gv 58  (Alomone Labs)


Bioz Verified Symbol Alomone Labs is a verified supplier
Bioz Manufacturer Symbol Alomone Labs manufactures this product  
  • Logo
  • About
  • News
  • Press Release
  • Team
  • Advisors
  • Partners
  • Contact
  • Bioz Stars
  • Bioz vStars
  • 88

    Structured Review

    Alomone Labs gv 58
    Gv 58, supplied by Alomone Labs, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 88/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/gv 58/product/Alomone Labs
    Average 88 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    gv 58 - by Bioz Stars, 2023-01
    88/100 stars

    Images

    gv 58  (Alomone Labs)


    Bioz Verified Symbol Alomone Labs is a verified supplier
    Bioz Manufacturer Symbol Alomone Labs manufactures this product  
  • Logo
  • About
  • News
  • Press Release
  • Team
  • Advisors
  • Partners
  • Contact
  • Bioz Stars
  • Bioz vStars
  • 86

    Structured Review

    Alomone Labs gv 58
    Stimulatory effect of <t>GV−58</t> on voltage-gated Na + current ( I Na ) in pituitary GH 3 cells. This stage of experiments was conducted in cells which were bathed in Ca 2+ −free Tyrode’s solution, and the solution contained 10 mM tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) and 0.5 mM CdCl 2 . The recording electrodes that we used were filled up with a Cs + −enriched solution. ( A ) Representative current traces activated by short depolarizing pulse (indicated in the upper part). Current trace labeled “a” was obtained during control (i.e., absence of GV-58), those labeled “b” or “c” were recorded during the exposure to 0.3 or 1 μM GV−58, and that labeled “d” was obtained in the presence of 1 μM GV-58 plus 1 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX). In ( B ), current traces (indicated in open circles) indicate an expanded record from dashed box of (A) for a higher time resolution. Of note, current trace labeled “d” was skipped. The gray lines overlaid on each trace indicate best fit to the data points with a two-exponential function. ( C ) Concentration−dependent response of GV−58−mediated stimulation of peak or late I Na residing in GH 3 cells (mean ± SEM; n = 8). The peak and late components of I Na activated in response to the depolarizing pulse from −80 to −10 mV were taken at the start and the end−pulse of the depolarizing command voltage with a duration of 80 ms. The continuous line (blue and red colors) indicates the best fit to a modified Hill equation, as revealed in Materials and Methods.
    Gv 58, supplied by Alomone Labs, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 86/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/gv 58/product/Alomone Labs
    Average 86 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    gv 58 - by Bioz Stars, 2023-01
    86/100 stars

    Images

    1) Product Images from "Activation of Voltage-Gated Na + Current by GV-58, a Known Activator of Ca V Channels"

    Article Title: Activation of Voltage-Gated Na + Current by GV-58, a Known Activator of Ca V Channels

    Journal: Biomedicines

    doi: 10.3390/biomedicines10030721

    Stimulatory effect of GV−58 on voltage-gated Na + current ( I Na ) in pituitary GH 3 cells. This stage of experiments was conducted in cells which were bathed in Ca 2+ −free Tyrode’s solution, and the solution contained 10 mM tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) and 0.5 mM CdCl 2 . The recording electrodes that we used were filled up with a Cs + −enriched solution. ( A ) Representative current traces activated by short depolarizing pulse (indicated in the upper part). Current trace labeled “a” was obtained during control (i.e., absence of GV-58), those labeled “b” or “c” were recorded during the exposure to 0.3 or 1 μM GV−58, and that labeled “d” was obtained in the presence of 1 μM GV-58 plus 1 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX). In ( B ), current traces (indicated in open circles) indicate an expanded record from dashed box of (A) for a higher time resolution. Of note, current trace labeled “d” was skipped. The gray lines overlaid on each trace indicate best fit to the data points with a two-exponential function. ( C ) Concentration−dependent response of GV−58−mediated stimulation of peak or late I Na residing in GH 3 cells (mean ± SEM; n = 8). The peak and late components of I Na activated in response to the depolarizing pulse from −80 to −10 mV were taken at the start and the end−pulse of the depolarizing command voltage with a duration of 80 ms. The continuous line (blue and red colors) indicates the best fit to a modified Hill equation, as revealed in Materials and Methods.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Stimulatory effect of GV−58 on voltage-gated Na + current ( I Na ) in pituitary GH 3 cells. This stage of experiments was conducted in cells which were bathed in Ca 2+ −free Tyrode’s solution, and the solution contained 10 mM tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) and 0.5 mM CdCl 2 . The recording electrodes that we used were filled up with a Cs + −enriched solution. ( A ) Representative current traces activated by short depolarizing pulse (indicated in the upper part). Current trace labeled “a” was obtained during control (i.e., absence of GV-58), those labeled “b” or “c” were recorded during the exposure to 0.3 or 1 μM GV−58, and that labeled “d” was obtained in the presence of 1 μM GV-58 plus 1 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX). In ( B ), current traces (indicated in open circles) indicate an expanded record from dashed box of (A) for a higher time resolution. Of note, current trace labeled “d” was skipped. The gray lines overlaid on each trace indicate best fit to the data points with a two-exponential function. ( C ) Concentration−dependent response of GV−58−mediated stimulation of peak or late I Na residing in GH 3 cells (mean ± SEM; n = 8). The peak and late components of I Na activated in response to the depolarizing pulse from −80 to −10 mV were taken at the start and the end−pulse of the depolarizing command voltage with a duration of 80 ms. The continuous line (blue and red colors) indicates the best fit to a modified Hill equation, as revealed in Materials and Methods.

