gasseri  (ATCC)


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    Structured Review

    ATCC gasseri
    rep-PCR DNA fingerprints generated from Lactobacillus ATCC strains and vaginal isolates. The vaginal isolates were previously identified to the species level by using whole-chromosome probes produced from Lactobacillus ATCC strains. Each gel is representative of isolates having DNA homology to one Lactobacillus species. Clinical isolates within a group of Lactobacillus species were from different women. L . crispatus , L . jensenii , Lactobacillus sp. strain 1086V, and L . <t>gasseri</t> were chosen because of their vaginal prevalence. Lane 1 of each gel contains the 1-kb DNA size ladder. (A) Isolates homologous to the whole-chromosome probe of L . crispatus ATCC 33197. L . crispatus CTV-05 and ATCC 33197 are shown in lanes 2 and 3, respectively. Lanes 4 to 11 show the rep-PCR patterns for L . crispatus isolates from eight women. (B) Isolates homologous to the whole-chromosome probe of L . jensenii ATCC 25258. ATCC 25258 was run in lane 2. Lanes 3 to 12 show the rep-PCR patterns for 10 L . jensenii isolates, all from different women. (C) Isolates homologous to the Lactobacillus sp. strain 1086V whole-chromosome probe. The original Lactobacillus sp. strain 1086V is shown in lane 2. Lanes 3 to 12 show the rep-PCR patterns for Lactobacillus sp. strain 1086V-like isolates from nine women. (D) Isolates homologous to the whole-chromosome probe of L . gasseri ATCC 4963. L . gasseri ATCC 4963 and 9857 are shown in lanes 2 and 3, respectively. The rep-PCR DNA patterns for L . gasseri isolates from eight women are shown in lanes 4 to 11.
    Gasseri, supplied by ATCC, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 93/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
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    1) Product Images from "DNA Fingerprinting of Lactobacilluscrispatus Strain CTV-05 by Repetitive Element Sequence-Based PCR Analysis in a Pilot Study of Vaginal Colonization"

    Article Title: DNA Fingerprinting of Lactobacilluscrispatus Strain CTV-05 by Repetitive Element Sequence-Based PCR Analysis in a Pilot Study of Vaginal Colonization

    Journal: Journal of Clinical Microbiology

    doi: 10.1128/JCM.41.5.1881-1887.2003

    rep-PCR DNA fingerprints generated from Lactobacillus ATCC strains and vaginal isolates. The vaginal isolates were previously identified to the species level by using whole-chromosome probes produced from Lactobacillus ATCC strains. Each gel is representative of isolates having DNA homology to one Lactobacillus species. Clinical isolates within a group of Lactobacillus species were from different women. L . crispatus , L . jensenii , Lactobacillus sp. strain 1086V, and L . gasseri were chosen because of their vaginal prevalence. Lane 1 of each gel contains the 1-kb DNA size ladder. (A) Isolates homologous to the whole-chromosome probe of L . crispatus ATCC 33197. L . crispatus CTV-05 and ATCC 33197 are shown in lanes 2 and 3, respectively. Lanes 4 to 11 show the rep-PCR patterns for L . crispatus isolates from eight women. (B) Isolates homologous to the whole-chromosome probe of L . jensenii ATCC 25258. ATCC 25258 was run in lane 2. Lanes 3 to 12 show the rep-PCR patterns for 10 L . jensenii isolates, all from different women. (C) Isolates homologous to the Lactobacillus sp. strain 1086V whole-chromosome probe. The original Lactobacillus sp. strain 1086V is shown in lane 2. Lanes 3 to 12 show the rep-PCR patterns for Lactobacillus sp. strain 1086V-like isolates from nine women. (D) Isolates homologous to the whole-chromosome probe of L . gasseri ATCC 4963. L . gasseri ATCC 4963 and 9857 are shown in lanes 2 and 3, respectively. The rep-PCR DNA patterns for L . gasseri isolates from eight women are shown in lanes 4 to 11.
    Figure Legend Snippet: rep-PCR DNA fingerprints generated from Lactobacillus ATCC strains and vaginal isolates. The vaginal isolates were previously identified to the species level by using whole-chromosome probes produced from Lactobacillus ATCC strains. Each gel is representative of isolates having DNA homology to one Lactobacillus species. Clinical isolates within a group of Lactobacillus species were from different women. L . crispatus , L . jensenii , Lactobacillus sp. strain 1086V, and L . gasseri were chosen because of their vaginal prevalence. Lane 1 of each gel contains the 1-kb DNA size ladder. (A) Isolates homologous to the whole-chromosome probe of L . crispatus ATCC 33197. L . crispatus CTV-05 and ATCC 33197 are shown in lanes 2 and 3, respectively. Lanes 4 to 11 show the rep-PCR patterns for L . crispatus isolates from eight women. (B) Isolates homologous to the whole-chromosome probe of L . jensenii ATCC 25258. ATCC 25258 was run in lane 2. Lanes 3 to 12 show the rep-PCR patterns for 10 L . jensenii isolates, all from different women. (C) Isolates homologous to the Lactobacillus sp. strain 1086V whole-chromosome probe. The original Lactobacillus sp. strain 1086V is shown in lane 2. Lanes 3 to 12 show the rep-PCR patterns for Lactobacillus sp. strain 1086V-like isolates from nine women. (D) Isolates homologous to the whole-chromosome probe of L . gasseri ATCC 4963. L . gasseri ATCC 4963 and 9857 are shown in lanes 2 and 3, respectively. The rep-PCR DNA patterns for L . gasseri isolates from eight women are shown in lanes 4 to 11.

