vimentin  (Valiant)

 
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    Name:
    Liqui gel 29 1
    Description:
    Liqui Gel 29 1
    Catalog Number:
    04800803
    Price:
    147.4
    Category:
    Life Sciences Electrophoresis Acrylamide
    Applications:
    Protein and nucleic acid electrophoresis
    Size:
    500 mL
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    Structured Review

    Valiant vimentin
    Liqui gel 29 1
    Liqui Gel 29 1
    https://www.bioz.com/result/vimentin/product/Valiant
    Average 85 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    vimentin - by Bioz Stars, 2021-05
    85/100 stars

    Images

    1) Product Images from "Adaptive M?ller cell responses to microglial activation mediate neuroprotection and coordinate inflammation in the retina"

    Article Title: Adaptive M?ller cell responses to microglial activation mediate neuroprotection and coordinate inflammation in the retina

    Journal: Journal of Neuroinflammation

    doi: 10.1186/1742-2094-8-173

    In vivo retinal microglia and Müller cell responses to retinal microglial activation induced by intravitreal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) . In vivo activation of retinal microglia was induced by intravitreal injection of different total amounts of LPS (0 μg, 0.1 μg, 0.5 μg, 2 μg) dissolved in 1 × PBS. Eyes injected with only 1 × PBS (0 μg LPS) served as controls ( left column ). Animals were sacrificed and enucleated 3 days after intravitreal injection and cryosections prepared from the globes. ( A ) Iba1 immunolabeling ( green ) of retinal sections show that following LPS injection, microglia exhibit a dose-dependent increase in cell density and Iba-1 immunopositivity, as well as an increase in the number of vertically oriented processes ( arrowheads ) as compared to PBS-injected controls. ( B ) F4/80 immunolabeling ( red ), a marker of microglial activation, demonstrates a dose-dependent increase in the density of immunoreactive microglial cells following LPS injection. ( C ) GFAP immunolabeling ( red ) located only in astrocytic processes ( arrow ) in the PBS-injected control, did not change in its localization following LPS injection, indicating that typical Müller cell gliosis, exemplified by increased GFAP expression, did not occur under these conditions. Vimentin ( D ) and glutamine synthetase (GS) ( E ) immunolabeling ( red ), located in Müller cell process, was present under all conditions and were not noticeably different in intensity. No marked changes in the morphology of Müller cells were noted. Scale bar = 50 μM.
    Figure Legend Snippet: In vivo retinal microglia and Müller cell responses to retinal microglial activation induced by intravitreal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) . In vivo activation of retinal microglia was induced by intravitreal injection of different total amounts of LPS (0 μg, 0.1 μg, 0.5 μg, 2 μg) dissolved in 1 × PBS. Eyes injected with only 1 × PBS (0 μg LPS) served as controls ( left column ). Animals were sacrificed and enucleated 3 days after intravitreal injection and cryosections prepared from the globes. ( A ) Iba1 immunolabeling ( green ) of retinal sections show that following LPS injection, microglia exhibit a dose-dependent increase in cell density and Iba-1 immunopositivity, as well as an increase in the number of vertically oriented processes ( arrowheads ) as compared to PBS-injected controls. ( B ) F4/80 immunolabeling ( red ), a marker of microglial activation, demonstrates a dose-dependent increase in the density of immunoreactive microglial cells following LPS injection. ( C ) GFAP immunolabeling ( red ) located only in astrocytic processes ( arrow ) in the PBS-injected control, did not change in its localization following LPS injection, indicating that typical Müller cell gliosis, exemplified by increased GFAP expression, did not occur under these conditions. Vimentin ( D ) and glutamine synthetase (GS) ( E ) immunolabeling ( red ), located in Müller cell process, was present under all conditions and were not noticeably different in intensity. No marked changes in the morphology of Müller cells were noted. Scale bar = 50 μM.