    Techniques Used: Labeling, Concentration Assay, Modification

    Comparisons of effects of GV-58, GV-58 plus ω-conotoxin MVIID, and GV-58 plus tetrodotoxin (TTX) on the peak amplitude of I Na recorded from GH 3 cells. Cells were immersed in Ca 2+ -free Tyrode’s solution containing 10 mM TEA, and the pipettes used were filled with Cs + -containing solution. Current amplitude was taken at the beginning of the brief depolarizing pulse from −80 to −10 mV. Each bar indicates the mean ± SEM (n = 8 for each bar). Of notice, the peak I Na in GH 3 cells is subject to inhibition by TTX but not by ω-conotoxin MVIID. * Significantly different from control ( p < 0.05) and ** Significantly different from GV-58 (3 μM) alone group ( p < 0.05). Statistical analyses were made by one-way ANOVA among different groups ( p < 0.05).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Comparisons of effects of GV-58, GV-58 plus ω-conotoxin MVIID, and GV-58 plus tetrodotoxin (TTX) on the peak amplitude of I Na recorded from GH 3 cells. Cells were immersed in Ca 2+ -free Tyrode’s solution containing 10 mM TEA, and the pipettes used were filled with Cs + -containing solution. Current amplitude was taken at the beginning of the brief depolarizing pulse from −80 to −10 mV. Each bar indicates the mean ± SEM (n = 8 for each bar). Of notice, the peak I Na in GH 3 cells is subject to inhibition by TTX but not by ω-conotoxin MVIID. * Significantly different from control ( p < 0.05) and ** Significantly different from GV-58 (3 μM) alone group ( p < 0.05). Statistical analyses were made by one-way ANOVA among different groups ( p < 0.05).

    Techniques Used: Inhibition

    Effect of GV-58 on the steady−state I–V relationship of peak I Na . In these experiments, we voltage−clamped the cells at −80 mV, and various depolarizing pulses from −80 to +40 in 10 mV increments were applied to evoke I Na . Current amplitude at each depolarizing pulse was measured at the beginning of the voltage pulse. Data points shown in filled blue squares are control, and those in open brown circles were obtained in the presence of 1 μM GV−58. The smooth line taken with or without the GV−58 addition was fitted with a Boltzmann function as detailed in Materials and Methods.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Effect of GV-58 on the steady−state I–V relationship of peak I Na . In these experiments, we voltage−clamped the cells at −80 mV, and various depolarizing pulses from −80 to +40 in 10 mV increments were applied to evoke I Na . Current amplitude at each depolarizing pulse was measured at the beginning of the voltage pulse. Data points shown in filled blue squares are control, and those in open brown circles were obtained in the presence of 1 μM GV−58. The smooth line taken with or without the GV−58 addition was fitted with a Boltzmann function as detailed in Materials and Methods.