    Techniques Used: Polymerase Chain Reaction, Generated, Produced

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    ATCC l gasseri
    Stability of CamSA and taurocholate towards bile salt hydrolases. CamSA (white bar) and taurocholate (black bars) were incubated with cultures of B. longum or L <t>gasseri</t> . Percent conjugated bile salts were derived by dividing the intensity of TLC spots obtained at different times by the intensity of the TLC spot obtained at the beginning of incubation (time 0). Time 0 was set at 100% and is not shown for clarity. Standard deviations represent at least five independent measures.
    L Gasseri, supplied by ATCC, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 93/100, based on 3 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
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    Stability of CamSA and taurocholate towards bile salt hydrolases. CamSA (white bar) and taurocholate (black bars) were incubated with cultures of B. longum or L gasseri . Percent conjugated bile salts were derived by dividing the intensity of TLC spots obtained at different times by the intensity of the TLC spot obtained at the beginning of incubation (time 0). Time 0 was set at 100% and is not shown for clarity. Standard deviations represent at least five independent measures.

    Journal: PLoS ONE

    Article Title: Fate of Ingested Clostridium difficile Spores in Mice

    doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0072620

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Stability of CamSA and taurocholate towards bile salt hydrolases. CamSA (white bar) and taurocholate (black bars) were incubated with cultures of B. longum or L gasseri . Percent conjugated bile salts were derived by dividing the intensity of TLC spots obtained at different times by the intensity of the TLC spot obtained at the beginning of incubation (time 0). Time 0 was set at 100% and is not shown for clarity. Standard deviations represent at least five independent measures.

    Article Snippet: Effect of CamSA on Bacterial Growth Laboratory strains of E. coli DH5α , B. longum , L. gasseri , and C. difficile were individually inoculated from freezer stock onto appropriate agar medium as directed by ATCC.

    Techniques: Incubation, Derivative Assay, Thin Layer Chromatography

    Surface molecules of L. gasseri ATCC 9857 contribute to inhibition of T. vaginalis B7RC2 adhesion to hVECs. These adhesion assays were done under the protection mode, where bacteria or protein extracts were added to hVECs prior to addition of the parasites. (Top) Surface proteins of L. gasseri contribute to inhibition of parasite cytoadherence. Prior to the adhesion assays, lactobacilli were subjected to chemical and/or enzymatic treatments either to prepare protoplasts or to remove surface-associated molecules (see Materials and Methods). As indicated in the figure, samples were either protoplasts or lactobacilli treated with increasing concentrations of LiCl, proteinase K, or a combination of both. Mock-treated lactobacilli were used as controls (see Materials and Methods). The inhibition of T. vaginalis adhesion to hVECs in the presence of mock-treated lactobacilli was considered 100% (dashed line). On the other hand, the inhibition of T. vaginalis adhesion to hVECs in the presence of treated lactobacilli was compared to that of their controls, and the relative inhibitory level was expressed as a percent change. All treatments caused a decrease in inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. For each type of treatment, the decrease in the relative inhibitory level was statistically significant compared to the result for the respective control ( P

