generation of binary phase maps used to modulate the illumination light. Tilt 1 phase is used to control the excitation laser beam intensity profile. Tile 2 phase is adjusted to keep the excitation light sheet in focus within the FOV. Defocus phase is used to tile the excitation light sheet and to correct the light sheet lateral drifting caused by RI variation of the imaging buffer. All phase components are superimposed and binarized before being shifted to correct the tilt of the excitation beam.

Techniques Used: Microscopy, Imaging

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    Carl Zeiss conventional light sheet microscope
    The 3D tissue imaging ability evaluation and comparison with a <t>conventional</t> <t>light</t> <t>sheet</t> <t>microscope.</t> (a-c) Lateral and axial maximum intensity projections (MIP) of a cleared Thy1-YFP mouse brain imaged with the presented microscope. (d-f) Lateral and (g-i) axial MIPs of a selected volume (white) in (a) and (b), imaged with a Zeiss Z1 light sheet microscope, a six-tile mode and a non-tile mode of the presented tiling light sheet microscope. (j-l) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (g-i). (m-o) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (j-l). (p,q) 3D renderings of two ~2×2×5 mm 3 subvolumes (yellow and magenta) in (a) imaged with a six-tile mode of the microscope. (r-u) Lateral and axial MIPs of the selected volumes in (p) and (q). (v,w) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (r) and (t). (x,y) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (s) and (u). The size of all inserts in (m-o) is 50×50 μm 2 . Scale bars, 1 mm (b-d), 200 μm (d,g), 50 μm (j,m), 100 μm (r-w), and 10 μm (x,y).
    Conventional Light Sheet Microscope, supplied by Carl Zeiss, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 99/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/conventional light sheet microscope/product/Carl Zeiss
    Average 99 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    conventional light sheet microscope - by Bioz Stars, 2022-09
    99/100 stars
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    The 3D tissue imaging ability evaluation and comparison with a conventional light sheet microscope. (a-c) Lateral and axial maximum intensity projections (MIP) of a cleared Thy1-YFP mouse brain imaged with the presented microscope. (d-f) Lateral and (g-i) axial MIPs of a selected volume (white) in (a) and (b), imaged with a Zeiss Z1 light sheet microscope, a six-tile mode and a non-tile mode of the presented tiling light sheet microscope. (j-l) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (g-i). (m-o) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (j-l). (p,q) 3D renderings of two ~2×2×5 mm 3 subvolumes (yellow and magenta) in (a) imaged with a six-tile mode of the microscope. (r-u) Lateral and axial MIPs of the selected volumes in (p) and (q). (v,w) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (r) and (t). (x,y) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (s) and (u). The size of all inserts in (m-o) is 50×50 μm 2 . Scale bars, 1 mm (b-d), 200 μm (d,g), 50 μm (j,m), 100 μm (r-w), and 10 μm (x,y).

    Journal: bioRxiv

    Article Title: A versatile tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissues imaging

    doi: 10.1101/829267

    Figure Lengend Snippet: The 3D tissue imaging ability evaluation and comparison with a conventional light sheet microscope. (a-c) Lateral and axial maximum intensity projections (MIP) of a cleared Thy1-YFP mouse brain imaged with the presented microscope. (d-f) Lateral and (g-i) axial MIPs of a selected volume (white) in (a) and (b), imaged with a Zeiss Z1 light sheet microscope, a six-tile mode and a non-tile mode of the presented tiling light sheet microscope. (j-l) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (g-i). (m-o) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (j-l). (p,q) 3D renderings of two ~2×2×5 mm 3 subvolumes (yellow and magenta) in (a) imaged with a six-tile mode of the microscope. (r-u) Lateral and axial MIPs of the selected volumes in (p) and (q). (v,w) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (r) and (t). (x,y) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (s) and (u). The size of all inserts in (m-o) is 50×50 μm 2 . Scale bars, 1 mm (b-d), 200 μm (d,g), 50 μm (j,m), 100 μm (r-w), and 10 μm (x,y).

    Article Snippet: A conventional light sheet microscope (Zeiss Z1) equipped with a 0.16 NA air objective was first used to image the sample at ~2×2×15 μm3 spatial resolution in ~1.5 hours.

    Techniques: Imaging, Microscopy

    The tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissue imaging. (a,b) Either the spatial resolution or the imaging speed is decreased when a large sample is imaged with conventional LSM. (c) Both the high spatial resolution and the high imaging speed are maintained by using tiling light sheets. (d) Both the size of the FOV and the excitation tiling light sheet can be adjusted based on the desired the spatial resolution and imaging speed. (e,f) The schematic diagram and configuration of the tiling light sheet microscope. (g) The generation of binary phase maps used to modulate the illumination light. Tilt 1 phase is used to control the excitation laser beam intensity profile. Tile 2 phase is adjusted to keep the excitation light sheet in focus within the FOV. Defocus phase is used to tile the excitation light sheet and to correct the light sheet lateral drifting caused by RI variation of the imaging buffer. All phase components are superimposed and binarized before being shifted to correct the tilt of the excitation beam.