    Techniques Used:

    Effect of GV−58 on the recovery of I Na inactivation identified in GH 3 cells. In this set of experiments, as whole−cell configuration was securely established, we applied two−step voltage protocol in a geometrics progression as indicated in the uppermost part of ( A ). ( A ) Representative current traces obtained in the absence (upper) and presence of 10 μM GV−58. The panels on the right side, included to show better illustrations, indicate the expanded records from dashed boxes on the left side. The dashed arrow indicates an incremental progression in the trajectory of current inactivation with the increasing interpulse interval. ( B ) The relationship of interpulse interval versus the relative amplitude taken in the absence (filled blue circles) and presence (open red circles) of 10 μM GV-58 (mean ± SEM; n = 8 for each point). The relative amplitude in the y -axis was obtained by dividing the second amplitude activated by 30 ms depolarizing command voltage from −80 to −10 mV by the first one. Of note, the x-axis is illustrated in a logarithmic scale. The smooth curve in the absence and presence of 10 μM GV−58 was fitted to a single-exponential function with time constants of 5.34 and 2.11 ms, respectively. The presence of GV−58 was noted to result in an evident increase in current recovery (i.e., a reduction of recovery time constant).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Effect of GV−58 on the recovery of I Na inactivation identified in GH 3 cells. In this set of experiments, as whole−cell configuration was securely established, we applied two−step voltage protocol in a geometrics progression as indicated in the uppermost part of ( A ). ( A ) Representative current traces obtained in the absence (upper) and presence of 10 μM GV−58. The panels on the right side, included to show better illustrations, indicate the expanded records from dashed boxes on the left side. The dashed arrow indicates an incremental progression in the trajectory of current inactivation with the increasing interpulse interval. ( B ) The relationship of interpulse interval versus the relative amplitude taken in the absence (filled blue circles) and presence (open red circles) of 10 μM GV-58 (mean ± SEM; n = 8 for each point). The relative amplitude in the y -axis was obtained by dividing the second amplitude activated by 30 ms depolarizing command voltage from −80 to −10 mV by the first one. Of note, the x-axis is illustrated in a logarithmic scale. The smooth curve in the absence and presence of 10 μM GV−58 was fitted to a single-exponential function with time constants of 5.34 and 2.11 ms, respectively. The presence of GV−58 was noted to result in an evident increase in current recovery (i.e., a reduction of recovery time constant).

    Techniques Used:

    Effect of GV−58 on current decline induced during a 40 Hz train of depolarizing pulses. The train was designed to consist of 40 20 ms pulses separated by 5 ms intervals at −80 mV with a duration of 1 s. ( A ) Representative current traces obtained in the control period (a) and during cell exposure to 3 μM GV−58 (b). The voltage−clamp protocol is illustrated in the uppermost part. To provide single I Na trace, the right side of (A) denotes the expanded records from the dashed box of ( Aa ) and ( Ab ). ( B ) The relationship of peak I Na versus the train duration in the absence (filled blue symbols) and presence (filled red symbols) of 3 μM GV−58 (mean ± SEM; n = 7 for each point). The continuous smooth lines over which the data points are overlaid are well fitted by single exponential. Of note, the presence of GV−58 can slow the time course of current inactivation in response to a train of depolarizing pulses. ( C ) Summary graph showing effect of GV−58 (1 and 3 μM) on the time constant of current decay in response to a train of depolarizing command voltage from −80 to −10 mV (mean ± SEM; n = 7 for each bar). Current amplitude was measured at the beginning of each depolarizing pulse. Of notice, the presence of GV-58 produces an increase in the time constant in the decline of peak I Na activated by a train of pulses. * Significantly different from control ( p < 0.05).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Effect of GV−58 on current decline induced during a 40 Hz train of depolarizing pulses. The train was designed to consist of 40 20 ms pulses separated by 5 ms intervals at −80 mV with a duration of 1 s. ( A ) Representative current traces obtained in the control period (a) and during cell exposure to 3 μM GV−58 (b). The voltage−clamp protocol is illustrated in the uppermost part. To provide single I Na trace, the right side of (A) denotes the expanded records from the dashed box of ( Aa ) and ( Ab ). ( B ) The relationship of peak I Na versus the train duration in the absence (filled blue symbols) and presence (filled red symbols) of 3 μM GV−58 (mean ± SEM; n = 7 for each point). The continuous smooth lines over which the data points are overlaid are well fitted by single exponential. Of note, the presence of GV−58 can slow the time course of current inactivation in response to a train of depolarizing pulses. ( C ) Summary graph showing effect of GV−58 (1 and 3 μM) on the time constant of current decay in response to a train of depolarizing command voltage from −80 to −10 mV (mean ± SEM; n = 7 for each bar). Current amplitude was measured at the beginning of each depolarizing pulse. Of notice, the presence of GV-58 produces an increase in the time constant in the decline of peak I Na activated by a train of pulses. * Significantly different from control ( p < 0.05).