    Journal: Infection and Immunity

    Article Title: A Cell Surface Aggregation-Promoting Factor from Lactobacillus gasseri Contributes to Inhibition of Trichomonas vaginalis Adhesion to Human Vaginal Ectocervical Cells

    doi: 10.1128/IAI.00907-17

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Surface molecules of L. gasseri ATCC 9857 contribute to inhibition of T. vaginalis B7RC2 adhesion to hVECs. These adhesion assays were done under the protection mode, where bacteria or protein extracts were added to hVECs prior to addition of the parasites. (Top) Surface proteins of L. gasseri contribute to inhibition of parasite cytoadherence. Prior to the adhesion assays, lactobacilli were subjected to chemical and/or enzymatic treatments either to prepare protoplasts or to remove surface-associated molecules (see Materials and Methods). As indicated in the figure, samples were either protoplasts or lactobacilli treated with increasing concentrations of LiCl, proteinase K, or a combination of both. Mock-treated lactobacilli were used as controls (see Materials and Methods). The inhibition of T. vaginalis adhesion to hVECs in the presence of mock-treated lactobacilli was considered 100% (dashed line). On the other hand, the inhibition of T. vaginalis adhesion to hVECs in the presence of treated lactobacilli was compared to that of their controls, and the relative inhibitory level was expressed as a percent change. All treatments caused a decrease in inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. For each type of treatment, the decrease in the relative inhibitory level was statistically significant compared to the result for the respective control ( P

    Article Snippet: Because L. gasseri is a dominant species of the human vaginal microbiota , we further examined here the inhibitory properties of L. gasseri strains ATCC 9857 and ATCC 33323, originally isolated from human vagina and intestine, respectively ( , ), against host cytoadherence of T. vaginalis B7RC2 ( ).

    Techniques: Inhibition

    L. gasseri ATCC 9857 is highly inhibitory toward T. vaginalis B7RC2 adhesion to hVECs. In this assay, lactobacilli were preincubated with hVECs, followed by addition of CMTMR-stained T. vaginalis . As a control, hVECs and stained T. vaginalis cells were incubated without bacteria. At the end of the incubation, unbound parasites were removed and bound parasites only were collected after trypsinization and counted by flow cytometry (see Materials and Methods). The number of hVEC-bound T. vaginalis cells in the presence of L. gasseri strain ATCC 9857 or ATCC 33323 (originally isolated from the human vagina and intestine, respectively) was compared to that for the control in order to determine the percent inhibition of T. vaginalis adhesion to hVECs. (A) Flow cytometry data depicting the separation of CMTMR-stained, hVEC-bound T. vaginalis (FL-2 channel) from a mixed population of unstained lactobacilli and/or hVECs. (B) Percent inhibition of T. vaginalis adhesion to hVECs by the two Lactobacillus strains. The differences between both samples and the control were statistically significant ( P

    Journal: Infection and Immunity

    Article Title: A Cell Surface Aggregation-Promoting Factor from Lactobacillus gasseri Contributes to Inhibition of Trichomonas vaginalis Adhesion to Human Vaginal Ectocervical Cells

    doi: 10.1128/IAI.00907-17

    Figure Lengend Snippet: L. gasseri ATCC 9857 is highly inhibitory toward T. vaginalis B7RC2 adhesion to hVECs. In this assay, lactobacilli were preincubated with hVECs, followed by addition of CMTMR-stained T. vaginalis . As a control, hVECs and stained T. vaginalis cells were incubated without bacteria. At the end of the incubation, unbound parasites were removed and bound parasites only were collected after trypsinization and counted by flow cytometry (see Materials and Methods). The number of hVEC-bound T. vaginalis cells in the presence of L. gasseri strain ATCC 9857 or ATCC 33323 (originally isolated from the human vagina and intestine, respectively) was compared to that for the control in order to determine the percent inhibition of T. vaginalis adhesion to hVECs. (A) Flow cytometry data depicting the separation of CMTMR-stained, hVEC-bound T. vaginalis (FL-2 channel) from a mixed population of unstained lactobacilli and/or hVECs. (B) Percent inhibition of T. vaginalis adhesion to hVECs by the two Lactobacillus strains. The differences between both samples and the control were statistically significant ( P

    Article Snippet: Because L. gasseri is a dominant species of the human vaginal microbiota , we further examined here the inhibitory properties of L. gasseri strains ATCC 9857 and ATCC 33323, originally isolated from human vagina and intestine, respectively ( , ), against host cytoadherence of T. vaginalis B7RC2 ( ).