    Techniques Used: In Vivo, Activation Assay, Injection, Immunolabeling, Marker, Expressing

    Influence of microglia on Müller cell gliosis, proliferation, and apoptosis . ( A ) The influence of microglia on Müller cell gliosis was assessed by evaluating mRNA expression of genes typically altered in gliosis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR: glutamine synthethase (GS), glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST), and the intermediate filament, vimentin. Representative gel images for the PCR amplification of each mRNA species, with parallel controls from which reverse transcriptase is omitted from the amplification reaction (to confirm the absence of genomic DNA amplification), are shown ( right ). While the expression levels of GS in Müller cells were not statistically distinct between the different co-culture conditions, levels GLAST and vimentin, typically elevated in Müller cell gliosis, were significantly decreased following co-culture with activated microglia. These results demonstrate that changes induced by microglia co-culture differed from those associated with typical Müller cells gliosis. ( B ) Proliferating Müller cells in culture were marked by the incorporation of BrdU and the number of proliferating cells counted and expressed as a percentage of cells present. Co-culture with unactivated microglia induced a significant decrease in Müller cell proliferation, which was further decreased with co-culture with activated microglia. ( C ) Müller cells undergoing apoptosis in culture were marked with TUNEL-labeling. The percentage of apoptotic Müller cells was low and similar between all three co-culture conditions. (* indicates p
    Figure Legend Snippet: Influence of microglia on Müller cell gliosis, proliferation, and apoptosis . ( A ) The influence of microglia on Müller cell gliosis was assessed by evaluating mRNA expression of genes typically altered in gliosis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR: glutamine synthethase (GS), glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST), and the intermediate filament, vimentin. Representative gel images for the PCR amplification of each mRNA species, with parallel controls from which reverse transcriptase is omitted from the amplification reaction (to confirm the absence of genomic DNA amplification), are shown ( right ). While the expression levels of GS in Müller cells were not statistically distinct between the different co-culture conditions, levels GLAST and vimentin, typically elevated in Müller cell gliosis, were significantly decreased following co-culture with activated microglia. These results demonstrate that changes induced by microglia co-culture differed from those associated with typical Müller cells gliosis. ( B ) Proliferating Müller cells in culture were marked by the incorporation of BrdU and the number of proliferating cells counted and expressed as a percentage of cells present. Co-culture with unactivated microglia induced a significant decrease in Müller cell proliferation, which was further decreased with co-culture with activated microglia. ( C ) Müller cells undergoing apoptosis in culture were marked with TUNEL-labeling. The percentage of apoptotic Müller cells was low and similar between all three co-culture conditions. (* indicates p

    Techniques Used: Expressing, Quantitative RT-PCR, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Amplification, Co-Culture Assay, TUNEL Assay, Labeling

    Related Articles

    Cell Culture:

    Article Title: Adaptive M?ller cell responses to microglial activation mediate neuroprotection and coordinate inflammation in the retina
    Article Snippet: Cultured cells or retinal sections were pre-incubated in blocking buffer (consisting of 10% normal goat serum (NGS), 5% bovine serum, and 0.5% Triton X-100 in 1 × PBS) for 2 hours at room temperature, and then in primary antibody (diluted in the blocking buffer) overnight at room temperature. .. Primary antibodies targeting the following molecules were used: glutamine synthetase (GS, clone: GS-6), 1:200; NeuN (clone: A60), 1:200; glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST), 1:200 (all from Chemicon International, Temecula, CA); glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, clone: 2.2b10), 1:200 for cell culture, 1:800 for retinal sections; CD11b (clone: 5C6), 1:200; F4/80 (clone: A3-1), 1:200 (all from AbD Serotec, Raleigh, NC); ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba1), 1:800 (Wako, Richmond, VA); vimentin, 1:200 to 1:800 (clone: V9, MP Biomedicals, Solon, OH and AbCam, Cambridge, MA). .. The cells or sections were then washed 3 times with 1 × PBS, and incubated in secondary antibody (1:400) for 1 hr at room temperature.