    Techniques Used:

    Tonic and use−dependent stimulation of peak I Na by GV−58. The cell was held at −80 mV, and the depolarizing pulse from −80 to −10 mV (30 ms in duration) was applied at 2 Hz. The application of GV−58 (1 μM) is illustrated by a horizontal bar shown above. Changes in the relative amplitude of peak I Na with or without the addition of GV−58 (1 μM) are illustrated. The peak I Na in the absence (filled circles) or presence (open circles) of GV−58 measured during regular repetitive steps at 0.5 Hz was taken as −1.0. Immediately after the voltage pulses were stopped, GV−58 (1 μM) was added to the bath. The repetitive depolarizing pulses to −10 mV at 2 Hz were applied again 25 s after the cessation of command pulses but still in the continued presence of GV−58 (1 μM) (open circles). Of notice, in the presence of GV-58, the peak I Na activated by the first depolarizing step following a pause (around 25 s) had been suppressed to a lesser extent (i.e., tonic stimulation), and, during the repetitive stimuli, the amplitude of peak I Na was further reduced exponentially to a lesser and slower extent (use−dependent stimulation).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Tonic and use−dependent stimulation of peak I Na by GV−58. The cell was held at −80 mV, and the depolarizing pulse from −80 to −10 mV (30 ms in duration) was applied at 2 Hz. The application of GV−58 (1 μM) is illustrated by a horizontal bar shown above. Changes in the relative amplitude of peak I Na with or without the addition of GV−58 (1 μM) are illustrated. The peak I Na in the absence (filled circles) or presence (open circles) of GV−58 measured during regular repetitive steps at 0.5 Hz was taken as −1.0. Immediately after the voltage pulses were stopped, GV−58 (1 μM) was added to the bath. The repetitive depolarizing pulses to −10 mV at 2 Hz were applied again 25 s after the cessation of command pulses but still in the continued presence of GV−58 (1 μM) (open circles). Of notice, in the presence of GV-58, the peak I Na activated by the first depolarizing step following a pause (around 25 s) had been suppressed to a lesser extent (i.e., tonic stimulation), and, during the repetitive stimuli, the amplitude of peak I Na was further reduced exponentially to a lesser and slower extent (use−dependent stimulation).

    Techniques Used:

    Effect of GV−58 on resurgent I Na ( I Na(R) ) activated by the downsloping ramp pulse. This set of measurements was conducted in cells bathed in Ca 2+ −free Tyrode’s solution, and we filled up the electrode with Cs + −enriched solution. The examined cell was voltage−clamped at −80 mV and the depolarizing pulse to +30 mV for 30 ms; thereafter, a slowly descending ramp from +30 to −80 mV with a duration of 300 ms (i.e., with a ramp slope of −0.37 mV/ms) was applied to evoke I Na(R). ( A ) Representative current traces obtained in the control period (a) and during cell exposure to 3 μM GV−58 (b). Inset shows the voltage−clamp protocol delivered. ( B ) Summary graph showing effect of GV−58, GV−58 plus ranolazine (Ran), and GV−58 plus CdCl 2 on the amplitude of I Na(R) (mean ± SEM; n = 8 for each bar). Current amplitudes were measured at the level of −20 mV. Of notice, in the continued presence of GV−58, subsequent application of ranolazine, but not of CdCl 2 , effectively suppresses I Na(R) activated by the descending ramp pulse. * Significantly different from control ( p < 0.05) and ** significantly different from GV−58 (3 μM) alone group ( p < 0.05). Statistical analyses were performed by one−way ANOVA among different groups ( p < 0.05).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Effect of GV−58 on resurgent I Na ( I Na(R) ) activated by the downsloping ramp pulse. This set of measurements was conducted in cells bathed in Ca 2+ −free Tyrode’s solution, and we filled up the electrode with Cs + −enriched solution. The examined cell was voltage−clamped at −80 mV and the depolarizing pulse to +30 mV for 30 ms; thereafter, a slowly descending ramp from +30 to −80 mV with a duration of 300 ms (i.e., with a ramp slope of −0.37 mV/ms) was applied to evoke I Na(R). ( A ) Representative current traces obtained in the control period (a) and during cell exposure to 3 μM GV−58 (b). Inset shows the voltage−clamp protocol delivered. ( B ) Summary graph showing effect of GV−58, GV−58 plus ranolazine (Ran), and GV−58 plus CdCl 2 on the amplitude of I Na(R) (mean ± SEM; n = 8 for each bar). Current amplitudes were measured at the level of −20 mV. Of notice, in the continued presence of GV−58, subsequent application of ranolazine, but not of CdCl 2 , effectively suppresses I Na(R) activated by the descending ramp pulse. * Significantly different from control ( p < 0.05) and ** significantly different from GV−58 (3 μM) alone group ( p < 0.05). Statistical analyses were performed by one−way ANOVA among different groups ( p < 0.05).