    Techniques: Staining, Incubation, Flow Cytometry, Cytometry, Isolation, Inhibition

    Expression of L. gasseri APF-2 on the surface of L. lactis enhances inhibition of T. vaginalis B7RC2 adhesion to hVECs. (Inset) Heterologous expression of APF-2 of L. gasseri ATCC 9857 on the cell wall of L. lactis , as detected by Western blotting. A discrete band of the expected size (∼32 kDa) was seen in the cell wall extracts derived from nisin-induced apf-2 -transformed L. lactis (Lac/apf-2) but not from nontransformed L. lactis (Lac). Expression of APF-2 from L. lactis apf-2 was also detected in the absence of nisin (leaky expression) and increased from 0 to 1 ng/ml of nisin. Adhesion of T. vaginalis to hVECs was done in the presence of nontransformed L. lactis (white bars) and apf 2-transformed L. lactis (black bars) either induced or not induced with nisin. The fold changes in the inhibition of T. vaginalis adhesion were measured between cells and protoplasts for nontransformed L. lactis and for apf 2-transformed L. lactis . Significant fold changes between cells and protoplasts were seen only for apf 2-transformed L. lactis . Expression of APF-2 on the surface of L. lactis promotes inhibition of T. vaginalis adhesion to hVECs, which was more pronounced upon nisin induction at 1 ng/ml ( P

    Journal: Infection and Immunity

    Article Title: A Cell Surface Aggregation-Promoting Factor from Lactobacillus gasseri Contributes to Inhibition of Trichomonas vaginalis Adhesion to Human Vaginal Ectocervical Cells

    doi: 10.1128/IAI.00907-17

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Expression of L. gasseri APF-2 on the surface of L. lactis enhances inhibition of T. vaginalis B7RC2 adhesion to hVECs. (Inset) Heterologous expression of APF-2 of L. gasseri ATCC 9857 on the cell wall of L. lactis , as detected by Western blotting. A discrete band of the expected size (∼32 kDa) was seen in the cell wall extracts derived from nisin-induced apf-2 -transformed L. lactis (Lac/apf-2) but not from nontransformed L. lactis (Lac). Expression of APF-2 from L. lactis apf-2 was also detected in the absence of nisin (leaky expression) and increased from 0 to 1 ng/ml of nisin. Adhesion of T. vaginalis to hVECs was done in the presence of nontransformed L. lactis (white bars) and apf 2-transformed L. lactis (black bars) either induced or not induced with nisin. The fold changes in the inhibition of T. vaginalis adhesion were measured between cells and protoplasts for nontransformed L. lactis and for apf 2-transformed L. lactis . Significant fold changes between cells and protoplasts were seen only for apf 2-transformed L. lactis . Expression of APF-2 on the surface of L. lactis promotes inhibition of T. vaginalis adhesion to hVECs, which was more pronounced upon nisin induction at 1 ng/ml ( P

    Article Snippet: Because L. gasseri is a dominant species of the human vaginal microbiota , we further examined here the inhibitory properties of L. gasseri strains ATCC 9857 and ATCC 33323, originally isolated from human vagina and intestine, respectively ( , ), against host cytoadherence of T. vaginalis B7RC2 ( ).