    Binding Assay:

    Article Title: Adaptive M?ller cell responses to microglial activation mediate neuroprotection and coordinate inflammation in the retina
    Article Snippet: Cultured cells or retinal sections were pre-incubated in blocking buffer (consisting of 10% normal goat serum (NGS), 5% bovine serum, and 0.5% Triton X-100 in 1 × PBS) for 2 hours at room temperature, and then in primary antibody (diluted in the blocking buffer) overnight at room temperature. .. Primary antibodies targeting the following molecules were used: glutamine synthetase (GS, clone: GS-6), 1:200; NeuN (clone: A60), 1:200; glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST), 1:200 (all from Chemicon International, Temecula, CA); glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, clone: 2.2b10), 1:200 for cell culture, 1:800 for retinal sections; CD11b (clone: 5C6), 1:200; F4/80 (clone: A3-1), 1:200 (all from AbD Serotec, Raleigh, NC); ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba1), 1:800 (Wako, Richmond, VA); vimentin, 1:200 to 1:800 (clone: V9, MP Biomedicals, Solon, OH and AbCam, Cambridge, MA). .. The cells or sections were then washed 3 times with 1 × PBS, and incubated in secondary antibody (1:400) for 1 hr at room temperature.

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  • 85
    Valiant vimentin
    In vivo retinal microglia and Müller cell responses to retinal microglial activation induced by intravitreal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) . In vivo activation of retinal microglia was induced by intravitreal injection of different total amounts of LPS (0 μg, 0.1 μg, 0.5 μg, 2 μg) dissolved in 1 × PBS. Eyes injected with only 1 × PBS (0 μg LPS) served as controls ( left column ). Animals were sacrificed and enucleated 3 days after intravitreal injection and cryosections prepared from the globes. ( A ) Iba1 immunolabeling ( green ) of retinal sections show that following LPS injection, microglia exhibit a dose-dependent increase in cell density and Iba-1 immunopositivity, as well as an increase in the number of vertically oriented processes ( arrowheads ) as compared to PBS-injected controls. ( B ) F4/80 immunolabeling ( red ), a marker of microglial activation, demonstrates a dose-dependent increase in the density of immunoreactive microglial cells following LPS injection. ( C ) GFAP immunolabeling ( red ) located only in astrocytic processes ( arrow ) in the PBS-injected control, did not change in its localization following LPS injection, indicating that typical Müller cell gliosis, exemplified by increased GFAP expression, did not occur under these conditions. <t>Vimentin</t> ( D ) and glutamine synthetase (GS) ( E ) immunolabeling ( red ), located in Müller cell process, was present under all conditions and were not noticeably different in intensity. No marked changes in the morphology of Müller cells were noted. Scale bar = 50 μM.
    Vimentin, supplied by Valiant, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 85/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/vimentin/product/Valiant
    Average 85 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    vimentin - by Bioz Stars, 2021-05
    85/100 stars
      Buy from Supplier

    88
    Valiant anti vimentin antibody
    Measures of trophoblast purity and syncytialization. (A) Western blot of cell proteins obtained 72 h after cytotrophoblast plating. Protein extracts of syncytial cultures (ST) and placental homogenates (H) were blotted for <t>vimentin.</t> (B) hCG release into
    Anti Vimentin Antibody, supplied by Valiant, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 88/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/anti vimentin antibody/product/Valiant
    Average 88 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    anti vimentin antibody - by Bioz Stars, 2021-05
    88/100 stars
      Buy from Supplier