    Techniques Used:

    Stimulatory effect of GV−58 on window I Na ( I Na(W) ) activated in response to the upsloping ramp pulse in GH 3 cells. In these experiments, the examined cell was held at −80 mV, and we applied the ascending ramp pulse from −80- to +20 mV with a duration of 20 ms (5 mV/ms) to it. ( A ) Representative current traces activated by ramp pulse with a duration of 30 ms during the control period (a) and in the presence of 3 μM GV−58 (b). Inset in ( A ) indicates the voltage−clamp protocol applied. ( B ) Summary graph showing effect of GV−58 and GV−58 plus tetrodotoxin (TTX) on I Na(W) amplitude identified in GH 3 cells (mean ± SEM; n = 8 for each bar). Current amplitudes measured at the level of −20 mV were taken. * Significantly different from control ( p < 0.05) and ** Significantly different from GV−58 (3 μM) alone group ( p < 0.05). Statistical analyses were made by one−way ANOVA ( p < 0.05). Notably, in the continued presence of GV−58, subsequent addition of TTX effectively suppresses the magnitude of I Na(W) activated in response to brief ascending ramp pulse.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Stimulatory effect of GV−58 on window I Na ( I Na(W) ) activated in response to the upsloping ramp pulse in GH 3 cells. In these experiments, the examined cell was held at −80 mV, and we applied the ascending ramp pulse from −80- to +20 mV with a duration of 20 ms (5 mV/ms) to it. ( A ) Representative current traces activated by ramp pulse with a duration of 30 ms during the control period (a) and in the presence of 3 μM GV−58 (b). Inset in ( A ) indicates the voltage−clamp protocol applied. ( B ) Summary graph showing effect of GV−58 and GV−58 plus tetrodotoxin (TTX) on I Na(W) amplitude identified in GH 3 cells (mean ± SEM; n = 8 for each bar). Current amplitudes measured at the level of −20 mV were taken. * Significantly different from control ( p < 0.05) and ** Significantly different from GV−58 (3 μM) alone group ( p < 0.05). Statistical analyses were made by one−way ANOVA ( p < 0.05). Notably, in the continued presence of GV−58, subsequent addition of TTX effectively suppresses the magnitude of I Na(W) activated in response to brief ascending ramp pulse.

    Techniques Used:

    Inhibitory effect of GV−58 on A−type K + current ( I K(A) ) in GH 3 cells. Cells were bathed in Ca 2+ −free Tyrode’s solution containing 1 μM TTX, and we filled up the pipette with K + −enriched solution. ( A ) Represent current traces obtained in the control period (“a”, i.e., absence of GV−58) and during cell exposure to 1 μM GV−58 (b) or 3 μM GV-58 (c). The uppermost part shows the voltage-clamp protocol applied. The lower part in ( A ) shows an expanded record from the dashed box, while the data points (circle symbols) were reduced by 50 for better illustration. The smooth line in the lower part represents best fit to two−exponential function (i.e., fast and slow components in current inactivation). Summary graphs appearing in ( B , C ) demonstrate inhibitory effects of GV−58 (1 or 3 μM) on peak amplitude and slow component in inactivation time constant (τ inact(S) ) of I K(A) , respectively (mean ± SEM; n = 8 for each bar). * Significantly different from controls ( p < 0.05). Current amplitude was taken at the start of each depolarizing command voltage from −80 to 0 mV with a duration of 1 s. Of notice, cell exposure to GV−58 is capable of decreasing both peak I K(A) and the τ inact(S) value of the current in these cells.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Inhibitory effect of GV−58 on A−type K + current ( I K(A) ) in GH 3 cells. Cells were bathed in Ca 2+ −free Tyrode’s solution containing 1 μM TTX, and we filled up the pipette with K + −enriched solution. ( A ) Represent current traces obtained in the control period (“a”, i.e., absence of GV−58) and during cell exposure to 1 μM GV−58 (b) or 3 μM GV-58 (c). The uppermost part shows the voltage-clamp protocol applied. The lower part in ( A ) shows an expanded record from the dashed box, while the data points (circle symbols) were reduced by 50 for better illustration. The smooth line in the lower part represents best fit to two−exponential function (i.e., fast and slow components in current inactivation). Summary graphs appearing in ( B , C ) demonstrate inhibitory effects of GV−58 (1 or 3 μM) on peak amplitude and slow component in inactivation time constant (τ inact(S) ) of I K(A) , respectively (mean ± SEM; n = 8 for each bar). * Significantly different from controls ( p < 0.05). Current amplitude was taken at the start of each depolarizing command voltage from −80 to 0 mV with a duration of 1 s. Of notice, cell exposure to GV−58 is capable of decreasing both peak I K(A) and the τ inact(S) value of the current in these cells.