    Techniques: Expressing, Inhibition, Western Blot, Derivative Assay, Transformation Assay

    L. gasseri inhibits T. vaginalis B7RC2 adhesion to hVECs in different ways. (A) Inhibition is achieved by L. gasseri ATCC 9857 cells or culture supernatant by different modes. When using bacterial cells, lactobacilli were added either before T. vaginalis was added (Protection), with T. vaginalis (Competition), or after T. vaginalis was added (Displacement). When using culture supernatant, cell-free medium recovered from lactobacilli only (Filtrate 1) or lactobacilli incubated with hVECs (Filtrate 2) was added to the adhesion assay mixtures prior to parasite addition. The results for all samples were compared to those for the controls, which consisted of hVECs incubated with T. vaginalis only (no bacteria or culture supernatant). Data are expressed as the percent inhibition of parasite adhesion to cells. The differences between all samples and their respective controls were statistically significant ( P

    Journal: Infection and Immunity

    Article Title: A Cell Surface Aggregation-Promoting Factor from Lactobacillus gasseri Contributes to Inhibition of Trichomonas vaginalis Adhesion to Human Vaginal Ectocervical Cells

    doi: 10.1128/IAI.00907-17

    Figure Lengend Snippet: L. gasseri inhibits T. vaginalis B7RC2 adhesion to hVECs in different ways. (A) Inhibition is achieved by L. gasseri ATCC 9857 cells or culture supernatant by different modes. When using bacterial cells, lactobacilli were added either before T. vaginalis was added (Protection), with T. vaginalis (Competition), or after T. vaginalis was added (Displacement). When using culture supernatant, cell-free medium recovered from lactobacilli only (Filtrate 1) or lactobacilli incubated with hVECs (Filtrate 2) was added to the adhesion assay mixtures prior to parasite addition. The results for all samples were compared to those for the controls, which consisted of hVECs incubated with T. vaginalis only (no bacteria or culture supernatant). Data are expressed as the percent inhibition of parasite adhesion to cells. The differences between all samples and their respective controls were statistically significant ( P

    Article Snippet: Because L. gasseri is a dominant species of the human vaginal microbiota , we further examined here the inhibitory properties of L. gasseri strains ATCC 9857 and ATCC 33323, originally isolated from human vagina and intestine, respectively ( , ), against host cytoadherence of T. vaginalis B7RC2 ( ).

    Techniques: Inhibition, Incubation, Cell Adhesion Assay

    Conserved domain analysis of L. gasseri ) are indicated in the figure.

    Journal: Applied and Environmental Microbiology

    Article Title: Analysis of the Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ †

    doi: 10.1128/AEM.00054-08

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Conserved domain analysis of L. gasseri ) are indicated in the figure.

    Article Snippet: In the present study, adhesion to Caco-2 by selected L. gasseri strains was investigated in order to assess strain diversity and to further characterize ATCC 33323.

    Techniques:

    BLAST result distribution across the L. gasseri ATCC 33323 ORFeome. In both figures, the x axis (horizontal axis) shows all genera with at least 150 BLAST hits throughout the ORFeome. Genera are phylogenetically sorted based on a semidynamically reparsed

    Journal: Applied and Environmental Microbiology

    Article Title: Analysis of the Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ †

    doi: 10.1128/AEM.00054-08

    Figure Lengend Snippet: BLAST result distribution across the L. gasseri ATCC 33323 ORFeome. In both figures, the x axis (horizontal axis) shows all genera with at least 150 BLAST hits throughout the ORFeome. Genera are phylogenetically sorted based on a semidynamically reparsed

    Article Snippet: In the present study, adhesion to Caco-2 by selected L. gasseri strains was investigated in order to assess strain diversity and to further characterize ATCC 33323.

    Techniques:

    PFGE patterns of L. gasseri strains. Lanes: 1 and 2, L. gasseri ATCC 33323; M, molecular weight markers; 3 and 4 L. gasseri ADH; 5 and 6, L. acidophilus NCFM; 7 and 8, L. gasseri JK12; 9 and 10, L. gasseri SD10; 11 and 12, L. gasseri ML3. The arrow indicates

    Journal: Applied and Environmental Microbiology

    Article Title: Analysis of the Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ †

    doi: 10.1128/AEM.00054-08

    Figure Lengend Snippet: PFGE patterns of L. gasseri strains. Lanes: 1 and 2, L. gasseri ATCC 33323; M, molecular weight markers; 3 and 4 L. gasseri ADH; 5 and 6, L. acidophilus NCFM; 7 and 8, L. gasseri JK12; 9 and 10, L. gasseri SD10; 11 and 12, L. gasseri ML3. The arrow indicates

    Article Snippet: In the present study, adhesion to Caco-2 by selected L. gasseri strains was investigated in order to assess strain diversity and to further characterize ATCC 33323.