    Image Search Results


    In vivo retinal microglia and Müller cell responses to retinal microglial activation induced by intravitreal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) . In vivo activation of retinal microglia was induced by intravitreal injection of different total amounts of LPS (0 μg, 0.1 μg, 0.5 μg, 2 μg) dissolved in 1 × PBS. Eyes injected with only 1 × PBS (0 μg LPS) served as controls ( left column ). Animals were sacrificed and enucleated 3 days after intravitreal injection and cryosections prepared from the globes. ( A ) Iba1 immunolabeling ( green ) of retinal sections show that following LPS injection, microglia exhibit a dose-dependent increase in cell density and Iba-1 immunopositivity, as well as an increase in the number of vertically oriented processes ( arrowheads ) as compared to PBS-injected controls. ( B ) F4/80 immunolabeling ( red ), a marker of microglial activation, demonstrates a dose-dependent increase in the density of immunoreactive microglial cells following LPS injection. ( C ) GFAP immunolabeling ( red ) located only in astrocytic processes ( arrow ) in the PBS-injected control, did not change in its localization following LPS injection, indicating that typical Müller cell gliosis, exemplified by increased GFAP expression, did not occur under these conditions. Vimentin ( D ) and glutamine synthetase (GS) ( E ) immunolabeling ( red ), located in Müller cell process, was present under all conditions and were not noticeably different in intensity. No marked changes in the morphology of Müller cells were noted. Scale bar = 50 μM.

    Journal: Journal of Neuroinflammation

    Article Title: Adaptive M?ller cell responses to microglial activation mediate neuroprotection and coordinate inflammation in the retina

    doi: 10.1186/1742-2094-8-173

    Figure Lengend Snippet: In vivo retinal microglia and Müller cell responses to retinal microglial activation induced by intravitreal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) . In vivo activation of retinal microglia was induced by intravitreal injection of different total amounts of LPS (0 μg, 0.1 μg, 0.5 μg, 2 μg) dissolved in 1 × PBS. Eyes injected with only 1 × PBS (0 μg LPS) served as controls ( left column ). Animals were sacrificed and enucleated 3 days after intravitreal injection and cryosections prepared from the globes. ( A ) Iba1 immunolabeling ( green ) of retinal sections show that following LPS injection, microglia exhibit a dose-dependent increase in cell density and Iba-1 immunopositivity, as well as an increase in the number of vertically oriented processes ( arrowheads ) as compared to PBS-injected controls. ( B ) F4/80 immunolabeling ( red ), a marker of microglial activation, demonstrates a dose-dependent increase in the density of immunoreactive microglial cells following LPS injection. ( C ) GFAP immunolabeling ( red ) located only in astrocytic processes ( arrow ) in the PBS-injected control, did not change in its localization following LPS injection, indicating that typical Müller cell gliosis, exemplified by increased GFAP expression, did not occur under these conditions. Vimentin ( D ) and glutamine synthetase (GS) ( E ) immunolabeling ( red ), located in Müller cell process, was present under all conditions and were not noticeably different in intensity. No marked changes in the morphology of Müller cells were noted. Scale bar = 50 μM.

    Article Snippet: Primary antibodies targeting the following molecules were used: glutamine synthetase (GS, clone: GS-6), 1:200; NeuN (clone: A60), 1:200; glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST), 1:200 (all from Chemicon International, Temecula, CA); glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, clone: 2.2b10), 1:200 for cell culture, 1:800 for retinal sections; CD11b (clone: 5C6), 1:200; F4/80 (clone: A3-1), 1:200 (all from AbD Serotec, Raleigh, NC); ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba1), 1:800 (Wako, Richmond, VA); vimentin, 1:200 to 1:800 (clone: V9, MP Biomedicals, Solon, OH and AbCam, Cambridge, MA).