    Techniques Used: Transferring

    Effects of GV−58 on erg −mediated K + current ( I K(erg) ) in GH 3 cells. In these experiments, we kept cells bathed in high-K + , Ca 2+ −free solution containing 1 μM TTX, and the patch pipette was filled up with K + −containing solution. The composition of these solutions is elaborated in . ( A ) Representative current traces activated by a series of voltage pulses (indicated in the uppermost part). Current traces shown in the upper part were obtained during the control period, whereas those in the lower part were acquired in the presence of 10 μM GV−58. In ( B , C ), the mean current−voltage ( I–V ) relationships of peak (upper, filled symbols) and sustained (lower, open symbols) components of I K(erg) achieved in the absence (square symbols) or presence (circle symbols) of 10 μM GV−58 are illustrated, respectively. The peak and sustained components of I K(erg) were measured at the beginning and end−pulse of each voltage pulse, respectively. Each bar in ( B , C ) represents the mean ± SEM (n = 8). Of notice, the presence of 10 μM GV−58 mildly suppresses the magnitude of I K(erg) in these cells.
    Figure Legend Snippet: Effects of GV−58 on erg −mediated K + current ( I K(erg) ) in GH 3 cells. In these experiments, we kept cells bathed in high-K + , Ca 2+ −free solution containing 1 μM TTX, and the patch pipette was filled up with K + −containing solution. The composition of these solutions is elaborated in . ( A ) Representative current traces activated by a series of voltage pulses (indicated in the uppermost part). Current traces shown in the upper part were obtained during the control period, whereas those in the lower part were acquired in the presence of 10 μM GV−58. In ( B , C ), the mean current−voltage ( I–V ) relationships of peak (upper, filled symbols) and sustained (lower, open symbols) components of I K(erg) achieved in the absence (square symbols) or presence (circle symbols) of 10 μM GV−58 are illustrated, respectively. The peak and sustained components of I K(erg) were measured at the beginning and end−pulse of each voltage pulse, respectively. Each bar in ( B , C ) represents the mean ± SEM (n = 8). Of notice, the presence of 10 μM GV−58 mildly suppresses the magnitude of I K(erg) in these cells.

    Techniques Used: Transferring

    Effects of GV−58 on spontaneous action potentials (APs) recorded from GH 3 cells. Cells were bathed in normal Tyrode’s solution, and the recording pipettes were filled with K + −containing solution. When whole−cell configuration was established, we switched to the whole−cell current clamp recordings to measure changes in membrane potential, as current was set at zero. ( A ) Representative potential traces achieved in the absence (upper) and presence of 1 μM GV−58 (middle) or 3 μM GV−58 (lower). ( B ) Summary graph demonstrating effect of ω−conotoxin MVIID, GV−58, and GV−58 plus ranolazine (Ran) on the firing frequency of APs in GH 3 cells (mean ± SEM; n = 8). * Significantly different from control ( p < 0.05) and ** Significantly different from GV−58 (3 μM) alone group ( p < 0.05). Statistical analyses were made in one−way ANOVA among different groups ( p < 0.05).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Effects of GV−58 on spontaneous action potentials (APs) recorded from GH 3 cells. Cells were bathed in normal Tyrode’s solution, and the recording pipettes were filled with K + −containing solution. When whole−cell configuration was established, we switched to the whole−cell current clamp recordings to measure changes in membrane potential, as current was set at zero. ( A ) Representative potential traces achieved in the absence (upper) and presence of 1 μM GV−58 (middle) or 3 μM GV−58 (lower). ( B ) Summary graph demonstrating effect of ω−conotoxin MVIID, GV−58, and GV−58 plus ranolazine (Ran) on the firing frequency of APs in GH 3 cells (mean ± SEM; n = 8). * Significantly different from control ( p < 0.05) and ** Significantly different from GV−58 (3 μM) alone group ( p < 0.05). Statistical analyses were made in one−way ANOVA among different groups ( p < 0.05).