    Techniques: Molecular Weight

    Genome atlas of L. gasseri ) and in-house-developed software. The right-hand legend describes the single circles in the top-down outermost-innermost direction. Outermost first ring, gapped BlastP

    Journal: Applied and Environmental Microbiology

    Article Title: Analysis of the Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ †

    doi: 10.1128/AEM.00054-08

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Genome atlas of L. gasseri ) and in-house-developed software. The right-hand legend describes the single circles in the top-down outermost-innermost direction. Outermost first ring, gapped BlastP

    Article Snippet: In the present study, adhesion to Caco-2 by selected L. gasseri strains was investigated in order to assess strain diversity and to further characterize ATCC 33323.

    Techniques: Software

    Percent reduction of the maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) of L. gasseri strains and L. acidophilus NCFM exposed to increasing concentrations of Oxgall. (A) Strains highly sensitive to bile (μ max = 0 at 0.25% Oxgall);

    Journal: Applied and Environmental Microbiology

    Article Title: Analysis of the Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ †

    doi: 10.1128/AEM.00054-08

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Percent reduction of the maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) of L. gasseri strains and L. acidophilus NCFM exposed to increasing concentrations of Oxgall. (A) Strains highly sensitive to bile (μ max = 0 at 0.25% Oxgall);

    Article Snippet: In the present study, adhesion to Caco-2 by selected L. gasseri strains was investigated in order to assess strain diversity and to further characterize ATCC 33323.

    Techniques:

    Ratio of survival of early log phase L. gasseri ATCC 33323 (░⃞) and L. acidophilus NCFM (▪) at designated concentrations of Oxgall to survival in MRS. Error bars represent the standard error of the mean for three replicates.

    Journal: Applied and Environmental Microbiology

    Article Title: Analysis of the Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ †

    doi: 10.1128/AEM.00054-08

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Ratio of survival of early log phase L. gasseri ATCC 33323 (░⃞) and L. acidophilus NCFM (▪) at designated concentrations of Oxgall to survival in MRS. Error bars represent the standard error of the mean for three replicates.

    Article Snippet: In the present study, adhesion to Caco-2 by selected L. gasseri strains was investigated in order to assess strain diversity and to further characterize ATCC 33323.

    Techniques:

    Schematic representation of the tandem prophages integrated in L. gasseri ATCC 33323. Three att sites ( attL , attB , and attR ), homologous to the Arg tRNA sequence sites, flanking and in-between the two tandem phages are shown.

    Journal: Applied and Environmental Microbiology

    Article Title: Analysis of the Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ ATCC 33323 Reveals the Molecular Basis of an Autochthonous Intestinal Organism ▿ †

    doi: 10.1128/AEM.00054-08

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Schematic representation of the tandem prophages integrated in L. gasseri ATCC 33323. Three att sites ( attL , attB , and attR ), homologous to the Arg tRNA sequence sites, flanking and in-between the two tandem phages are shown.

    Article Snippet: In the present study, adhesion to Caco-2 by selected L. gasseri strains was investigated in order to assess strain diversity and to further characterize ATCC 33323.

    Techniques: Sequencing

    Oxalate degradation by Lactobacillus cultures. Cultures were consecutively transferred in MRS containing 0.05% oxalate then transferred to MRS containing 0.1% oxalate. Cultures were assayed for oxalate at 0, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after the final transfer. A. Oxalate degrading activity of L. acidophilus cultures: (●) L. acidophilus NCFM + pTRK928 (NCK 1889), (○) L. acidophilus NCFM + pTRK882 (NCK 1895), (▾) L. acidophilus frc deletion + pTRK928 (NCK 1897), (▵) L. acidophilus frc deletion + pTRK882 (NCK 1899). B. Oxalate degrading activity of L. gasseri cultures: (●) L. gasseri ADH + pTRK928 (NCK 1967), (○) L. gasseri ADH + pTRK882 (NCK 1968), (▾) L. gasseri ATCC 33323 + pTRK928 (NCK 1969), (▵) L. gasseri ATCC 33323 + pTRK882 (NCK 1970). Error bars are standard deviations of means from triplicate measurements of three independent experiments.