    Techniques: In Vivo, Activation Assay, Injection, Immunolabeling, Marker, Expressing

    Influence of microglia on Müller cell gliosis, proliferation, and apoptosis . ( A ) The influence of microglia on Müller cell gliosis was assessed by evaluating mRNA expression of genes typically altered in gliosis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR: glutamine synthethase (GS), glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST), and the intermediate filament, vimentin. Representative gel images for the PCR amplification of each mRNA species, with parallel controls from which reverse transcriptase is omitted from the amplification reaction (to confirm the absence of genomic DNA amplification), are shown ( right ). While the expression levels of GS in Müller cells were not statistically distinct between the different co-culture conditions, levels GLAST and vimentin, typically elevated in Müller cell gliosis, were significantly decreased following co-culture with activated microglia. These results demonstrate that changes induced by microglia co-culture differed from those associated with typical Müller cells gliosis. ( B ) Proliferating Müller cells in culture were marked by the incorporation of BrdU and the number of proliferating cells counted and expressed as a percentage of cells present. Co-culture with unactivated microglia induced a significant decrease in Müller cell proliferation, which was further decreased with co-culture with activated microglia. ( C ) Müller cells undergoing apoptosis in culture were marked with TUNEL-labeling. The percentage of apoptotic Müller cells was low and similar between all three co-culture conditions. (* indicates p

    Journal: Journal of Neuroinflammation

    Article Title: Adaptive M?ller cell responses to microglial activation mediate neuroprotection and coordinate inflammation in the retina

    doi: 10.1186/1742-2094-8-173

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Influence of microglia on Müller cell gliosis, proliferation, and apoptosis . ( A ) The influence of microglia on Müller cell gliosis was assessed by evaluating mRNA expression of genes typically altered in gliosis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR: glutamine synthethase (GS), glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST), and the intermediate filament, vimentin. Representative gel images for the PCR amplification of each mRNA species, with parallel controls from which reverse transcriptase is omitted from the amplification reaction (to confirm the absence of genomic DNA amplification), are shown ( right ). While the expression levels of GS in Müller cells were not statistically distinct between the different co-culture conditions, levels GLAST and vimentin, typically elevated in Müller cell gliosis, were significantly decreased following co-culture with activated microglia. These results demonstrate that changes induced by microglia co-culture differed from those associated with typical Müller cells gliosis. ( B ) Proliferating Müller cells in culture were marked by the incorporation of BrdU and the number of proliferating cells counted and expressed as a percentage of cells present. Co-culture with unactivated microglia induced a significant decrease in Müller cell proliferation, which was further decreased with co-culture with activated microglia. ( C ) Müller cells undergoing apoptosis in culture were marked with TUNEL-labeling. The percentage of apoptotic Müller cells was low and similar between all three co-culture conditions. (* indicates p

    Article Snippet: Primary antibodies targeting the following molecules were used: glutamine synthetase (GS, clone: GS-6), 1:200; NeuN (clone: A60), 1:200; glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST), 1:200 (all from Chemicon International, Temecula, CA); glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, clone: 2.2b10), 1:200 for cell culture, 1:800 for retinal sections; CD11b (clone: 5C6), 1:200; F4/80 (clone: A3-1), 1:200 (all from AbD Serotec, Raleigh, NC); ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba1), 1:800 (Wako, Richmond, VA); vimentin, 1:200 to 1:800 (clone: V9, MP Biomedicals, Solon, OH and AbCam, Cambridge, MA).

    Techniques: Expressing, Quantitative RT-PCR, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Amplification, Co-Culture Assay, TUNEL Assay, Labeling

    Measures of trophoblast purity and syncytialization. (A) Western blot of cell proteins obtained 72 h after cytotrophoblast plating. Protein extracts of syncytial cultures (ST) and placental homogenates (H) were blotted for vimentin. (B) hCG release into

    Journal: Placenta

    Article Title: Global protein synthesis in human trophoblast is resistant to inhibition by hypoxia

    doi: 10.1016/j.placenta.2011.09.021

    Figure Lengend Snippet: Measures of trophoblast purity and syncytialization. (A) Western blot of cell proteins obtained 72 h after cytotrophoblast plating. Protein extracts of syncytial cultures (ST) and placental homogenates (H) were blotted for vimentin. (B) hCG release into

    Article Snippet: The anti-vimentin antibody was obtained from MP Biomedicals (Solon, OH).

    Techniques: Western Blot