    Journal: bioRxiv

    Article Title: A versatile tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissues imaging

    doi: 10.1101/829267

    Figure Lengend Snippet: The tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissue imaging. (a,b) Either the spatial resolution or the imaging speed is decreased when a large sample is imaged with conventional LSM. (c) Both the high spatial resolution and the high imaging speed are maintained by using tiling light sheets. (d) Both the size of the FOV and the excitation tiling light sheet can be adjusted based on the desired the spatial resolution and imaging speed. (e,f) The schematic diagram and configuration of the tiling light sheet microscope. (g) The generation of binary phase maps used to modulate the illumination light. Tilt 1 phase is used to control the excitation laser beam intensity profile. Tile 2 phase is adjusted to keep the excitation light sheet in focus within the FOV. Defocus phase is used to tile the excitation light sheet and to correct the light sheet lateral drifting caused by RI variation of the imaging buffer. All phase components are superimposed and binarized before being shifted to correct the tilt of the excitation beam.

    Article Snippet: A conventional light sheet microscope (Zeiss Z1) equipped with a 0.16 NA air objective was first used to image the sample at ~2×2×15 μm3 spatial resolution in ~1.5 hours.

    Techniques: Microscopy, Imaging

    The 3D tissue imaging ability evaluation and comparison with a conventional light sheet microscope. (a-c) Lateral and axial maximum intensity projections (MIP) of a cleared Thy1-YFP mouse brain imaged with the presented microscope. (d-f) Lateral and (g-i) axial MIPs of a selected volume (white) in (a) and (b), imaged with a Zeiss Z1 light sheet microscope, a six-tile mode and a non-tile mode of the presented tiling light sheet microscope. (j-l) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (g-i). (m-o) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (j-l). (p,q) 3D renderings of two ~2×2×5 mm 3 subvolumes (yellow and magenta) in (a) imaged with a six-tile mode of the microscope. (r-u) Lateral and axial MIPs of the selected volumes in (p) and (q). (v,w) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (r) and (t). (x,y) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (s) and (u). The size of all inserts in (m-o) is 50×50 μm 2 . Scale bars, 1 mm (b-d), 200 μm (d,g), 50 μm (j,m), 100 μm (r-w), and 10 μm (x,y).

    Journal: bioRxiv

    Article Title: A versatile tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissues imaging

    doi: 10.1101/829267

    Figure Lengend Snippet: The 3D tissue imaging ability evaluation and comparison with a conventional light sheet microscope. (a-c) Lateral and axial maximum intensity projections (MIP) of a cleared Thy1-YFP mouse brain imaged with the presented microscope. (d-f) Lateral and (g-i) axial MIPs of a selected volume (white) in (a) and (b), imaged with a Zeiss Z1 light sheet microscope, a six-tile mode and a non-tile mode of the presented tiling light sheet microscope. (j-l) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (g-i). (m-o) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (j-l). (p,q) 3D renderings of two ~2×2×5 mm 3 subvolumes (yellow and magenta) in (a) imaged with a six-tile mode of the microscope. (r-u) Lateral and axial MIPs of the selected volumes in (p) and (q). (v,w) Axial slices through the indicated planes in (r) and (t). (x,y) Zoom in views of the selected areas in (s) and (u). The size of all inserts in (m-o) is 50×50 μm 2 . Scale bars, 1 mm (b-d), 200 μm (d,g), 50 μm (j,m), 100 μm (r-w), and 10 μm (x,y).

    Article Snippet: A conventional light sheet microscope (Zeiss Z1) equipped with a 0.16 NA air objective was first used to image the sample at ~2×2×15 μm3 spatial resolution in ~1.5 hours.

    Techniques: Imaging, Microscopy

    The tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissue imaging. (a,b) Either the spatial resolution or the imaging speed is decreased when a large sample is imaged with conventional LSM. (c) Both the high spatial resolution and the high imaging speed are maintained by using tiling light sheets. (d) Both the size of the FOV and the excitation tiling light sheet can be adjusted based on the desired the spatial resolution and imaging speed. (e,f) The schematic diagram and configuration of the tiling light sheet microscope. (g) The generation of binary phase maps used to modulate the illumination light. Tilt 1 phase is used to control the excitation laser beam intensity profile. Tile 2 phase is adjusted to keep the excitation light sheet in focus within the FOV. Defocus phase is used to tile the excitation light sheet and to correct the light sheet lateral drifting caused by RI variation of the imaging buffer. All phase components are superimposed and binarized before being shifted to correct the tilt of the excitation beam.

    Journal: bioRxiv

    Article Title: A versatile tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissues imaging

    doi: 10.1101/829267

    Figure Lengend Snippet: The tiling light sheet microscope for cleared tissue imaging. (a,b) Either the spatial resolution or the imaging speed is decreased when a large sample is imaged with conventional LSM. (c) Both the high spatial resolution and the high imaging speed are maintained by using tiling light sheets. (d) Both the size of the FOV and the excitation tiling light sheet can be adjusted based on the desired the spatial resolution and imaging speed. (e,f) The schematic diagram and configuration of the tiling light sheet microscope. (g) The generation of binary phase maps used to modulate the illumination light. Tilt 1 phase is used to control the excitation laser beam intensity profile. Tile 2 phase is adjusted to keep the excitation light sheet in focus within the FOV. Defocus phase is used to tile the excitation light sheet and to correct the light sheet lateral drifting caused by RI variation of the imaging buffer. All phase components are superimposed and binarized before being shifted to correct the tilt of the excitation beam.

    Article Snippet: A conventional light sheet microscope (Zeiss Z1) equipped with a 0.16 NA air objective was first used to image the sample at ~2×2×15 μm3 spatial resolution in ~1.5 hours.

    Techniques: Microscopy, Imaging