    Journal: Microbial Biotechnology

    Article Title: Construction of vectors for inducible and constitutive gene expression in Lactobacillus

    doi: 10.1111/j.1751-7915.2010.00200.x

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Oxalate degradation by Lactobacillus cultures. Cultures were consecutively transferred in MRS containing 0.05% oxalate then transferred to MRS containing 0.1% oxalate. Cultures were assayed for oxalate at 0, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after the final transfer. A. Oxalate degrading activity of L. acidophilus cultures: (●) L. acidophilus NCFM + pTRK928 (NCK 1889), (○) L. acidophilus NCFM + pTRK882 (NCK 1895), (▾) L. acidophilus frc deletion + pTRK928 (NCK 1897), (▵) L. acidophilus frc deletion + pTRK882 (NCK 1899). B. Oxalate degrading activity of L. gasseri cultures: (●) L. gasseri ADH + pTRK928 (NCK 1967), (○) L. gasseri ADH + pTRK882 (NCK 1968), (▾) L. gasseri ATCC 33323 + pTRK928 (NCK 1969), (▵) L. gasseri ATCC 33323 + pTRK882 (NCK 1970). Error bars are standard deviations of means from triplicate measurements of three independent experiments.

    Article Snippet: Oxalate degradation in the L. gasseri strains was 20–45% over 96 h with the L. gasseri ATCC 33323‐derived strains degrading 10–25% greater amounts of oxalate than the L. gasseri ADH‐derived strains.

    Techniques: Activity Assay

    β ‐Glucurondiase activity of inducible vectors. GUS activity of (A) L. acidophilus and (B) L. gasseri harbouring pTRK888 (pFOS), pTRK889 (pLAC) and pTRK890 (pTRE) in inducing carbohydrate (black), fructose (light grey) and glucose (dark grey) at 1 h post induction. Inducing carbohydrates were as follows: pTRK888, FOS; pTRK889, lactose; pTRK890, trehalose. Error bars represent the SEM for three independent experiments.

    Journal: Microbial Biotechnology

    Article Title: Construction of vectors for inducible and constitutive gene expression in Lactobacillus

    doi: 10.1111/j.1751-7915.2010.00200.x

    Figure Lengend Snippet: β ‐Glucurondiase activity of inducible vectors. GUS activity of (A) L. acidophilus and (B) L. gasseri harbouring pTRK888 (pFOS), pTRK889 (pLAC) and pTRK890 (pTRE) in inducing carbohydrate (black), fructose (light grey) and glucose (dark grey) at 1 h post induction. Inducing carbohydrates were as follows: pTRK888, FOS; pTRK889, lactose; pTRK890, trehalose. Error bars represent the SEM for three independent experiments.

    Article Snippet: Oxalate degradation in the L. gasseri strains was 20–45% over 96 h with the L. gasseri ATCC 33323‐derived strains degrading 10–25% greater amounts of oxalate than the L. gasseri ADH‐derived strains.

    Techniques: Activity Assay

    β ‐Glucurondiase activity of constitutive vector. GUS activity of (A) L. acidophilus and (B) L. gasseri harbouring pTRK892 at 1 h post induction. Cultures were incubated in SSM + 1% carbohydrate or MRS. Error bars represent the SEM for three independent experiments.

    Journal: Microbial Biotechnology

    Article Title: Construction of vectors for inducible and constitutive gene expression in Lactobacillus

    doi: 10.1111/j.1751-7915.2010.00200.x

    Figure Lengend Snippet: β ‐Glucurondiase activity of constitutive vector. GUS activity of (A) L. acidophilus and (B) L. gasseri harbouring pTRK892 at 1 h post induction. Cultures were incubated in SSM + 1% carbohydrate or MRS. Error bars represent the SEM for three independent experiments.

    Article Snippet: Oxalate degradation in the L. gasseri strains was 20–45% over 96 h with the L. gasseri ATCC 33323‐derived strains degrading 10–25% greater amounts of oxalate than the L. gasseri ADH‐derived strains.

    Techniques: Activity Assay, Plasmid Preparation, Incubation