    Techniques Used:

    Effects of GV−58 on I Na identified in NSC−34 motor neuron−like cells. These experiments were undertaken in cells bathed in Ca 2+ −free Tyrode’s solution which contained 10 mM TEA and 0.5 mM CdCl 2 , while the recording pipettes that we prepared were filled up with Cs + −containing solution. ( A ) Representative I Na traces obtained in the control (a), during cell exposure to 1 μM GV−58 (b) or 3 μM GV−58 (c), and in the presence of 3 μM GV−58 plus 1 μM TTX (d). The upper part in ( A ) depicts the voltage−clamp protocol applied. In ( B ), an expanded record showing I Na traces is taken from the dashed box in ( A ). ( C ) Summary graph showing effect of GV−58 (1 or 3 μM) and GV−58 (3 μM) plus riluzole (Ril, 10 μM). Current amplitude was taken at the beginning of depolarizing command voltage from −100 to −10 mV with a duration of 30 ms. Each bar indicates the mean ± SEM (n = 7). * Significantly different from control ( p < 0.05) and ** Significantly different from GV−58 (3 μM) alone group ( p < 0.05). Statistical analyses were made in one−way ANOVA among different groups ( p < 0.05).
    Figure Legend Snippet: Effects of GV−58 on I Na identified in NSC−34 motor neuron−like cells. These experiments were undertaken in cells bathed in Ca 2+ −free Tyrode’s solution which contained 10 mM TEA and 0.5 mM CdCl 2 , while the recording pipettes that we prepared were filled up with Cs + −containing solution. ( A ) Representative I Na traces obtained in the control (a), during cell exposure to 1 μM GV−58 (b) or 3 μM GV−58 (c), and in the presence of 3 μM GV−58 plus 1 μM TTX (d). The upper part in ( A ) depicts the voltage−clamp protocol applied. In ( B ), an expanded record showing I Na traces is taken from the dashed box in ( A ). ( C ) Summary graph showing effect of GV−58 (1 or 3 μM) and GV−58 (3 μM) plus riluzole (Ril, 10 μM). Current amplitude was taken at the beginning of depolarizing command voltage from −100 to −10 mV with a duration of 30 ms. Each bar indicates the mean ± SEM (n = 7). * Significantly different from control ( p < 0.05) and ** Significantly different from GV−58 (3 μM) alone group ( p < 0.05). Statistical analyses were made in one−way ANOVA among different groups ( p < 0.05).

    Techniques Used:

    gv 58  (Alomone Labs)


    Bioz Verified Symbol Alomone Labs is a verified supplier
    Bioz Manufacturer Symbol Alomone Labs manufactures this product  
  • Logo
  • About
  • News
  • Press Release
  • Team
  • Advisors
  • Partners
  • Contact
  • Bioz Stars
  • Bioz vStars
  • 88

    Structured Review

    Alomone Labs gv 58
    Gv 58, supplied by Alomone Labs, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 88/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/gv 58/product/Alomone Labs
    Average 88 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    gv 58 - by Bioz Stars, 2023-01
    88/100 stars

    Images

    Similar Products

  • Logo
  • About
  • News
  • Press Release
  • Team
  • Advisors
  • Partners
  • Contact
  • Bioz Stars
  • Bioz vStars
  • 88
    Alomone Labs gv 58
    Gv 58, supplied by Alomone Labs, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 88/100, based on 1 PubMed citations. ZERO BIAS - scores, article reviews, protocol conditions and more
    https://www.bioz.com/result/gv 58/product/Alomone Labs
    Average 88 stars, based on 1 article reviews
    Price from $9.99 to $1999.99
    gv 58 - by Bioz Stars, 2023-01
    88/100 stars
      Buy from Supplier

    Image Search Results